Employment and Support Allowance (ESA)
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Anyone else having a delay with ESA?

SystemSystem Posts: 519

Scope community team

This discussion was created from comments split from: Backdated ESA payments.

Replies

  • deerpdeerp Member Posts: 21 Listener
    I think the ESA backpayments are going to be seriously delayed from now on. I got the paperwork back in June, filled and sent it back promptly. Just came off the phone to them for them to inform me it may take up to March 2020 for it to be processed. I asked why it is taking so long and they said they have 500,000 to process and have had to take on a lot of new staff. They told me to call up once a month. 

    Very frustrating. Anyone else going through the same?
  • Adrian_ScopeAdrian_Scope Testing team Posts: 7,923

    Scope community team

    Hello @deerp and welcome to the community. :)
    I have heard they were taking close to 20 weeks but June 2019 - March 2020 is a long time to wait! Please let us know when you hear and fingers crossed for you. 
    Senior Community Partner
    Scope

    Your feedback is really important to the development of the online community, so please remember to complete our online community annual survey
  • deerpdeerp Member Posts: 21 Listener
    Hi Adrian,

    Thanks for welcome! Yes it is a long time to wait. I was told the reason why is dwp have to check everyone's financial status which for me would not take long as I told them I had no savings at all! 

    They must be seriously behind to take up to 9 months to make decisions. I will of course update as and when I hear anything. My advice - don't hold your breath waiting!
  • jenny_annjenny_ann Member Posts: 18 Listener
    edited October 2019
    Ive I’ve been waiting 24 weeks now since it went to processing, they told me they had requested from another department bex.bi.docs from the archives but I have no clue what this is or what purpose it’s for
  • deerpdeerp Member Posts: 21 Listener
    Hi @jenny_ann

    I can help you there. BeX is a computer program called Business Explorer. It can analyze data amongst other things. 

    This link may clarify things better for you - 
    https://www.google.com/amp/s/searchsap.techtarget.com/definition/BEx?amp=1

    In particular there is a sentence that mentions that BeX can be used to analyze financial data between fiscal years. Basically the DWP are checking your financial history on the dates when you are wanting a back payment and just want to confirm that what you have told the on the form they originally sent to you is matching their records on BeX. 

    I believe this checking is causing a lot of delays with everyone as it is not a fast process. When you have 500,000 people to check and limited staff to cope, it is leading to extreme delays like for me and you. 

    If you hear any good news please let us know. The more positive news regarding back payments is most definitely needed!
  • jenny_annjenny_ann Member Posts: 18 Listener
    Thank you @deerp I had no clue what it meant.

    I think they have processed a lot of the 500,000 I check the government website for updates if this link helps:

    https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/esa-underpayments-progress-on-checking-october-2019/october-2019-esa-underpayments-forecast-numbers-affected-forecast-expenditure-and-progress-on-checking


    I will update you if I hear anything 

  • deerpdeerp Member Posts: 21 Listener
    Thank you very much for that link @jenny_ann that is most informative. That is more information than I've ever been told by dwp when I called them. 

    I don't even understand this process to be honest. Looking at what the requirements are, it looks like you need to be seriously disabled or be entitled to other premiums yet the form I had originally was mainly just asking me what savings I had. I fail to see how they can make decisions based just on that form. Doesn't look like many people are getting any back payment now, maybe 10% of all people who have been checked recently. 

    I will of course let you know if I hear any good news. I wouldn't worry about the BeX busibess. As I say, they will just be checking your form and see if it corroborates with what you said originally when you were on Sickness Benefit/ESA. Then an arbitrary check with your bank to see if you had a secret stash of savings!
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    The premiums are not about being seriously disabled.

    For ESA there's 2 premiums available, the first one is Enhanced disability premium (EDP) this one is £16.80 per week (single person) and is automatically paid when claiming Income Related ESA, in the Support Group. For those in the WRAG or assessment rate ESA then you need to be claiming Enhanced daily living PIP or high rate care DLA to be able to claim it.

