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Women Walking Home After Dark

Teddybear12
Teddybear12 Member Posts: 782 Pioneering
No woman feels safe walking home after dark, everyone sends a friend a text to say they have got home safely. Running shoes, keys held between the fingers, avoiding certain routes - nothing changes. All any of these women and girls are trying to do is get from A to B without being the victim of aggression. That is all, just trying to get home safely. Imagine that not being a given.

Comments

  • woodbine
    woodbine Community Co-Production Group Posts: 5,356 Disability Gamechanger
    Agreed entirely but I also think many men don't feel safe walking the streets in the dark, I know I avoid it.
    I am a person with epilepsy not an epileptic, my illness doesn't define me.
  • mikehughescq
    mikehughescq Member Posts: 7,538 Disability Gamechanger
    It’s an interesting one. 6% of female homicides take place in the street as opposed to 30% for men. Absolutely counter intuitive to the current media presentation of the issue. 

  • Teddybear12
    Teddybear12 Member Posts: 782 Pioneering
    @mikehughescq I was more on the side of whether women feel safe walking home as opposed to homicides. I probably should have said women/men. Knife crime and gangs have a lot to answer for. 
  • woodbine
    woodbine Community Co-Production Group Posts: 5,356 Disability Gamechanger
    Whilst there have been some shocking examples of knife crimes in recent years and murders as well, I think that we shouldn't lose sight of the fact that we are probably more likely to win the lottery than get stabbed on the streets.
    I am a person with epilepsy not an epileptic, my illness doesn't define me.
  • mikehughescq
    mikehughescq Member Posts: 7,538 Disability Gamechanger
    You’re on a genuinely terrible roll tonight with stats. 

    You are actually 1,000 times more likely ti be stabbed than you are to win the lottery.
  • Sandy_123
    Sandy_123 Member Posts: 2,021 Pioneering
    Its been a natural thing for me to be very wary at night, I used to finish work at 10pm, I don't drive so catching public transport, that drops you no where near home. I used to walk in the road away from hedges and dark alleys inbetween people's houses. Always looking around making sure I'm aware of who's near by.  Streets are darker now too with the lamps using low lights. 
    I think us women are more self aware. Even if some1 comes in my house to read a meter etc I leave front door open. 
  • nannymaroon
    nannymaroon Member Posts: 252 Courageous
    Sometimes I barely feel safe in my own home. That's why I stopped watching the news so much. There is always something horrific happening. I rarely go out after dark not even to walk to my car. As winter draws in I will hardly go out after 5pm. I have very little faith or trust in the police. Recent events in South London have done nothing to reverse that.
    It is so depressing that young women are being told adapt their behavior today in much the same way as my generation were told  30yrs ago. Nothing has changed for the better in all that time.
  • Sandy_123
    Sandy_123 Member Posts: 2,021 Pioneering
    Its not safe in day light too. 
  • OverlyAnxious
    OverlyAnxious Member Posts: 1,659 Disability Gamechanger
    As a man I don't feel safe at night either, or during the day in many circumstances. 

    There seems to be an idea that men could always defend themselves which simply isn't true.  I suppose the only point of difference is that I'm not likely to be a target for anyone with a sexual motive.  If someone pulls a knife or a bat, or pushes me to the ground to steal my phone or wallet, there's nothing I can do about that.  If a plain clothes officer shows a badge and strongly suggests that I get in his car, I don't see that I'm going to refuse that and simply walk away either.  

    I feel the emphasis on women here is yet another media issue rather than the reality of the situation.  But more worryingly, I don't see what could ever be done to stop it and make us all feel safe outside.  :(
  • Sandy_123
    Sandy_123 Member Posts: 2,021 Pioneering
    @OverlyAnxious   I suppose the only point of difference is that I'm not likely to be a target for anyone with a sexual motive. 
    I disagree with that.
     http://www.male-rape.org.uk/male-rape-facts-and-statistics/

    Also your right noone is safe from an attack or robbery. Or knife crime. Maybe we should learn self defence.
  • mikehughescq
    mikehughescq Member Posts: 7,538 Disability Gamechanger
    I find it incredibly uncomfortable that Ken want to step in and say “I feel unsafe too” as though that somehow makes things better. Men are the problem not the solution.
  • nannymaroon
    nannymaroon Member Posts: 252 Courageous
    I find it incredibly uncomfortable that Ken want to step in and say “I feel unsafe too” as though that somehow makes things better. Men are the problem not the solution.
    People need to see the police as a positive presence in their local community and not only when there has been a crime. Whole generations grow up thinking of the police as a hostile force and not the people who will help in an emergency.
    If I saw more police around my perception of them might be a little more positive. Sadly it took the murder of a nice middle class woman to force the police to examine themselves. People have been sounding the alarm about the met police for decades but have been ignored and silenced.
    We can't turn back the clock to a time when the police were a part of local communities. At the very least the police should re-evaluate their  recruitment / disciplinary  procedures and stop employing  psychopaths and covering up their crimes.
  • Jean Eveleigh
    Jean Eveleigh Member Posts: 156 Pioneering
    "Men are the problem not the solution"  I do not agree with this men have to be part of the solution.

    My partner says he feels unsafe going out at night as well - more so when he is taking our dog for a walk, as he often has people asking how old the dog is, how much he cost etc.

    I agree with the idea that men need to call out friends, family, work colleagues etc when they hear them talking about women in a demeaning manor or blaming them for the attack they suffer etc.

    i.e.  when I was in work I had a wrap skirt deliberately undone while I was climbing a flight of stairs, regularly had comments about my bum, boobs, legs - no  one ever helped me or stood up for me these are all examples where if a man in my life now saw this happening I would hope they would stand with me and call out the person who did it rather than stand with him and laugh at me, telling me "to loosen up; get a grip" OR "it was just a joke"

    There should also be women who call out negative behavior where women are being harassing in similar ways.
  • lisathomas50
    lisathomas50 Posts: 4,619 Disability Gamechanger
    At the moment I am studying psychology with counselling  the first part of my studying is based on city Rd Cardiff  and the lives of people and changes that have happend on city Rd and part of it included people feeling safe out side of their house 

    The film included asking men and women how safe they felt going out and both men and women said they wouldn't go out alone 

    Men attack women and women attack men made not as much or not as widely reported as men don't find it easy to say they have been attacked  by women 

    In this day and age teenagers commit against adults as well 
    Most recently in my place of work a 14 year old boy threatened an assistant  with a weapon  luckily the alarm was pressed and he ran off 

    This same boy several hours before had attacked a dog walker and two women 

    Crime happens all the time there are alot of places I wouldn't go on my own day or night but men and women and children attack people and recently there has been alot of knife crime 

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