This constant bashing of people with mental health issues. — Scope | Disability forum
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This constant bashing of people with mental health issues.

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JasonRA
JasonRA Community member Posts: 26 Courageous
This assertion that younger people or the public generally are just play acting mental health issues like it's the new "bad back" to claim benefits from the minister for Work and Pensions which is being echoed by a former Politician who is seen as the face of the Leave EU movement is insulting.

Was it always like this? The nasty lies and a narrative of ridiculing people who have legitimate concerns and problems? 

Instead of bashing and "othering" them how about helping them? Give them a reason to get up in the morning, to have hope which this government has taken away, figuratively hold their hands. 

Invest in Mental Health within the NHS, more CBT, more Social Prescribing, I've noticed here in Cornwall a lack of psychiatry where they can get to the bottom of said problems.

All this "tough love" is talk from the ark from people who can't seem to understand that times have changed. Britain is in the vice grip of a Mental Health crisis and it is legitimate. Would the same people parroting this be on board if politicians said the state pension isn't a right, it's a benefit? If the bus pass is means tested?

What a terrible society this Government has created or is trying to create, it is divide and rule, it's disgusting. 

This talk from certain individuals could push people over the edge, if I wasn't cared for this rhetoric would seriously effect me.

I tried not to be negative, the positive is that I'm thankful there's a great community of people who do legitimately care.


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Comments

  • Albus_Scope
    Albus_Scope Posts: 4,214 Scope online community team
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    Hi @JasonRA some very true words there.  
    I think older generations (I'm in my 40s) forget that we knew very little of mental health issues when they were younger, so they wont have been able to deal with things properly, or even be diagnosed. So it's all "back in my day" talk, which is very unhelpful and pretty damaging. Luckily more recent generations are aware and able to help, but the funding just isn't there currently. Apparently saying you have ADHD is the current 'fad' but it is in fact just a case of having more knowledge of it, thus more diagnosis are happening. 

     I'm really hoping a new government will be able to help change peoples perception on bad mental health. You wouldn't tell someone with a broken arm to just get on with it, so why should people do that to someone with depression? 
    Albus (he/him)

    Online Community Coordinator @ Scope

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    Neurodivergent.
  • MW123
    MW123 Scope Member Posts: 472 Pioneering
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    Hi @JasonRA some very true words there.  
    I think older generations (I'm in my 40s) forget that we knew very little of mental health issues when they were younger, so they wont have been able to deal with things properly, or even be diagnosed. So it's all "back in my day" talk, which is very unhelpful and pretty damaging. Luckily more recent generations are aware and able to help, but the funding just isn't there currently. 
    While newer generations introduce fresh insights into mental health, it is imperative to acknowledge that the enduring efforts of those who have suffered from mental health issues and past advocates for them have laid the groundwork for the mental health care environment we experience today. We have made significant progress, yet there remains a considerable journey ahead.

    Reflecting on my own upbringing during the 1960s and 1970s, a time when those facing mental health challenges were often unjustly relegated to institutions, I am struck by the significant progress we have achieved since then. Our journey toward de-stigmatisation and inclusivity has been arduous, yet undeniably transformative for all aspects of mental health. However, there remains a considerable distance to traverse.

    My second son, now 43, has grappled with bipolar disorder throughout his life. As a 63-year-old mother,  I have dedicated countless years since my late twenties advocating not only for him but also for countless others like him. I have tirelessly campaigned for better  treatment and support that he, and all individuals with mental health disorders, rightfully deserve to thrive as independent adults.

    Albus, I must address your remark about "back in my day" talk. While I acknowledge the increased awareness among younger generations, it's crucial not to generalise all older individuals. Some have actively fought for the changes we see today without resorting to such nostalgic talk. Making assumptions about previous generations view in a blanket statement  can perpetuate ageism and overlook the diversity within this group. Let's aim for discussions that acknowledge the complexities and honour the efforts of individuals of all ages in creating positive change around mental health.
  • Zimba
    Zimba Community member Posts: 1,873 Pioneering
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    I think there is a little more positive change around mental health, people talk more freely about their struggles, but like everything else its a battle as you can’t predicted how someone will respond when you tell them, I see it in work everyday how people responded to a lovely guy who has mental health they are mean behind his back and ignore him to his face when they’ve pushed him into a state of high anxiety and say he’s faking to get special treatment. People can be mean and some bullies never change they just get older and I have no time for people like that.
     It’s very clear to me this guy is not faking so why can’t they see this? I see him come into work with a smile on his face and he tries to be helpful and kind and these bullies just ignore him and give him all the rubbish work to do and over the course of the day you can see the change in him, its heart breaking, I have approached management to let them know and they do support him. It’s just shocking to see this kind of treatment from a group of adults who should know better, shame on them.
  • MW123
    MW123 Scope Member Posts: 472 Pioneering
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    @Zimba

    I'm really sorry to hear about what your colleague is going through. It's a sad reality that there remains a lot of stigma and misunderstanding around mental health issues. It's heartening to know that there are people like you who are empathetic and supportive. Perhaps you could continue to advocate for him and educate others about mental health, emphasising that it's as important as physical health.

