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Doctor won't give information, says DWP will contact him?

col1961col1961 Member Posts: 4 Listener
edited May 2018 in PIP, DLA and AA
Hi could anybody tell me if this has happened to them im filling in my pip form and ive asked my doctor for information but he has told me not to worry about any of that they will contact him ???

Replies

  • wilkowilko Member Posts: 2,284 Disability Gamechanger
    That's correct, but do send copies of any recent upto two to three years old medical reports or letters relating to your condition not appointment letters. These may be from a consultant, specialist nurse, Physo that support your medical condition. Don't be shy at giving personal details on how your condition affects your daily living. Be honest because you will be asked to justify the answers you give in your applecation form at your Face 2Face acessment.
  • BsyddBsydd Member Posts: 3 Listener
    Hi DWP will write to your Doctor for a medical report.
    Bsydd
  • WaylayWaylay Member Posts: 922 Pioneering
    @wilko and @Bsydd Actually, it's the assessment companies who write to your GP/other medical people, and they hardly ever do it these days. See this news item: https://www.disabilitynewsservice.com/the-pip-files-dwp-documents-show-absolutely-shocking-failure-on-further-evidence/

    If you can get a useful letter from your GP, I would do so.
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    wilko said:
    That's correct, but do send copies of any recent upto two to three years old medical reports or letters relating to your condition not appointment letters. These may be from a consultant, specialist nurse, Physo that support your medical condition. Don't be shy at giving personal details on how your condition affects your daily living. Be honest because you will be asked to justify the answers you give in your applecation form at your Face 2Face acessment.
    I totally disagree sorry. They very rarely contact anyone for medical evidence, the onus is on the claimant to make sure they send evidence to support their claim.
    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • whistleswhistles Member Posts: 1,590 Disability Gamechanger
    edited May 2018
    I was led to believe it's up to the claimant to provide all necessary evidence.
    Not everyone has up to date information!! So send what you have to hand. 

    They rarely contact the gp for further stuff. They might do to assesses how long to give you the award for and if it's likely to be present at the time. 
    If you provide everything in the beginning they won't need to.
    It probably isn't your gp that diagnosed your condition it will be your consultant. The gp will be dealing with your medication. So include all medication as well.
    Do not follow me, I don't know where I am going.
  • Government_needs_reformGovernment_needs_reform Member Posts: 858 Pioneering
    Also to add, DWP statistics suggested that ATOS only sought additional medical evidence from the claimants health care professionals in about 25% of claims, more worryingly only about 25% of doctors actually replied.

    Whether Maximus will use this facility more and with more success is something that we will only understand with time.

    You can access your own medical records.

    Supporting evidence – particularly medical – can make a crucial difference to the success of a benefits claim or appeal.

    Decision makers at the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) and assessors who carry out face-to-face assessments may have little knowledge and are very unlikely to have any specialist knowledge, so your evidence is vital in helping assessors understand how you are affected.

    Supporting evidence for disability benefit claims can be useful when making a new or renewal PIP or ESA claim or when you are appealing against a decision that you are not entitled to one of these benefits. Supporting evidence can come in the form of:
     Statement from a carer, friend or family member
     Personal statement and/or diary
     Medical evidence.

    Medical evidence is the most important form of evidence you should try to obtain. Medical evidence usually takes the form of a letter/report from your GP, consultant or other healthcare professional. Please note that some healthcare professionals will make a charge for this.

    The DWP may contact your GP or healthcare professional to obtain medical evidence when you submit a PIP or ESA claim, but in many cases they will not. More and more people claiming benefits are expected to obtain their own supporting evidence.

    If you feel that your healthcare professional would be willing to write a letter of support that you can send in with your claim, we recommend that you ask them. Not all healthcare professionals are able or willing to write supporting letters and they are not obliged to do so, but it is worth asking them to see if they will.
    ⬇️
    I created one of the campaign election videos for Labour, and Jeremy Corbyn,
    This is a new version of Emeli Sande, Hope "You Are Not Alone
    I highlighted everything that's wrong with this country from benefits, NHS, UC etc, but now we have to put up with the hate now that is the Tories. 

    You can see the video here.
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=P5o8hRHh9IY


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  • mikehughescqmikehughescq Member Posts: 5,914 Disability Gamechanger
    Assessment providers will not routinely contact a GP. Moreover it’s largekt irrelevant. What can your GP tell them about your daily living and mobility issues?
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