    Then there's Severe disability premium, this one isn't automatically paid and to claim it you must be claiming either DLA mid/high rate care, PIP daily living or Attendance Allowance. You must also live alone or be classed as living alone and no one must be claiming carers allowance or the carers element of Universal credit for looking after you. It's also only paid with Income Related ESA. SDP is £65.85 per week single person ( £131.70) per week for couples. Information in this link.

    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • jenny_annjenny_ann Member Posts: 18 Listener
    @deerp I don’t have a secret stash of savings I wish I did though hehe
  • jenny_annjenny_ann Member Posts: 18 Listener
    @poppy123456 thank you. I was single and put onto contributory ESA from IB with mid rate care on DLA and in the support group from July 2012-July 2014 before I moved to pip from DLA then suddenly I was given more money on my ESA a severe disability amount. Not sure if I will get anything but it would help as now im on UC and it’s absolutely terrible to survive 
  • deerpdeerp Member Posts: 21 Listener
    Good morning @poppy123456

    Looking at the gov.uk site, to get income-related ESA, it looks to me you need more than the basic sickness benefit and need to be on extra premiums or at the very least be eligible for them. I do recall for a brief time I was on disability living allowance (low component) but pretty sure I was always on contributory sickness/esa. 
     Below is from gov.uk. That's why I'm confused with the form they sent to me originally when they mainly concentrated on savings. Apart from a few questions about who I was living with and rent/mortgage arrangements, none of the questions were related to how disabled you are to possibly qualify for premiums or income based ESA.

    1. Extra payments, called premiums, are available only to qualifying customers who are eligible for income-related benefits. These include the Enhanced Disability, Severe Disability, Carer, and Pensioner Premiums.

    2. Largely between January 2011 and October 2014 some people receiving Incapacity Benefit and Severe Disablement Allowance had their claims converted to contributory ESA. However, the possibility of whether they may also have been entitled to income-related ESA was not considered for all cases. This means they may have missed out on the payment of premiums, such as the Enhanced Disability Premium.

  • deerpdeerp Member Posts: 21 Listener
    @jenny_ann I might advise the dwp the next time I call that they will have better luck trying to find a needle in a haystack than finding any savings for me! If they do happen to find any, they can send the details to me so I can access the savings myself haha! 

    The amount of tax payers money for this is beyond a joke. 

    I also hope the dwp provides the punchline when they finally get round to finishing this debacle as I'm struggling to find anything amusing with this joke.
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    edited October 2019
    jenny_ann said:
    @poppy123456 thank you. I was single and put onto contributory ESA from IB with mid rate care on DLA and in the support group from July 2012-July 2014 before I moved to pip from DLA then suddenly I was given more money on my ESA a severe disability amount. Not sure if I will get anything but it would help as now im on UC and it’s absolutely terrible to survive 
    If you were claiming severe disability premium between those dates then it's very likely you were receiving the correct amount of money. The SDP is only paid on Income related so you must have been claiming the income related top up at some point to receive the premium.

    What was the reason you claimed UC and when you claimed it were you claiming ESA within 1 month before you moved across? If so were you claiming severe disability premium in with your ESA when you claimed UC?
    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • jenny_annjenny_ann Member Posts: 18 Listener
    @poppy123456 only got the severe disability premium once I was shifted to pip in late 2014/2015 I never got this whilst on esa but I was on mid rate care.

    my son turned 18 so apparently you can’t get the severe disablement amount and my area moved me onto UC when he turned 18
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    deerp said:
    Good morning @poppy123456

    Looking at the gov.uk site, to get income-related ESA, it looks to me you need more than the basic sickness benefit and need to be on extra premiums or at the very least be eligible for them.
    Not sure what you mean by "basic sickness benefit" If you're claiming Contributions based ESA then to claim the income related top up will depend on your circumstances between the dates stated in the letter.

    Income related benefits are means tested and savings/capital, household income, pensions, partner working are all some of things that count when they calculate any entitlement to the income related top up (premiums)
    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    jenny_ann said:
    @poppy123456 only got the severe disability premium once I was shifted to pip in late 2014/2015 I never got this whilst on esa but I was on mid rate care.

    my son turned 18 so apparently you can’t get the severe disablement amount and my area moved me onto UC when he turned 18
    Sorry but now i'm confused. The SDP is paid on top of certain income related benefits, it's not paid in with your PIP payment.