    Also, it might be beneficial to encourage your colleague to speak to a mental health professional who could provide him with strategies to cope with his anxiety and the negative behaviour of others. You can be a good friend to him by just lending an ear when he needs to talk.
  • Zimba
    Zimba Community member Posts: 1,873 Pioneering
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    Hi @MW he has good mental health support in place, he’s been sectioned a few times and he did try to take his life last year, I think that’s why work are very supportive of him thankfully, he also told me that being in work helps with his mental health and wants to stay. So these work colleagues know all this they are just not nice people, I’ve tried talking to them but you can’t get through they got aggressive at me.  Management have moved him to a new area, it was his request because he knows he’s not coping well so I hope this helps him and the people are kinder to him there. I check in on him and show him a friendly face, he always smiles but there is sadness beside his eyes, I feel the right group of people around him will be a much better environment for him 🤞🏻
  • rubin16
    rubin16 Community member, Scope Member Posts: 562 Pioneering
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    I have Schizophrenia, Autism and ADHD being diagnosed when I was 18. I think the support in my area has got alot better over the years from what it used to be. I have a support worker, a Care co-ordinator (CPN) a psychologist, a consultant psychatrist and an STR worker involved in my care. I also got given my own flat that was fully furnised and funded through the NHS, and get free access to actvities within my area. I also get a free bus pass and help with appointments or benefit claiming. My support worker visits twice a week and takes me shopping, or does activities with me. My STR worker teaches me to cook meals and helps me to try meet up with people with similar situations as myself. My care co-ordinator visits every 2 weeks and just makes sure my mental health is good. My psychologist talks to me once a week and helps me manage my emotions and does talking therapy. And my consulant manages everything including my medication who I see once every like 2 months.

    I don't think I could possibly ask for any more support, as I have everything in place and getting good care in my area. The only thing is the NHS is at a stretch and massively under funded and overworked. But I have noticed that care does depend on where you live and the NHS is like a postcode lottery (some things that my area do don't have in other areas).

    My only real concern is becuase of the issues I have, I am not legally judged to have full mental capcity over things, so anything important I have to have a responsible adult with me, which makes me feel like I am still a child. I can't make my own legal decisions and anything I decide to do I have to ask my support worker first.
    I have Autism, ADHD, Schizophrenia, Gilberts Syndrome and Crohn's Disease and have knowledge in these areas.


  • 66Mustang
    66Mustang Community member Posts: 13,668 Disability Gamechanger
    edited March 23
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    Yeah I agree with Albus for the most part but I do have to say I have plenty of elderly relatives who are very receptive to learning about mental health issues, and I know quite a few people in their 20s who are the opposite

    My way of explaining it in the past which I found has gotten my point across to people is, imagine telling someone with a very visible and impactive physical disability to just get up and go for a 5 mile run - you wouldn't even think it - yet that's absolutely the same as saying something similar to someone with a psychological condition
  • MW123
    MW123 Scope Member Posts: 472 Pioneering
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    @rubin16

    It's wonderful that you have such a comprehensive support system in place. While it's understandable to feel frustrated about needing a responsible adult for important decisions, this measure is in place to safeguard your well-being. Do you have opportunities to express your preferences and have your voice heard in decisions that affect you?

    Regarding shortages in the NHS, many believe that contacting MPs or participating in advocacy groups is ineffective. However, my experience challenges this belief. Had I remained part of my fellow patients' 'moan and groan society,' we would never have secured the funding we needed. Merely discussing our concerns among ourselves doesn't catch the attention of the decision-makers. 

    I was so disgusted with our local NHS's refusal to supply the necessary cancer medication and treatments that would improve the quality of our lives that I decided to email my MP to inquire why medical funding was being denied to our group of patients. 

    I received a response from my MP and local NHS, along with a resolution within seven days. Furthermore, involving my MP also facilitated access to funding for the necessary care and medication not only for myself but also for fellow patients in my group. Miraculously, the funds were found once the situation had been highlighted through the proper channels.

