PIP, DLA and AA
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Assessment

charlie2017charlie2017 Member Posts: 24 Listener
edited August 2017 in PIP, DLA and AA
i have been called in for an assessment as I know most people are, but am dreading it as most people do. The main issue is I feel that these appointments are there to catch you out rather than discover the facts so o feel negative before it's even started and this will probably result in me being negative and defensive at the appointment. Has anyone else felt like this and how do you go about getting through it in a more positive light 

Replies

  • CockneyRebelCockneyRebel Member Posts: 5,258 Disability Gamechanger
    Most people feel exactly the same as you do. We hardly ever hear from people that have had a postive assessment so we all think that they are horror stories
    .
    The majority of claims are handled professionally  and sympatheticaly.

    When you go for assessment, take with you the worlds leading expert. Take with you the one person that knows all about your life. The assessor doesn't know you, they may have skimmed through your file but that is about it. This is your opportunity to paint a picture of your life and the challenges you face. It is your job to teach the assessor what help you need to lead the best life you can.

    So take the worlds leading expert with you and you cannot be wrong. This amazing expert is you.
    Be all you can be, make  every day count. Namaste
  • Barrylad1957Barrylad1957 Member Posts: 100 Courageous
    @charlie2017
    I know what you mean, mate, in all other aspects of my life, I am resolutely fearless, but my upcoming WCA has even gotten me a little twitchy. It seems like the government/media joint policy of demonising and criminalising the efforts of disabled or unwell people to maintain a reasonable standard of living are working, even on us, ourselves. When I handed in my first fit note at the jobcentre in February this year, my original 'work coach' (I've been reassigned to somebody more humane since) snorted derisively and said, "This isnt going to work, you know"; while being exposed to that low level of discrimination from a government employee was unjust and cowardly, I felt that there are people who would half surrender at that point, and I've seen people forced to attend the jobcentre who should really be at home, being cared for. Me, and millions of others like me, paid tax unquestioningly for decades to ensure that those amongst us who are too unwell to work - whatever the ailment - would be taken care of; its part of how a civilized society works. If successive 'governments' have spent our money in other ways, on other things, without our knowledge or consent, it is criminal for them to attempt to recover their losses by bullying society's most vulnerable. Do what @CockneyRebel advises, and take  the most qualified person who knows and understands how your disability affects you - yourself - to the assessment. Remember that, what you are seeking isn't a gift, a handout, or charity; its yours by right. Good luck.
  • charlie2017charlie2017 Member Posts: 24 Listener
    Thanks guys u t both so right, it's so unjust that we should be made to feel this way, I've not claimed anything for years because I'm too afraid of the stress and it's effects on the process. It is true that u always hear the negatives more than the positives , but unfortunately it's the negative things that stick in people's minds most !!  I guess the trick is to be prepared. Can I take a copy of my paperwork I sent to the dwp and refer to it ? As I will no doubt forget everything in it and not tell them something vital and then they will accuse me of lying I am assuming. :-)
  • CockneyRebelCockneyRebel Member Posts: 5,258 Disability Gamechanger
    Yes you can, but don't go overthinking it. Tell the assessor why you have notes. Most assessments are run on a type of schedule and the assessor is unlikely to change their format. Be aware that they will be watching everything you do, even before you enter the center, they do have CCTV 
    Be all you can be, make  every day count. Namaste
  • AndreasuperstarAndreasuperstar Member Posts: 13 Connected
    Hi there, I have just experienced my first ever PIP.  I wholeheartedly agree with all the above posts. I am struggling to feel positive because I cannot believe how vulnerable people are subjected to such intrusive and intimidating scrutiny.  Someone advised me, take someone with you, if you need to appeal it will be  helpful to have had a witness who can confirm what you are saying and what happened.  The process is quite cold, so don't expect small talk.  I guess they are 'trained' this way to be able to say they were impartial.  I took notes, took my diary but my mind went blank and I forgot all about my diary :neutral:. They are watching you, how you are dressed, how you arrive for the assessment etc.  I have problems with my hands ad I could see her watching me every time I moved them. My assessor was a nurse, the first thing she told me was how she carried on working with very serious spinal injuries, she also later commented ''so you  haven't sunk to the depths of watching Jeremy Kyle in your pyjamas (stereotyping by any chance??) and also made an assumption that I will not have mobiity problems being hypermobile.  These comments were duly noted and have been shared with my disability advocate who will no doubt help me with an appeal.  As advised, on a positive, this is your opportunity to describe how life is for you.  The doctors, physios etc never know in full detail what life is like for you...but you do.  The questions they ask are pretty straightforward, it is the assessor's interpretation you need to watch, don't be afraid to add in any relevant information as you recall it.  Try to have examples of real life situations when you have struggled.  Be calm. be yourself, think about you on your bad days.  I was horrendously agitated and stressed prior to my assessment.  I got through it and I was fine.  I am prepared for appeal.  Be strong. You might just be one of the lucky ones that has a caring assessor....yes....apparently they do exist!  Best of luck to you my friend....all will be well.  Just ensure you are supported and you are prepared.  
  • charlie2017charlie2017 Member Posts: 24 Listener
    I basically want to take the form in because there's so much detail in it and I have some memory issues so there is no way I will be able to remember everything in there it took me nearly three weeks to fill it in especially when I'll be a bag of nerves ! So it's not like cheating in an exam it's just to remember to tell them everything. Andrea those comments were awful and yes that's totally stereotyping, u mentioned you were agitated and stressed and I can totally relate to this, we don't expect them to be our friends or even be on anyone's side but there's nothing wrong with them talking to us like civilised humans rather than potential criminals! I will take my claim form and extra notes and tell them I have everything written down so I can remember things cos I get confused and forget things. I don't care how that looks to them really. I'm taking my husband but like you all said I am the expert and when u mentioned the questions are straight forward are they the same questions as what's on the claim form ? Or different ones ? Are they trick questions ? Thanks for all the info guys really appreciate it :-)
  • NystagmiteNystagmite Member Posts: 609 Pioneering
    They will try to trip you up and will make bizarre assumptions. Mine implied my GP and consultants were liars too. Remind me, who has access to my notes?
  • wildlifewildlife Member Posts: 1,316 Pioneering
    charlie2017 They have a standard set of questions but will throw in some curved balls, the trick is to recognize these. I was asked what jobs I did when left school. I am 66 years old so was wondering why on earth that had anything to do with how I am now. The assessor used this in her report to say I had no memory problems. She even used it to say my short term memory was ok. It was also used it to say I would have no problem budgeting. So look out for any question that doesn't directly relate to the claim form or how you are? Like what are your hobbies? There will be a reason why she's asking so remember what you can't do and need help with and stay focused. They will not want as much detail as you put on your claim form as time is an issue for them so don't get upset if you are stopped from giving long answers but still try to tell him/her as much as you can. It's just the way they work.  
  • MatildaMatilda Member Posts: 2,616 Disability Gamechanger
    @charlie2017