    If you were still claiming child benefit for your son when he reached 18 then you were still entitled to the SDP. What was the reason you were moved to UC when your son reached 18 because the transfer hasn't taken place yet. The only way you should have claimed UC is if you had a change of circumstances at that time.

    Unfortunately, no premiums are paid with UC.
    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • deerpdeerp Member Posts: 21 Listener
    @poppy123456

    Right I have had another in-depth look at the difference between contributory and income related. You get put on contributory if you have paid enough National Insurance stamps but I'm not sure whether that's in total or a certain period prior to receiving ESA. 

    I was actually on Sickness Benefit/ESA for mental health related issues including severe depression, anxiety and one other disorder I'd like to remain private. I was on these benefits for at least 10 years. The period they are checking for me is near the end of my time on ESA. Suffice to say I wasn't doing any kind of work to pay any NI and hadn't since around 1997/1998. It's making me second guess as to whether at some point between when I was put on contributory sickness/ESA and coming off it around 2013 whether I would have been eligible for income based. It's all very confusing!
  • jenny_annjenny_ann Member Posts: 18 Listener
    Hi Poppy @poppy123456 sorry for the confusion, here are my full circs 

    I tried in August 2014 to return to work. I was in the support group but wanted to try and I had suffered PTSD and mental health issues following a violent sexual attack whilst out by a stranger. It didn’t work trying to get back to work and I was put back on esa, I was on pip then not DLA and suddenly when I returned to esa in March 2015 I was given the premium that I didn’t get before trying to get back to work.

    I don’t get CB for my son he is now looking for work and on UC which provoked a housing benefit change/tex credit and I was told I had to go on UC.
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    deerp said:
    @poppy123456

    Right I have had another in-depth look at the difference between contributory and income related. You get put on contributory if you have paid enough National Insurance stamps but I'm not sure whether that's in total or a certain period prior to receiving ESA. 


    That's correct BUT all those that transferred from IB to ESA were placed onto Contributions based ESA and some weren't assessed for any Income Related top up. Whether you're entitled to any backdated money between the dates stated in the letter you received will totally depend on your circumstances at the time. Very difficult to give any further advice on an internet forum because no one knows your exact circumstances during those dates.
    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    jenny_ann said:
    Hi Poppy @poppy123456 sorry for the confusion, here are my full circs 

    I tried in August 2014 to return to work. I was in the support group but wanted to try and I had suffered PTSD and mental health issues following a violent sexual attack whilst out by a stranger. It didn’t work trying to get back to work and I was put back on esa, I was on pip then not DLA and suddenly when I returned to esa in March 2015 I was given the premium that I didn’t get before trying to get back to work.

    I don’t get CB for my son he is now looking for work and on UC which provoked a housing benefit change/tex credit and I was told I had to go on UC.
    I understand now, thanks for explaining that. Whether you're entitled to any backdated money will depend on your circumstances during the dates stated. Very difficult to give any further advice on an internet forum because no one knows your exact circumstances. Once a decision's made DWP will send the decision letter too you.

    I do think though that you were given incorrect advice about having to claim UC at the time because your son ending education is not classed as a change of circumstances that will prompt a move to UC. Unfortunately, it's too late for that now because you're already claiming UC and you can't go back.
    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • deerpdeerp Member Posts: 21 Listener
    @poppy123456 if memory serves me right when I was on sickness benefit or whatever it was called prior to ESA, I was on contributory then too as I was working before I went on sickness as I had to stop work as I was too ill to go. Is the ESA the same as Universal Credit and the old job seekers where you still pay in to NI?
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    Universal credit is means tested and you don't need to have paid any NI contributions to be able to claim this. Claiming this will depend on household income/savings and capital.

    ESA/JSA can be contributions based or Income related.

