Will the DM ring the healthcare professionals I wrote down on my form for further proof? — Scope | Disability forum
If we become concerned about you or anyone else while using one of our services, we will act in line with our safeguarding policy and procedures. This may involve sharing this information with relevant authorities to ensure we comply with our policies and legal obligations.

Find out how to let us know if you're concerned about another member's safety.

Will the DM ring the healthcare professionals I wrote down on my form for further proof?

tdotmelty27
tdotmelty27 Member Posts: 29 Connected
edited February 2021 in PIP, DLA, and AA
Do the dwp DM always ring health care professions who i have wrote down on my fourm do they contact my gp and my mental health nurse or do they sometimes call them depending if they need any more proof?

Comments

  • janer1967
    janer1967 Member Posts: 16,449 Disability Gamechanger
    Hi 

    They sometimes send a form for them to complete 

    However it is your responsibility to provide medical evidence but only relevant if it states how your daily living or mobility is affected 

    Things like physio or ot report or mental health nurse someone who has witnessed you carrying out the activities 
  • MarkM88
    MarkM88 Member Posts: 3,130 Connected
    Mostly it’s down to you to provide the evidence. 

    Medical evidence is not needed for a successful claim as it’s not about diagnosis. 
  • woodbine
    woodbine Member, Community Co-Production Group Posts: 7,755 Disability Gamechanger
    If you chose to send supporting evidence it's best to make sure its relevant and fairly recent, too much and they possibly won't read most of it.
    Be extra nice to new members.
  • BrettW
    BrettW Member Posts: 607 Pioneering
    Im pretty sure that they got hold of my medical notes because I didn't send any medical evidence with my claim. The assessor actually mentioned to me things about my medical history that even I wasn't aware of. In the notes on the report she actually refers to elements of my medical history that weren't discussed on the day either. So its probably a random thing as to whether they do or not
  • calcotti
    calcotti Member Posts: 6,377 Disability Gamechanger
    Even when they do contact GPs the response they get is often useless. Particular these days when most patients don’t see the same GP every time the GP filling out the form often has no idea how patients are impacted by their healthy condition.

    PIP is all about impact, not diagnosis - although letters confirming a diagnosis, if available, can be helpful in supporting what you say about impact.
    Information I post is for England unless otherwise stated. Rules may be different in other parts of UK.
  • tdotmelty27
    tdotmelty27 Member Posts: 29 Connected
    Thank you so much for the replys just was worried as gps and that aint always the most helpful as i see different gps also other health professions are not always the easiest to contact and dont always see how i am on a daily basis so sometimes they can seek more evidence but sometimes not i guess.
  • calcotti
    calcotti Member Posts: 6,377 Disability Gamechanger
    mikehughescq said: Well that’s a novel take. I’ve yet to see any later confirming diagnosis make a contribution to a discussion on functional consequences. 
    That wasn’t what I meant to suggest - sorry you read it like that. What I meant was for example, if you say you can’t walk very far because of the pain you experience as a result of the tumour in your leg it is, in my opinion, helpful to have a letter that confirms you do indeed have a tumour in your leg. However not everyone with a tumour in their leg their leg will be affected in the same way so the diagnostic letter is not sufficient.

    Hope that makes more sense.

    Information I post is for England unless otherwise stated. Rules may be different in other parts of UK.
  • woodbine
    woodbine Member, Community Co-Production Group Posts: 7,755 Disability Gamechanger
    I think there is a good case for trying to make advice on benefits as simple and straight forward as possible, anything else is just confusing for many people who have little knowledge of a complicated system.
    Be extra nice to new members.
  • woodbine
    woodbine Member, Community Co-Production Group Posts: 7,755 Disability Gamechanger
    Would have to disagree I have always for my own claims included relevant and recent evidence successfully and would always advise others to do so where possible.
    Be extra nice to new members.
  • BrettW
    BrettW Member Posts: 607 Pioneering
    Don't know how relevant this is but in my recent assessment the assessor has directly referenced my medical notes as a basis for why she recommended the points she did.

    When I had a heart attack last year it killed part of my heart. During the interview when we were talking about my mobility and the problems therein she actually asked me if the hospital had mentioned a medical term to me (I've since found out the term she used is what described why part of my heart has died). I told her no because they hadn't.

    In the report she actually states that my breathing problems are consistant and backed up by my medical notes and history. So I suppose there are times when medical diagnosis and reports do help the assessor make a conclusion

Brightness

Complete our feedback form and tell us how we can make the community better.

Do you need advice on your energy costs?


Scope’s Disability Energy Support service is open to any disabled household in England or Wales in which one or more disabled people live. You can get free advice from an expert adviser on managing energy debt, switching tariffs, contacting your supplier and more. Find out more information by visiting our
Disability Energy Support webpage.