PIP, DLA and AA
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PIP and losing your home

AnjoAnjo Member Posts: 3 Listener
edited January 4 in PIP, DLA and AA
My son receives PIP and I am his carer. We live in a small rented flat and have had numerous issues, most recently we had 4 gas leaks since November, leaking windows, plaster falling of the walls and gas is still an issue when using the boiler. So we live with the gas switched off and an electric heater and use only one room. We feel increasingly unwell here and want to move. Our letting agent says to not have anything available, other agents all ask for applicants to be in paid work, which rules us out. We are so desperate to get out of here I am thinking of moving into a static caravan on a holiday park or even a campervan or such. Question: What would happen to our PIP and carer's allowance if we do no longer have a fixed address? (I tried ringing DWP but get disconnected each time.)

Replies

  • janer1967janer1967 Member Posts: 10,254 Disability Gamechanger
    Hi and welcome sorry about your situation have you tried housing through council also shelter is an organisation  to help people with housing situations 

    I'm not sure about your PIP but one of our experts will get back to you 
  • woodbinewoodbine Community Co-Production Group Posts: 4,147 Disability Gamechanger
    Hi @Anjo good afternoon and welcome to scope, you cannot legally live on a "holiday" park, as you need another permanent address and most close for some part of the winter anyway, you can live on a residential mobile park site in a park home. Could I ask how old you both are? as @janer1967 suggest you should contact your local council they maybe able to force your landlord to make changes to where you live you could also speak to local housing associations.
    Shelter is great for information:

    https://www.shelter.org.uk/
    "Putting a child into care, isn't caring for a child" (T.Rhattigan)
  • woodbinewoodbine Community Co-Production Group Posts: 4,147 Disability Gamechanger
    some good advice from @basket123 but I would caution against making yourself intentionally homeless as the council will use this as an excuse not to help.
    "Putting a child into care, isn't caring for a child" (T.Rhattigan)
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    Hi,

    Although landlords are not susposed to discriminate tenants by refusing those claiming benefits, this doesn't mean they don't still do it. They have their ways and the first thing they do is take out the wording "DSS tenants not accepted" when advertising. It doesn't help matters either when mortgage companies don't allow benefit tenants.

    It's definitely not easy finding a landlord that accepts us and it took me a very long time too when i moved just over a year ago. Although i wouldn't go as far as not telling them i'm claiming benefits, i'd never sleep if i did this.

    To answer your question, PIP and your carers allowance won't be affected regardless of where you live. It's possible to have a PO box for your post to go to. Homeless people claim benefits still.
    Proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice I have given to members here on the community.
  • AnjoAnjo Member Posts: 3 Listener
    Thank you both for your quick response. We are 48 and 22 respectively. I have been bugging the letting agent for over a year, they have a new building manager every 6 months and each time I approach them again, emailing photos of the state of the flat and nothing but unmet promises. There is also an issue with a new boiler which is emitting toxic fumes in my son's bedroom and noisy neighbours, so even if going the stressful route of getting an outside party to try and enforce repairs etc, there will still be unresolved issues that make life unhealthy for us here. I hadn't thought to go through Shelter as I feel I am still in a position of choice (i.e. not homeless yet) but they may know of others' who were in receipt of PIP and became homeless or 'without fixed abode'. I will try them. Thanks for clarifying the distinction between a residential park and holiday park, I will keep that in mind. Thanks again.
  • mikehughescqmikehughescq Member Posts: 6,298 Disability Gamechanger
    Nothing happens. They’re paid to a bank account. They just need a “care of” address for post.
  • yanniyanni Member Posts: 50 Courageous

    @Anjo

    Given my own experience, please be cautious about buying a residential mobile home. It might seem a good idea but the reality is different.

     The Mobile Homes Act 2013 was supposed to give residents more legal protection with councils having the right to act against rogue site owners. However the Act gave the councils the right but not the responsibility to act. So if you have problems with the site owners and the council won’t take any action - like mine won’t, claiming they don’t have the budget to - you are stuffed (and unlike a rental property you can’t just move on, you have to sell the mobile home at which point the site owners are entitled to up to 10% of the sale price). 

    My neighbour's concrete base was damaged by an untreated water leak from one of the site owner's rental properties on our site. The law clearly states it is the site owners responsibility to repair the base. They won't. His insurance company rightly say it is the site owners responsibility so not covered by his insurance.The council refuses to do anything. His home is collapsing and unsaleable and he is now looking at being homeless within a year or two in his early 70's. It is heartbreaking to watch him try to keep it habitable.

    I have had a year of threats of legal action and eviction because I invoked my legal right not to pay the pitch fee increase (of £3 per month!!) due to the deteriorating condition of the site.

    Some councils do take action against rogue site owners but the law doesn’t require them to do so.

     Theoretically you can take the site owners to a tribunal but if you do this they can make your life hell afterwards (and again you have to sell the home if you want to get away from them).

     Even new-ish homes are cold in winter so heating costs are higher.

     Utilities are often supplied through the site owner so you can’t switch to a cheaper provider or dual fuel contracts so utilities are more expensive than they could be as the site owner has no incentive to shop around for a good deal.

     As well as buying the home you have to pay a monthly ground rent / pitch fee which increases each year with inflation. Currently mine is £160 per month. Plus A or B band council tax.

    As with me, a nice site can change into a nightmare just by a change of site owners.

    When I moved here the site owner was a nice man. When he retired his children took over and the only thing they are interested in is collecting their money. The site conditions have deteriorated massively so no-one wants to buy the homes. Residents then end up selling their homes to the site owners at far less than their market value and then these are rented out to make the site owners more money.