    As advised, the reason your ESA was Contributions based when you transferred from IB is because everyone was placed onto this. Whether you're entitled to any backdated money will also depend on whether you were claiming any transitional support protection when you transferred across. All very complicated and difficult to explain on a forum. Unfortunately, you will need to wait for DWP to assess you and make a decision to know for sure.
    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • deerpdeerp Member Posts: 21 Listener
    @poppy123456 correct me if I'm wrong but memory serves me that to qualify for Incapacity Benefit, you had to pay enough National Insurance contributions, so wouldn't that make moving onto income based ESA null & void because contribution based is based on National Insurance contributions too.

    Or have I completely oversimplified matters and there are lots of hidden clauses that might make you eligible for income based ESA? 
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    Yes, that was the requirement for Incapacity benefit but all those that moved from this to ESA were automatically placed onto Contributions based. Some were assessed for the income related top up and some weren't.

    As previously advised, there's lots of things they look at when you're claiming any means tested benefits. This includes, savings,capital, living with partner that works, income from pensions, other household income, transitional support protection that you may have been receiving when you transferred across and these are just an example.
    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • deerpdeerp Member Posts: 21 Listener
    @poppy123456 I see. Thank you very much for this information. I have been searching for some semblance to this chaos and receive little to no information from DWP. You seem to be a walking encyclopedia when it comes to benefits! I can see why this site was the first listed when searching for ESA back payment issues.

    Personally I don't think I will get anything. I've been living with my parents and there wasn't an option to include what contribution to rent I pay towards so had to include it in any extra information page at the end. 

    Is living with two parents who work classed the same as living with a partner who does? My parents income is none of DWP's business and hope that has no bearing on whether or not I get back payment. I pay my way fair & square and my father is only part-time now and mother just retired.
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    You're welcome. Yes, the benefits system is a nightmare to understand and there's little information on the internet regarding this. I've done my research over the years, as well as claiming benefits myself for several years.

    Your contribution to the rent you pay your parents doesn't count for ESA purposes and won't be counted. You can't claim for help with the rent because you live with your parents.

    Parents that work are not counted when calculating any benefits you claim. That's their money, not yours. Same as their savings if they have any, it's theirs not yours.
    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • deerpdeerp Member Posts: 21 Listener
    @poppy123456 you have been a big help to me. As you correctly say, there is little information out there as to what these benefits really are and how you qualify and the procedures for attempting to get back payment for one benefit is more difficult to understand than learning Mandarin Chinese.

    I know you've said it's very difficult to say in an open forum the reasons why someone might/might not qualify for back payment but is there anywhere that has a detailed list of things the government check? 

    I put down no savings, no other income, I had to pay for 4 prescriptions a month because I was on contribution based IB, in fact I gave a very good impression I was destitute yet I just don't see me getting anything back. My circumstances are just not out of the ordinary enough.

    If the main factor was income & savings then you would find 80% of claimants would be getting back payment yet clearly it is a minority who gets them.

    I feel there is a much bigger underlying factor as to what makes someone eligible and I don't think savings/income is it.
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    You're welcome.

    For your prescriptions you could have claimed under the NHS low income scheme by filling out a form. This would have then entitled you to free prescriptions.

    There's no where specific that details what things they check. I stated most of the things that's checked in a previous comment.

    One thing what may go against you is if you were claiming any transitional support protection when you transferred from Incapacity benefit. Some people claimed this so that they wouldn't be any worse off when they claimed ESA. If you claimed this, this will be taken into consideration for any backdated money that's owed and will reduced the amount. Sometimes people aren't owed money because of the transitional support protection is more than the income related top up.

    The only disability premium that you could be entitled to is the Enhanced disability premium which is £16.80 per week from April 2019 but it will be less than that in previous years.

    May i ask what years they are looking at and how much per week ESA you were claiming at the time?
    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    In the meantime while you wait for a decision, if you're still paying for prescriptions you need to fill out the HC2 form, once the certificate is returned you'll be able to claim free prescriptions, eye tests and dental treatment. Link is here to apply.