    I am a firm believer in voicing concerns, even if you're a lone voice. Every voice matters, and even small actions can lead to meaningful change.
  • Albus_Scope
    Albus_Scope Posts: 4,214 Scope online community team
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    MW123 said:


    Albus, I must address your remark about "back in my day" talk. While I acknowledge the increased awareness among younger generations, it's crucial not to generalise all older individuals. Some have actively fought for the changes we see today without resorting to such nostalgic talk. Making assumptions about previous generations view in a blanket statement  can perpetuate ageism and overlook the diversity within this group. Let's aim for discussions that acknowledge the complexities and honour the efforts of individuals of all ages in creating positive change around mental health.

    Oh you're totally right there and I apologise for the generalisation.  There's always going to be some in any generation who refuse to acknowledge mental health struggles, but I'm happy so many have fought for better care throughout the years and that there has been good progress made thanks to them. 
    Albus (he/him)

    Online Community Coordinator @ Scope

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    Opinions expressed are solely my own.
    Neurodivergent.
  • bloominthedark
    bloominthedark Community member Posts: 6 Listener
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    Big hugs to everyone! 
  • JasonRA
    JasonRA Community member Posts: 26 Courageous
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    Bump.

    Sunak and Mel Stride going after people with mental health issues again, Sunak wants to make it harder for people with mental health issues to claim PIP or even get signed off work.

    I think this hinges on them being re-elected, well I hope so. I had to jump through hoops to get PIP, really not putting it on it's just been a slow deterioration, I've been on and off antidepressants like smarties since 2007, only started to claim out of work benefits in 2019, Covid happened, was accepted for PIP in 2022 then LCWRA in June of last year.

    Doctors being stripped of their right to write fit notes is a concern.
  • letitbe
    letitbe Community member Posts: 282 Pioneering
    edited April 19
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    JasonRA said:
    Bump.

    Sunak and Mel Stride going after people with mental health issues again, Sunak wants to make it harder for people with mental health issues to claim PIP or even get signed off work.

    I think this hinges on them being re-elected, well I hope so. I had to jump through hoops to get PIP, really not putting it on it's just been a slow deterioration, I've been on and off antidepressants like smarties since 2007, only started to claim out of work benefits in 2019, Covid happened, was accepted for PIP in 2022 then LCWRA in June of last year.

    Doctors being stripped of their right to write fit notes is a concern.
    Is it any wonder why Drs are relocating abroad?  
    The amount of stress they go  through is horrendous and now they’re being told by the government how they should treat their patients.

    I suffer depression/anxiety and was hospitalised last year because of it - how dare this government tell people that it’s all part of the day today issues of life. Depression is such a debilitating MH illness. 

    I’m really sick and tired of all this. 
  • Albus_Scope
    Albus_Scope Posts: 4,214 Scope online community team
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    Again, they're trying to paint people as work shy layabouts, instead of addressing the root causes of the mental health epidemic; a crumbling public service system, underfunded NHS, no qualified staff to fill roles left over from specialists leaving due to Brexit, increased working hours, poverty. The list goes on and on. 
    Albus (he/him)

    Online Community Coordinator @ Scope

    Concerned about another member's safety or wellbeing? Flag your concerns with us.
    Want to give us feedback? Complete our feedback form now.
    Opinions expressed are solely my own.
    Neurodivergent.
  • letitbe
    letitbe Community member Posts: 282 Pioneering
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    Again, they're trying to paint people as work shy layabouts, instead of addressing the root causes of the mental health epidemic; a crumbling public service system, underfunded NHS, no qualified staff to fill roles left over from specialists leaving due to Brexit, increased working hours, poverty. The list goes on and on. 
    Agreed ! 

    You can add lack of affordable housing to that  list .
  • Scrumptious67
    Scrumptious67 Community member Posts: 12 Connected
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    I've trained and worked in mental health, substance misuse and supported housing and have a whole host of horror stories I could tell but also some stories of amazing resilience and endurance from both clients and the staff. 
    The services that still exist are stretched to breaking point in the relatively wealthy area I live in, with funding still being cut.  I myself have recently been made redundant from the job I loved because of budget constraints and a change to 12 hour shifts which I couldn't do. 
    I'm not sure where all this is going to end, but Rishi and his crew are certainly going to have a lot more tragedies to answer for by the time the GE comes around. These are very scary times. ;(
  • Remina
    Remina Community member Posts: 85 Pioneering
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    What irritates me especially is this ridiculous proposal that PIP money for people with mental health conditions should be replaced by 'talking therapies' instead of giving the claimant money. Firstly these 'talking therapies' should be readily available already(!) via our NHS, no PIP claimant should be expected to be directly paying for it with the entirety of their personal independence payment.