     I know of other sites where residents have had similar issues as well.

     Please be careful if you go down this route. I wouldn't recommend it to anyone.

     You can rent mobile homes rather than buy but you can have the same problems that you have now - a landlord who won’t do anything about gas leaks, maintenance,noisy neighbours etc.

    Shelter's website has this about gas issues in rented homes which might be helpful:

    https://england.shelter.org.uk/housing_advice/repairs/gas_safety_in_rented_homes
  • cupcake88cupcake88 Member Posts: 905 Pioneering
    Hi there great advice from above I’m sorry about your situation . I have a dog and when I have looked for property in the past it always used to say no dogs and no dss . Apparently they say things like working tenants only my friend was telling me . I have no idea why they don’t want to take on people who don’t work I think that’s really bad that they don’t . My friend rents property she always rents to people who don’t work she said it’s the people that earn loads of money who are the worst at paying there rent. 

    We rent privately our landlords were really nice they know I’m not well and my partner works there nor bothered bout that but I know estate agents like it if both people work .
    i personally have never had a council property or dss . How ever I was homeless years ago me and my little dog when I escaped domestic violence years ago the council did put me and my dog in like temporary housing women’s aid Helped me with that and the council it wasn’t great but it stopped me and my dog for having to sleep on the streets . I was then offered a hostel for me and my dog but I went to stay with my cousin.  

    I also thought bout renting a mobile home but they shut a few months a year and it’s not a proper address . 

    I remember when I rented some where this was before I took really ill with mental illness once I found some where proper to live for me and dog . I remember I drafted up a message explaining I had fled domestic violence I had just got a job at that time I had a little dog I wrote it all out then sent it out to different landlords on gumtree and estate agents and one really nice female landlord  responded she was really lovely she said I could pay the deposit at a later date which was amazing it was a little studio flat perfect for me and my dog at the time . 

    At the moment you will prob find that not many people will be moving so they might not be much to rent at the moment but I would do the same draft up a message explaining your situation . Best of luck and please let us know how you get on . 
  • AnjoAnjo Member Posts: 3 Listener
    Thank you so much everyone who responded to my query with advice and shared stories and experiences, I very much appreciate it. I will let you know how we get on. 
  • woodbinewoodbine Community Co-Production Group Posts: 4,147 Disability Gamechanger
    yanni said:

    @Anjo

    Given my own experience, please be cautious about buying a residential mobile home. It might seem a good idea but the reality is different.

     The Mobile Homes Act 2013 was supposed to give residents more legal protection with councils having the right to act against rogue site owners. However the Act gave the councils the right but not the responsibility to act. So if you have problems with the site owners and the council won’t take any action - like mine won’t, claiming they don’t have the budget to - you are stuffed (and unlike a rental property you can’t just move on, you have to sell the mobile home at which point the site owners are entitled to up to 10% of the sale price). 

    My neighbour's concrete base was damaged by an untreated water leak from one of the site owner's rental properties on our site. The law clearly states it is the site owners responsibility to repair the base. They won't. His insurance company rightly say it is the site owners responsibility so not covered by his insurance.The council refuses to do anything. His home is collapsing and unsaleable and he is now looking at being homeless within a year or two in his early 70's. It is heartbreaking to watch him try to keep it habitable.

    I have had a year of threats of legal action and eviction because I invoked my legal right not to pay the pitch fee increase (of £3 per month!!) due to the deteriorating condition of the site.

    Some councils do take action against rogue site owners but the law doesn’t require them to do so.

     Theoretically you can take the site owners to a tribunal but if you do this they can make your life hell afterwards (and again you have to sell the home if you want to get away from them).

     Even new-ish homes are cold in winter so heating costs are higher.

     Utilities are often supplied through the site owner so you can’t switch to a cheaper provider or dual fuel contracts so utilities are more expensive than they could be as the site owner has no incentive to shop around for a good deal.

     As well as buying the home you have to pay a monthly ground rent / pitch fee which increases each year with inflation. Currently mine is £160 per month. Plus A or B band council tax.

    As with me, a nice site can change into a nightmare just by a change of site owners.

    When I moved here the site owner was a nice man. When he retired his children took over and the only thing they are interested in is collecting their money. The site conditions have deteriorated massively so no-one wants to buy the homes. Residents then end up selling their homes to the site owners at far less than their market value and then these are rented out to make the site owners more money.

     I know of other sites where residents have had similar issues as well.

     Please be careful if you go down this route. I wouldn't recommend it to anyone.

     You can rent mobile homes rather than buy but you can have the same problems that you have now - a landlord who won’t do anything about gas leaks, maintenance,noisy neighbours etc.

    Shelter's website has this about gas issues in rented homes which might be helpful:

    https://england.shelter.org.uk/housing_advice/repairs/gas_safety_in_rented_homes
    We have lived in a residential park home for ten years now and love it, never have any problems with the site owners and if we did there is a tribunal service available plus more than one organisation offering legal help.
    The 2013 act was an update of the 1983 act, but mainly took site owners out of the process should you wish to sell your park home.
    Homes built in the last 15 years have excellent insulation as good as you will find in any bricks and mortar home.
    Councils have a legal obligation to ensure that park owners are fit and proper people, but I admit that in the last nine months some things aren't being done but that's the situation NOT the councils.
    I would never hesitate recommending park homes to anyone, but as with any major purchase would always recommend thorough research.
    There is a facebook page which is a mine of information "residential park homes for nice people" well worth a read.
    "Putting a child into care, isn't caring for a child" (T.Rhattigan)
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