    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • deerpdeerp Member Posts: 21 Listener
    @poppy123456 They only put one date on the form and was I think April 2012 or 2013. I do not recall a specific period of time they are looking at. I remember  was going back to work in 2013. I was getting just over £100 a week with IB as I had the extra premium due to my age. 

    Thankfully I am not suffering with the issues I had previously and successfully returned to work. I am currently unemployed and claiming the ever so popular Universal Credit. I get £321 a month with that. 

    I did not know you could claim for free prescriptions due to hardship? I remember once purchasing the 12 month subscription for prescriptions and had to resort to getting an exemption NHS card which allowed reductions with certain NHS procedures such as dentistry otherwise I would not be able to afford that as I had to pay for that too on IB. 
  • deerpdeerp Member Posts: 21 Listener
    Oh I forgot - no transitional benefits whilst ESA went through. I do recall it was quite a smooth process and received the same amount of money. Just went straight from IB to ESA.  About the only thing I can recall that we t smoothly with the benefit system!
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    edited October 2019
    When i mentioned transitional support protection i didn't mean while you waited for ESA to go through. It was money paid on top of your ESA to make sure you weren't worse off when you transferred across.

    The dates will be from the time you transferred across to the time your ESA ended as you say you returned to work in 2013. It will also depend on which group you were in at the time. WRAG or support group because the Enhanced disability premium is only automatically paid if you're in the support group. If you're in the WRAG it's only paid if you're claiming DLA high rate care or PIP Enhanced daily living.

    I didn't know that you're now claiming UC. As you no longer work then free NHS treatment is available under UC. If you receive no earnings or a net earnings of less than £435 during an assessment period then you'll qualify for free NHS treatment that month. Details here. https://www.nhs.uk/using-the-nhs/help-with-health-costs/help-with-health-costs-for-people-getting-universal-credit/

    Unfortunately, as i advised in a previous comment, it really is impossible to give any further advice here because i have no idea of your exact circumstances. We could be here all day.

    You will receive a decision from DWP once they've assessed you. Hopefully that won't be much longer. Good luck.

    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • deerpdeerp Member Posts: 21 Listener
    @poppy123456 apologies for the very lengthy posts here. As you can clearly tell, this is thee first time I've had an opportunity to speak to anyone about this who has more information than what the dwp is prepared to tell me.

    I could cope very well indeed if they told me I am not eligle for anything but the wait until possibly March next year with nothing certain is extremely frustrating. I would love an opportunity to engage direct with the people making these judgements and just provide whatever information they need so I can move on from this. 

    I really feel for rhe people who have to cope with life changing disabilities who are also waiting for possible payments knowing that payment could very well find a more comfortable life. I am pleased that forums like this exist to help people deal with their frustrations and hopefully get to speak to other disabled people who are going through the same and can really sympathise. This site and others like it are certainly the unsung heroes in this government made debacle. 

    Just know your help, support and genuine concern does not go unnoticed ☺️
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    No problem, glad i could give some advice, at least. When you ring DWP to speak to an adviser they read from a screen so mostly likely they won't know or their knowledge will be limited. Some will know more than others. They are also not the best ones to speak to for any advice and have been known to give the worst advice i've ever heard.

    The timescale you've been given is just a guide because as always for any decision, there's never a timescale. A few months ago the timescales for the underpayments was 12-20 weeks. As they've most likely contacted most people now the backlogs will have increased further.

    The benefit system is definitely a minefield, if you don't understand it. Thankfully, i do and helping any way i can is always my pleasure. I'm just sorry i couldn't give you a definite answer.


    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • deerpdeerp Member Posts: 21 Listener
    @poppy123456
    That's the thing Poppy. The dwp just send a form out and say you will hear something after 6 weeks and all you have is an ESA hotline number where you spend upwards of an hour listening to Mozart only to be told that the ESA back payment has a new line where you spend another hour listening to Mozart only to be informed they know nothing about where your process is at, whether it's actively been looked into or provide any useful information apart from 'check in every month with us'. Im sure they only want me to check in to make sure I've not died of boredom or the lack of will to live  waiting for any concrete information!