    Secondly, Rishi and the DWP must stop acting as though 'Talking therapies' are some kind of magic bullet that will miraculously fix the root cause of everyone's mental health issues. Mental health is hugely broad and complex subject with so many different issues/symptoms/causes. My mother took her own life back in the 1990s, prior to that she had many 1-on-1 therapy appointments where she discussed her issues at length with a psychiatrist - yet in the end even with that high level of support nobody could save her. Sure it will certainly help some, but not everyone. So for Rishi and the DWP to act as though 'talking therapies' will somehow magically fix everyone's broad-range of mental health issues is in my opinion a dangerous, dismissive and ignorant viewpoint. More understanding, funding, care and compassion is needed, not cruelty and ignorance. 

    Thirdly, PIP is paid to people who are working too, so he intends to stop PIP payments for people with mental health issues who are already trying their hardest to hold down a job while also behind the scenes are struggling with their mental health issues? Won't that just create a terrible domino effect where a person is denied vital money to help them remain independent (their PIP), which may then lead to them struggling even more with their mental health, which may then lead to them possibly losing their job, which would then inevitably lead back to being destitute, unemployed, struggling and having to re-claim UC? This cruel government is literally creating even more issues with these foolish proposals.

    I mean, even if it were to be implemented, after a few therapy appointments, then what? What happens to the claimants PIP claim once the handful of therapy appointments have reached their end? Would the PIP claim just end? Or? It makes no sense to me at all.. They literally haven't thought this through at all. It would laughable at how embarassing this all is, only it isn't a laughing matter when you stop to realise how much deaths/suffering these proposals will lead to. 
  • Meg24
    Meg24 Community member Posts: 37 Pioneering
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    I have been very worried about being stripped of LCWRA for years but I never imagined they would take everyone's PIP aswell. If I lose PIP I will lose my SDP & a larger portion of my HB aswell, that will be enough to destroy all the expenses I have that ensure my stability, I am housebound without my car and I would be completely alone without my dog who acts as my carer in that she makes sure I am awake during the day and get out the house. I am not able to deal with people at all and I have sensory overwhelm which means that my preference would always be to be nocturnal, which is very bad for my tendency to have delusional thoughts and worsens my depression. If I then also lose LCWRA then I would not be able to afford to pay my rent contribution and the council tax, so I would be homeless after living in stable social housing for 16 yrs. I worked so hard with my NHS therapist to organise my life to ensure my stability, I have saved the government so much money by not needing other services because of it and at the same time my relative stability enabled me to raise my daughter well enough that she is now a fully functioning high earning tax payer. What they are proposing is a life I do not want, sending me back 2 decades to one of chaos and breakdowns, self harm and desperate loneliness. I'm 52 now, I'm not going to be able to find the will to live like that. 
  • MW123
    MW123 Scope Member Posts: 472 Pioneering
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    @Meg24

    Meg, I wanted to extend a warm welcome to you as a relatively new member of Scope. I thought it might be helpful to guide you towards the comments made by one of our community members, Poppy123456, who has an impressive depth of knowledge when it comes to welfare benefits.

    Poppy has highlighted a reassuring point: if you are already in receipt of LCWRA, the upcoming changes will not affect your situation. The proposed adjustments are intended for claimants who need to provide regular sick notes to the DWP. I thought this distinction might ease some of your worries, and I would encourage you to explore the insights shared by Poppy and our other knowledgeable members.  
  • kimkenzie202
    kimkenzie202 Community member Posts: 98 Courageous
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    Unfortunately anyone claiming SDP is gonna be affected since migration to UC for ESA claims has been brought forward to 2025, unlikely they will change the decision again especially since the DWP(it was government who delayed)wanted migration not to be delayed in the first place. Transitional payments are helpful but over time will reduce down to a normal payment. Regarding PIP, it all depends whether the Tories get re-elected, it could all be talk to get the (rightwing)voters support, David Cameron was saying very similar things when he was Prime Minister. 
  • Andi66
    Andi66 Community member Posts: 32 Courageous
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    Would Autism be classed as mental health problems regarding pip ?
    Both myself and my daughter claim it for it, I have physical problems but they put it as standard even though I struggle. I get top one for my autism. 
    Also what I find disgusting is the emphasis on mental health is now disregarded by government and media , where we had adverts encouraging people to open up about mental health.  
    I only started getting help for my mental health on nhs after years on waiting lists. My daughter who also has bpd has been let down by cahms and still on waiting list, that she even paid for private counselling but couldn't afford it in the end and gave up. 
    This is concerning me a lot

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