Why do DWP ask in assessment about whether you have pets? I think it's disgusting — Scope | Disability forum

Why do DWP ask in assessment about whether you have pets? I think it's disgusting

lillybelle
lillybelle Member Posts: 583 Pioneering
edited September 17 in PIP, DLA, and AA
Why is it that it’s the business of the DWP to ask in an assessment whether you have any pets.
I know they use the fact that you have a pet against you when you apply.
Pip is supposed to be about how your illness affects you and your day to day life. Not what possessions you may or may not have.
I thinks it is disgusting 

Comments

  • idontlikeliving
    idontlikeliving Member Posts: 119 Courageous
    I think it’s to do with mobility. I read that they ask about pets. Say if you have a dog, you must be able to walk right or just walk because of walking the dog. 
  • idontlikeliving
    idontlikeliving Member Posts: 119 Courageous
    I’ve read some real life stories, not on here. Other forums. Some of the questions I was shocked. Actually one of the questions was so vile it made me mad. 
  • janer1967
    janer1967 Member Posts: 12,909 Disability Gamechanger
    Having a pet especially a dog is very relevant 

    It indicates that you can care for one things like , feeding,  walking   bending down to pick up its pooh   being able to control it give commands 

    These all link to the pip descriptors 

    I'm not saying if you have a pet your not entitled to pip but the questions are relevant 
    I have professional experience in HR within public,  private, and charity sectors.  If I can help I will 
  • gizmovinney3169
    gizmovinney3169 Member Posts: 39 Listener
    I have a dog and they ask me but I have a dog walker they ring the company to make sure they walk vinney and feed him and given water 
  • mikehughescq
    mikehughescq Member Posts: 7,835 Disability Gamechanger
    Why is it that it’s the business of the DWP to ask in an assessment whether you have any pets.
    I know they use the fact that you have a pet against you when you apply.
    Pip is supposed to be about how your illness affects you and your day to day life. Not what possessions you may or may not have.
    I thinks it is disgusting 
    It is 100% relevant and I’d go as far as to say it’s an absolutely brilliant question. 

    - claiming to self-neglect on eating and dressing potentially loses some credibility if you can look after a pet every day.
    - many pets require you to bend and lift and walk them. It shouldn’t need explaining why that’s relevant to walking, bathing, dressing and toileting. 
    - very hard to walk some pets without some form of social engagement or sign reading or going outside or crossing roads and so on.

    So, a HCP has limited time and that 1 question potentially covers elements of 7 activities. Far from being “disgusting” it tells them loads about how your illness affects you each day. I’d go as far as to say it’s a genius question… unless of course you have  no pets and they need to find something else. 
  • woodbine
    woodbine Community Co-Production Group Posts: 5,670 Disability Gamechanger
    I think @lillybelle that the question is very relevant as are all the questions, they are just trying to build up a picture of your day to day living, And it's not about your illness its about the care and/or mobility issues you have.
    I am a person with epilepsy not an epileptic, my illness doesn't define me.
  • cristobal
    cristobal Member Posts: 987 Disability Gamechanger
    @mikehughescq - Good point, well made.

    The problem is that it only covers 7 activities if you make assumptions about who walks and feeds the pet, how often, how fa, what timer etc.

    If the interviewer does n't find this out by further questions it's not brilliant - just poor interview technique. They might as well have asked what they wanted to know in the first place!
  • OverlyAnxious
    OverlyAnxious Member Posts: 1,703 Disability Gamechanger
    Funnily enough, that's the answer I gave when asked if I had a pet...'no they're disgusting'...  :# 

    Got caught out with the games console question though.  Of course holding an Xbox controller means I can cook a meal, how silly of me!  :D
  • lillybelle
    lillybelle Member Posts: 583 Pioneering
    But isn’t it true about assistance dogs, dogs that are trained for people who are blind , deaf etc.
    Obviously these people are disabled however once these dogs have their  harnesses taken off they become a normal pet.
    they still need feeding, cleaning up after them, exercising off lead.etc
    so I don’t agree that because a person has a disability and a pet it goes against them.
    I have seen many people in electric wheelchairs taking their dogs for a walk. 
  • mikehughescq
    mikehughescq Member Posts: 7,835 Disability Gamechanger
    I was simply explaining why the question was asked. Absolutely true to say that the answers should lead down a specific line of questioning but sometimes don’t. However, if you talk to HCPs that’s often because they get such exaggerated responses to questions - tears, shouting etc. - that they never get the opportunity to explain the logic and rapidly give it up as a line of questioning. There are always two sides to things. 

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