    Right that's rant over! I refuse to allow them to grind me down anymore than they already have ☺️
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    I know you love that music really ;) lol. Seriously though, they need to change that music. I rang ESA 2 weeks ago and i wanted to scream by the time thy answered that phone.
    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • deerpdeerp Member Posts: 21 Listener
    @poppy123456

    I may have to actually apply for ESA pretty soon as I'm starting to suffer with insomnia due to the nightmares I was having hearing repeated automated messages about the .gov.uk website, that I am still in a queue and all agents are busy and I'm getting very proficient with my piano skills practising Mozart when I leave my phone on speaker!

    One more phone call and if I ever appear on mastermind, my chosen subject will be 'ESA general hotline June 2019-March 2020'!

    The bit I hate about being on the line is just before you get the repeated automated voice messages every 2-3 minutes, it sounds like a glitch so you actually think someone is actually manning the phone  and have decided to pick up and actually talk to you. Then you realise it was all just wishful thinking and you really are in a nightmarish setup where you will swear blind the government is trying to punish you personally for daring to have the nerve to be ill at all by taking any will to live from you by repeatedly playing the same classical music over and over and over and over!

    😂 
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    edited October 2019
    Haha love it! I know what you mean by thinking someone is going to answer, i had that feeling when i rang last time.

    As for applying for ESA, it's New style ESA now and this replaced the old Contributions based ESA. Same rules apply with the NI Contributions to be able to claim it. You'll need to have paid enough NI contributions in the previous 2 tax years. Fit notes will be needed from your GP.

    However, because you're now claiming UC if you claim New style ESA the amount you receive will be deducted £1 for £1 from your UC monthly payments.

    The advantage to claiming New style ESA as well, is that it's not means tested like UC is and with ESA you'll receive payments every fortnight and your UC every month but of course your UC will be less.

    If you haven't paid enough NI contributions from working then you should send in fit notes to start the limited capability for work process off for UC. This will then start the work capability assessment process off, which is exactly like ESA used to be. The process when you receive the work capability assessment form is exactly the same as ESA was.

    Sorry to confuse you even more.... don't ya just love the benefit system? :D

    Unless of course you were joking, having just re-read your last comment i see about the music and insomnia? :o:D
    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • deerpdeerp Member Posts: 21 Listener
    @poppy123456

    You will soon get used to my sarcastic humour, I was of course making jest of the hotline and I will not be applying for ESA due to the government's new policy of making sure ill people do not waste the day in bed sleeping when they suffer with insomnia!

    Your post is the most informative I've seen anywhere about ESA and makes the government's techno babble on their website designed to make it as difficult as possible to even have the desire to make any claims by confusing you into doubting yourself that you are indeed eligible for anything. 

    They should employ you to speak on the automated messages on ESA hotline as there is more co?on sense on your post than there is altogether on .gov's website!

    You have obviously been to the Plain English school and passed with flying colours - well done 😉☺️
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    Such kind words, that mean alot, thank you so much for that. Made me smile. It's people like yourself that makes me continue to give advice to others.

    I didn't get that humour at first and it wasn't until i typed that last comment in full that i realised. As i'd already typed it i wasn't going to delete the whole thing as i'm sure it will help someone else, as well as maybe give you a little more knowledge :D:smile:

    Please do let me know the outcome of the underpayment decision because i will be curious.
    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • deerpdeerp Member Posts: 21 Listener
    @poppy123456

    Oh I will be sure to let you know. Just don't hold your breath waiting! I shall give them my monthly call in 2 weeks and listen to how I'm still waiting in a queue and rest assured I will be dealt with quickly and then spend 2 minutes listening to the spiel about that it is an enquiry line only and there will be no-one to help me along with every other poor soul who calls up in the lost hope someone like yourself is on the other end of line and actually cares ☺️

    I enjoyed reading your post about the new ESA. I'm assuming the only benefit to having this new ESA is that you won't have to attend appointments at the job centre where your advisor only has 10 minutes available for you so it is best not to test their job title of advising as there is very little to advise in such a short amount of time. 