    I was asked about hobbies - saying you do craft or jigsaws would indicate considerable manual dexterity.  Asked if I had any pets - would indicate a certain level of physical capacity to look after them, especially dogs.  But then many disabled people have assistance dogs...

    Asked if I found I'd left something in the car when attending an outpatient clinic would I go back for it?  I go to hospital by taxi.

    Did I sometimes not bother to try to chop/peel veg and settle for a sandwich?  No, always persevere trying to chop/peel veg.

    The trickiest was how long can I walk for, not how far?  Watch out for this one.  The length of time you can walk is the time it takes to walk the distance you have said you can walk on bad days before you need to stop and rest.


  • charlie2017charlie2017 Member Posts: 24 Listener
    These random questions seem inate but they're obviously designed to try and "catch ppl out" but then how do u know what they're gonna ask u so yr being put on the spot so that u have to try and think abt what you're saying and how they cud possibly twist it to get out of giving u anything you might be entitled to it seems. Do you mind if I ask any of u ancrually get anything yr entitled to ? 
  • NystagmiteNystagmite Member Posts: 609 Pioneering
    They will twist things. I have tinnitus and said I have the TV on as background noise (also means I don't have to listen to the noise from upstairs) she wrote I watch TV all day, therefore, no concentration difficulties. And because I remember certain things, I have no memory difficulties. 
  • MatildaMatilda Member Posts: 2,616 Disability Gamechanger
    @charlie2017

    At first I was awarded standard rate daily living and mobility for five years.  At Tribunal this was changed to enhanced rate both indefinitely.  So don't despair at your report and award if it's not what you expect.  There is the appeal route where the Tribunal are impartial and examine the evidence all over again with no agenda.
  • lixsharp13lixsharp13 Member Posts: 34 Connected
    Hi everyone im waiting for my pip tribunal date and im dreading it. Ive had the report back from the assesor...and there were lies in it. Im so stressed about it but i dont feel i can give in
  • charlie2017charlie2017 Member Posts: 24 Listener
    Hi what did they lie about ? Totally agree that you shouldn't give in and I will do same if need be. Good on you and I know what you mean about stress it's very wrong that we have to do this 
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