How much for a GP's 'supporting evidence' letter? — Scope | Disability forum
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How much for a GP's 'supporting evidence' letter?

Anyone had any experience of this?
Resident joker - not to be taken too seriously ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
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Comments

  • debsidoo
    debsidoo Member Posts: 325 Pioneering
    Hi @GettinOlde
    I didn’t have to pay anything for my G.P. supporting letter.The only thing I had to pay was £30 for copies of scan results and other hospital reports from my G.P.
    This was my fault as I had only kept recent ones and needed some from a few years back. Some G.P.s will charge just as they do for signing documents such as passports etc.
         Debsidoo.x
  • poppy123456
    poppy123456 Member Posts: 28,427 Disability Gamechanger
    HI,

    It very much depends on the GP, some won't charge but most will. GP letters aren't the best evidence to send because they don't really tell them how your conditions affect you. If you have to pay then maybe it's not worth it.

    You're much better off requesting your medical records and seeing what you can use from there. It's free to have digital copies of all your medical records.
  • GettinOlde
    GettinOlde Member Posts: 495 Pioneering

    Thanks for that, I had tried searching online but was getting various results. I'm expecting a telephone appointment with my GP Friday and didn't want to cause any embarrassment by asking over the phone :/

    Resident joker - not to be taken too seriously ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • GettinOlde
    GettinOlde Member Posts: 495 Pioneering

    You're much better off requesting your medical records and seeing what you can use from there. It's free to have digital copies of all your medical records.
    I use SystmOnline for my repeats and notice there is a Full Clinical Record service but says it isn't available at my practice, although there is also a request button next to it that I tried which seemed to work - have to wait and see.
    Resident joker - not to be taken too seriously ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • poppy123456
    poppy123456 Member Posts: 28,427 Disability Gamechanger
    My medical records are also not available online, i'm not sure if anyone's is to be honest.  To request them i would need to speak to the receptionist at the DR's surgery.
  • GettinOlde
    GettinOlde Member Posts: 495 Pioneering
    My medical records are also not available online, i'm not sure if anyone's is to be honest.  To request them i would need to speak to the receptionist at the DR's surgery.
    https://www.nhs.uk/using-the-nhs/nhs-services/gps/gp-online-services/

    Resident joker - not to be taken too seriously ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • GettinOlde
    GettinOlde Member Posts: 495 Pioneering
    edited June 2019
    P.S. An email from HM Courts and Tribunal Service - Your ESA appeal: appeal lodged

    Sending evidence to support your appeal

    Useful evidence shows how your condition affects your life, for example a letter from your doctor or someone who lives with you or knows you well. It should focus on what you could and could not do at the time of the decision.

    The irony is that much condition has worsened since the time of the decision.


    Resident joker - not to be taken too seriously ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • poppy123456
    poppy123456 Member Posts: 28,427 Disability Gamechanger
    edited June 2019
    They won't be able to take into consideration any worsening of condition. My advice about a GP letter is correct, especially if you have to pay for it. A GP very rarely knows anything about your condition and the only information they would be able tell them is medication and appointments. If they know anything else it's usually because we tell them.
  • GettinOlde
    GettinOlde Member Posts: 495 Pioneering
    They won't be able to take into consideration any worsening of condition.
    Hence "irony".

    How about letters from the doctor at the Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases? I have copies of letters sent to my GP, so in theory, my GP should be aware of my condition, although I know for certain that these letters aren't always read properly.
    Resident joker - not to be taken too seriously ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • poppy123456
    poppy123456 Member Posts: 28,427 Disability Gamechanger
    Well, it's your decision whether you pay for the letter or not but i wouldn't pay my GP for any letter. Even with hospital letters being sent to him he still doesn't know how i'm affected by my conditions.
  • GettinOlde
    GettinOlde Member Posts: 495 Pioneering
    Well, I'm hoping mine does know my conditions, he has agreed to carry on prescribing medication asked of him by the HRD and has agreed to monitor my bloods, and I do tell him of my capabilities and limitations which he appears to listen to.

    What about I personal reference from a friend? It won't be in a professional capacity though.
    Resident joker - not to be taken too seriously ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • CockneyRebel
    CockneyRebel Member Posts: 5,216 Disability Gamechanger
    My medical records are also not available online, i'm not sure if anyone's is to be honest.  To request them i would need to speak to the receptionist at the DR's surgery.

    I have full access to all my records on line. I had to request it and supply two forms of ID even though I have been with the same GP for 30 odd years. They will not give you access to your records if they contain anything that could be detrimental
    Be all you can be, make  every day count. Namaste
  • CockneyRebel
    CockneyRebel Member Posts: 5,216 Disability Gamechanger
    Well, I'm hoping mine does know my conditions, he has agreed to carry on prescribing medication asked of him by the HRD and has agreed to monitor my bloods, and I do tell him of my capabilities and limitations which he appears to listen to.

    What about I personal reference from a friend? It won't be in a professional capacity though.

    Signed testamonials from friends and familly that know you well can help. A testamonial is more like a sworn statement than just a letter
    Be all you can be, make  every day count. Namaste
  • GettinOlde
    GettinOlde Member Posts: 495 Pioneering
    I have full access to all my records on line. I had to request it and supply two forms of ID even though I have been with the same GP for 30 odd years. They will not give you access to your records if they contain anything that could be detrimental
    Personally detrimental or to the tribunal hearing?
    Resident joker - not to be taken too seriously ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • poppy123456
    poppy123456 Member Posts: 28,427 Disability Gamechanger
    My medical records are also not available online, i'm not sure if anyone's is to be honest.  To request them i would need to speak to the receptionist at the DR's surgery.

    I have full access to all my records on line. I had to request it and supply two forms of ID even though I have been with the same GP for 30 odd years. They will not give you access to your records if they contain anything that could be detrimental
    Thanks. What i meant was the aren't available to me because i haven't requested them. If i did then they would be available.
  • poppy123456
    poppy123456 Member Posts: 28,427 Disability Gamechanger
    I have full access to all my records on line. I had to request it and supply two forms of ID even though I have been with the same GP for 30 odd years. They will not give you access to your records if they contain anything that could be detrimental
    Personally detrimental or to the tribunal hearing?
    Personally.
  • debbiedo49
    debbiedo49 Member Posts: 2,904 Disability Gamechanger
  • poppy123456
    poppy123456 Member Posts: 28,427 Disability Gamechanger
    £30
    It depends on the GP. Mine charges £25.
  • April2018mom
    April2018mom Posts: 2,868 Connected
    This varies from GP to GP. I would ask. 
  • GettinOlde
    GettinOlde Member Posts: 495 Pioneering
    I had a telephone appointment with my GP, he said to send him an email stating what I'd like him to write - £0.00.
    Resident joker - not to be taken too seriously ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

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