My partner is due an inheritance. — Scope | Disability forum
If we become concerned about you or anyone else while using one of our services, we will act in line with our safeguarding policy and procedures. This may involve sharing this information with relevant authorities to ensure we comply with our policies and legal obligations.

Find out how to let us know if you're concerned about another member's safety.
Please read our updated community house rules and community guidelines.

My partner is due an inheritance.

Options
steve1571
steve1571 Community member Posts: 29 Connected
I am on uc LCWRA. My partner is my carer and is due an inheritance.  We don't know the figure.  However it is believed to be over 16 thousand. What are our options? It seems stressful as we will have to pay full rent, bills and council tax. Could she reject this or will the dwp/uc ask why it was rejected and cut us off? I'm the main claimant, I'm the one who's sick. She is on my claim. I don't understand how I am effected by this.

Will we be cut off and my partner and I be expected to look for work ?

Any advice would be greatful.

Comments

  • woodbine
    woodbine Community member Posts: 11,639 Disability Gamechanger
    Options
    As soon as your receive the money you must declare it to the DWP and the council, if it takes your savings over £6k you will lose some benefits if you go over £16k you will lose all means tested benefits, but not all are means tested as an example it would not affect in anyway PIP. 
    You are of course affected by this as you are a couple and are treated as such.
    2024 The year of the general election...the time for change is coming 💡

  • FedUpandSad
    FedUpandSad Community member Posts: 9 Listener
    Options
    When you get the inheritance if it's in a trust then it doesn't count as capital. There's another few rules depending on how exactly you get it. The best bet is to speak to the CAB or someone for official advice.

    Remember when you get the money it can be spent anyway you like as long as you aren't spending it to specifically keep your benefits.
    You can buy yourself a car with the full amount and then keep your benefits. This has actually been to court so there is a precedent, the judge in that case said that the government had no business telling you what to spend your money on and it was thrown out. The DWP would have to prove that you spent it specifically to keep your benefits and that's actually very very hard for them to do, if it was me I'd buy car "x,y,z" because I've always dreamt of owning one 😉
  • poppy123456
    poppy123456 Community member Posts: 54,116 Disability Gamechanger
    Options
    If you have any debts then you can pay those off without it affecting any of your UC. Paying off debts is allowed when claiming UC as it's written into the regulations. Although you must still report receiving that money.

    When claiming UC what matters is what you have in your bank on the last day of each assessment period.

    As it's inheritance you can't refuse it because doing so could be seen as deprivation of capital and you'll still be classed as having the money.

    For council Tax reduction all local Authorities have their own rules and some have a maximum savings limit of £6,000 before entitlement to CTR ends so you must also report the changes to them. Paying off debt when claiming this could be seen as deprivation of capital if the debt isn't immediately repayable.
    I would appreciate it if members wouldn't tag me please. I have all notifcations turned off and wouldn't want a member thinking i'm being rude by not replying.
    If i see a question that i know the answer to i will try my best to help.

Brightness

Complete our feedback form and tell us how we can make the community better.

Do you need advice on your energy costs?


Scope’s Disability Energy Support service is open to any disabled household in England or Wales in which one or more disabled people live. You can get free advice from an expert adviser on managing energy debt, switching tariffs, contacting your supplier and more. Find out more information by visiting our
Disability Energy Support webpage.