Autism and Aspergers
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Interface between those who have been diagnosed with ASD and those who may/may not be on spectrum

DianaWDianaW Member Posts: 30 Connected
This discussion was created from comments split from: Guest post: Getting an ASD diagnosis at 46.

Replies

  • DianaWDianaW Member Posts: 30 Connected
    Late diagnosis and how people feel about it sparked this particular discussion, Chris. The point evolved spontaneously but seems eminently worth pursuing.

    I am trying to understand the interface between those who have been diagnosed with ASD and those who may or may not be on that spectrum but have not been diagnosed and have concerns about whether diagnosis may be appropriate for them.  Considering how differently people view ideas offered by others in this discussion seemed like a very useful way to try to clarify points of difference or similarity.

    If Scope believes that this discussion would be more useful as a separate thread, then please separate it off so that it can be developed elsewhere on the forum.
  • ArielAriel Member Posts: 16 Courageous
    Hi @DianaW,

    I was following with interest but totally lost track of where the conversation went.

    What was your question? :smile:

    Hope you don't mind me jumping over to here, too. I just enjoy these discussions.
  • DianaWDianaW Member Posts: 30 Connected
    Hi @Ariel
    I'm so glad that I'm not the only one who was finding this offshoot fascinating!

    If you look back at the original thread, Sam has managed to pull together almost all the essential bits that I had in mind and - doubting my copying skills on this site and just how this separate thread trick works - I've asked him to add a couple more, to give the whole picture, and copy them over here.
    So you can refer back to the original thread for those last two posts and/or wait a bit, until the whole exchange arrives over here - I hope!
  • Sam_AlumniSam_Alumni Scope alumni Posts: 7,731 Disability Gamechanger
    "I find that life works out much better if I concentrate on the people etc that I need to work with. Better to ignore (as far as possible) the worse possibilities that may be out there than let worrying about them get in the way of the immediate issues."

    @joannarashelle replied "Wise words indeed but not always easy for those with Autism"

    And you said 
    "How does autism affect one's capacity to adopt someone else's basic philosophies, such as this one, please?"
    Scope
    Senior online community officer
  • DianaWDianaW Member Posts: 30 Connected
    @joannarashelle oannarashelle reacted to this by saying, "Maybe One doesn't want to adopt someone else's philosophies maybe One enjoys having heir own?"

    While I see her point in general - and certainly wasn't trying to force my ideas on her - it's harder to see why someone would be so averse to this particular suggestion. I had simply offered my personal solution to her earlier comment, "humans as a species are baffling to me".

    That was where the exchange potentially became so interesting, because each of us seemingly found the other's reaction inexplicable. I'm left wondering if J didn't like the idea in general, didn't like being offered it by me, or just didn't want to answer my question - whether for some personal reason or because, at this point, autism might affect the sufferer's view of being offered any suggestion, at least by someone who's apparently not on the autistic spectrum.

    In a general psychotherapy group, it's common for member(s) to offer any helpful suggestions they can think of for another member's problem and not really acceptable for that other member simply to snub the person making the offer. Does autism make it hard (or even impossible) for the sufferer to grasp the intention behind an offer of help?
  • joannarashellejoannarashelle Member Posts: 135 Pioneering
    In a word, no.

    We welcome help and like to give it!

    But it depends on the 'help' that is offered and if it's coming from a suitable source and is coherent and relevant. 

    Best wishes 


  • Sam_AlumniSam_Alumni Scope alumni Posts: 7,731 Disability Gamechanger
    "Maybe One doesn't want to adopt someone else's philosophies maybe One enjoys having their own?" - Isn't that just human nature and not necessarily an ASD symptom? Yes, we can listen to other people's philosophies but if we feel they don't understand us or that their ideas aren't relevant to our lives then we don't want to adopt them. 
    Scope
    Senior online community officer
  • joannarashellejoannarashelle Member Posts: 135 Pioneering
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 689 Listener
    The user and all related content has been deleted.
  • joannarashellejoannarashelle Member Posts: 135 Pioneering
    Hi @DannyMoore

    just 'awesome' xxx

    Thankyou for exposing it better than I ever could xxx
  • joannarashellejoannarashelle Member Posts: 135 Pioneering
    That should say 'explaining'!!

    Darn predictive text!!!

  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 689 Listener
    The user and all related content has been deleted.
  • joannarashellejoannarashelle Member Posts: 135 Pioneering
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