    Yes I'm being sarcastic again! My way of dealing with life's little problems that come along. 😉

    Sleep well. Do not dream of Austrian composers who were born in the 18th century 😉 j

    Thanks for all your help it is very much appreciated.
  • deerpdeerp Member Posts: 21 Listener
    @poppy123456

    I managed to get a decision about backpayment ESA! If you check my initial post here it was 15th October 2019 and if you recall, the ESA backpayments hotline informed me it would take until March 2020 to get a decision as  (and I quote) 'having backdates' to the lengthy list of people waiting to hear about the backpayments.

    28th October I get a brown envelope that you know can only come from DWP to inform me that I will not be eligible for backpayment ESA. Amazingly between 15th October and 24th October (the date the letter was printed) , my details were not only found but acted upon yet it was supposed to be March next year I heard!

    Just in case you do not know @poppy123456 along with the decision, you get a detailed page of all financial concerns that the DWP have taken into consideration to make a decision. Mine had quite a few different amounts of money coming from ESA such as what they class as my living expenses based on my NI contributions which was £71.00 per week, extra money for being in the Work-related activity group which was £28.15 per week and a top-up payment of £11.70 per week to get me to the £110.85 per week which the DWP say I was entitled to. Because I did actually get £110.85 per week, they have deemed it necessary to not allow me to have a backpayment.

    I am not actually upset about it because I have the attitude of 'you can't lose what you never had'. 

    Just going through all the data they sent me, there is a lot they check up on with regards to incomings and outgoings. Luckily I lived with my parents at the time so I had no bills etc which has made the DWP's life easier to sort it out.

    Anyway Poppy I just want to say how grateful I am for all your assistance, advice and seemingly a never-ending supply of information about the benefits system and what help there is out there. It's been a pleasure 😊

    I will check back in from time to time to see if anyone needs any help that I've gone through myself.

    😉

  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    @deerp Thanks for coming back to inform us of the outcome. I can see why you weren't owed any backdated money. This will be because you're in the WRAG and not Support Group, which means you're claiming Income Related and not Contributions based because Contributions based is only paid for 365 days unless you're placed into the support group. This means that you were assessed for income related towards the end of those 365 days and as you qualified because of no other income, which means that your ESA is now all Income related and not contributions based.

    The top up you are receiving is a transitional support protection that you received when you transferred from Incapacity benefit to ESA. This was paid to make sure that you weren't any worse off at the time. However, that protection ends in April 2020, so when this happens you'll receive £102.15 per week.

    Hope this helps explain it a little more.
    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • deerpdeerp Member Posts: 21 Listener
    @poppy123456 a pleasure as always to hear from you! 

    I must admit I am confused by what you have said but it is not your fault as you described it perfectly clear. I do not recall having any confirmation from DWP I would be going from contribution based to income related. I always thought I was on contribution based. What you say makes sense that after a certain amount of time i.e 365 you're assessed to see your income but I do not recall any checks or paperwork being done.

    Can I ask you about the dates I've been given on the period they checked please as I am still uncertain why it it is only this time period and no time prior to that as I was in ESA a long time. The dates concerned are between 29th May 2012 - 9th April 2013. Why is the checks being carried out only start in May 2012? Is it the same for everyone? Just trying to seek some clarity to the muddy waters that the DWP like to throw out way!

    Thanks in advance!
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    You're welcome.

    I'm assuming that 29th May 2012 was the date you transferred from IB to ESA, am i correct? If so then those dates sound about correct as it's just under that 1 year time scale that you would have received contributions based before being assessed for income related.

    Once they assessed you for the income related then your claim would have continued because you were entitled to it. Had you not been entitled to any income related at that time then your payments would have stopped completely and you would have just receive NI contributions towards your state pension.

    As you are definitely claiming income related and not Contributions based then you will be entitled to free NHS prescriptions/dental and eye tests.

    The whole benefit system is so complicated and i must be honest, it took me a while to understand it myself. After years of claiming myself and lots of research, it's buried in my head and not something i'll forget that easily. DWP are not the best people to explain anything because most of them don't really understand it theirself.



    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
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