Unable to work due to disability — Scope | Disability forum
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Unable to work due to disability

Sid99
Sid99 Community member Posts: 8 Listener
edited October 2023 in Work and employment
Hi, I had a brain injury recently and will not be able to return to employment. I am 57 and am due to speak with my employer soon. What are my options for finishing work...do I just resign or is it different because of my inability to work due to my disability? 
Thank you.

Comments

  • dkb123
    dkb123 Community member, Scope Member Posts: 166 Pioneering
    you should speak to an advisor before you do anything, and certainly don't speak to your employer, Do you have a union rep or employment adviser at the CAB or here at Scope? Just resigning could lead you into all sorts of difficulties with your pensions and benefits 
  • Sid99
    Sid99 Community member Posts: 8 Listener
    Hello, thank you for replying. No, I am not a member of a Union and have not spoken to anyone about this yet. I just came across this site tonight whilst looking for advice on google.
  • Sandy_123
    Sandy_123 Scope Member Posts: 43,948 Disability Gamechanger
    Hi @sid99 welcome to the forum, are you putting in sick notes at the moment?  If not and you are not  returning to work because you feel you can't work, I would start by getting sick notes off your gp.  This should then start a referral to  your works oc  health. They will then send a report to your manager, out lining any changes that you might need to be able to do your job.
    If no changes can be made for you to safely work then the company will look at retirement on health grounds. 
    I wouldn't suggest you resign. 
  • Sid99
    Sid99 Community member Posts: 8 Listener
    Hi, yes I am still putting in sick lines and have just finished with input from the brain injury team. The outcome of their work and assessments is that work in any shape or form would not be possible for me. My work have been a great support and have said they would keep me on in any capacity but unfortunately I have not made a good enough recovery.
  • Albus_Scope
    Albus_Scope Posts: 2,911 Scope online community team
    Hi there @Sid99 and welcome to our lovely community!  

    I'm sorry to hear about your injury and issues, I'll pop your post in the benefits and employment section so more of our super knowledgeable regulars will be able to see it and offer support. 
    Albus (he/him)

    Online Community Coordinator @ Scope

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  • Sid99
    Sid99 Community member Posts: 8 Listener
    Thank you for your help
  • bg844
    bg844 Community member Posts: 3,887 Disability Gamechanger
    I think you should get some expert advice in terms of leaving employment, try speaking to ACAS: https://www.acas.org.uk/contact

    In terms of benefits, a calculation would be useful: https://www.entitledto.co.uk/benefits-calculator/Intro/Home?cid=a56ad93b-27ce-4184-8120-77bec83d958c

    If you pop your details in to the link above and come back with the results, we will be able to help out further. Just to add, do you receive any sort of benefits right now?
  • Sid99
    Sid99 Community member Posts: 8 Listener
    Hi, thanks for advice. I hadn't thought of ACAS. 
    I am currently receiving PIP, ESA and UC.
  • bg844
    bg844 Community member Posts: 3,887 Disability Gamechanger
    As you are receiving UC/ESA then leaving employment will simply be a change of circumstances for each just to let them know you are no longer working (via your UC online account and by phone for ESA). PIP is not affected and isn't a change that needs to be reported. Any potential deductions from UC for working will end and you will be paid your maximum entitlement instead.

    If you get Council Tax Support, you need to inform these separately. 
  • Sid99
    Sid99 Community member Posts: 8 Listener
    Thank you for the advice. Very helpful.
  • MW123
    MW123 Scope Member Posts: 363 Pioneering
    Hello Sid99

    It's evident that you've undergone a life-altering experience following your brain injury, and it's heartening to see that your employer has been so supportive. Given the medical assessment indicating that any form of work is not possible due to your expected recovery not progressing as anticipated, it's advisable to formally inform them about your situation. Engage in discussions about potential options, such as early retirement or ill-health retirement. Carefully review your employment contract and company policies to understand the provisions for these circumstances. 

    Rather than considering resignation, by maintaining open communication with your employer and exploring available options, you can collaboratively find the best path forward for your unique situation. I wish you the best outcome, regardless of the choice you make.


  • Sid99
    Sid99 Community member Posts: 8 Listener
    Thank you for taking the time to message. I have requested an appointment with my manager, we are meeting at the end of the month. We have been communicating fairly regularly since my accident so I don't think this will come as a surprise. Just don't really understand the differences between ill health retirement, early retirement etc. This is all new to me.
  • MW123
    MW123 Scope Member Posts: 363 Pioneering

    Hello Sid99

    When you meet your manager at the end of the month to discuss your retirement, make it clear that your health condition has led to your decision to retire. During the meeting, seek clarification regarding the differences between ill health retirement and early retirement within your employer's pension scheme. 

    Ill health retirement typically applies to individuals who can no longer work due to a severe, permanent illness or disability, often benefiting from preferential tax treatment. 

    Early retirement allows you to access your pension benefits before the scheme's normal retirement age, but these payments are usually reduced due to the early access. 

    Understanding these distinctions will enable you to make an informed decision based on your unique circumstances and the pension scheme's terms. If needed, consider consulting a financial advisor for personalised guidance. 

     It is worth noting that, based on the information you have provided, your employer seems reasonable, and I am optimistic that your transition will be smooth without any complications or challenges.  

  • Sid99
    Sid99 Community member Posts: 8 Listener
    Thank you, that is very helpful.

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