PIP, DLA and AA
If this is your first visit, check out the community guide. You will have to Join us or Sign in before you can post.

Tribunal appeal rejected for epilepsy

PetPet Member Posts: 16 Listener
edited June 2018 in PIP, DLA and AA
Was given only 0 points which I wasn't very happy with anyway, but after all the stress decided to not bother any further.  This however, brought on a bad day epileptic seizure where I spent 2 days in hospital.  My driving licence has been revoked for a year, and have just been to the doctor who has decided that after trying all the medication available but l am still having seizures, that I should try some kind of surgery.  I have just had the dates for my MRI and EEG.  I have temporal lobe epilepsy.  Would anyone think it would be worth contacting the DWP for review of my claim or wasting my time.  The stress usually brings on seizures.   

Replies

  • ataloss2018ataloss2018 Member Posts: 48 Courageous
    Nothing ventured nothing gained, just put in a new claim and back it up with as much evidence as you can.  Good luck.
  • markyboymarkyboy Member Posts: 368 Pioneering
    The trouble with PIP is that it's not about conditions or procedures you have had it's about how your condition affects your ability to carry out the descriptors in the PIP criteria
  • mikehughescqmikehughescq Member Posts: 5,968 Disability Gamechanger
    markyboy said:
    The trouble with PIP is that it's not about conditions or procedures you have had it's about how your condition affects your ability to carry out the descriptors in the PIP criteria
    DLA was identical. Disability benefits have always been based on the consequences of a condition.
  • lillybellelillybelle Member Posts: 458 Pioneering
    Most certainly put in for another claim
  • mikehughescqmikehughescq Member Posts: 5,968 Disability Gamechanger
    Most certainly put in for another claim
    And throw away how much in potential arrears?

    First question is how long ago was the actual decision?
  • TopkittenTopkitten Member Posts: 1,263 Pioneering
    Epilepsy is a difficult one because, if treated properly, it can have no effect on your life at all. My last partner was one of the majority of epilepsy sufferers who respond well to mainstream medication and settle down to a normal life with no drawbacks. The major problems with it are in it's initial diagnosis and treatment and the potential problems if you have to change medication at some point and have problems with the new medication. PIP is aimed at permanent conditions that are not treatable rather than those which can be treated ok.

    Getting benefits for epilepsy will always be difficult because you would have to prove you will not respond to medication in the way most do. A hard task I suspect.

    TK
    "I'm on the wrong side of heaven and the righteous side of hell" - from Wrong side of heaven by Five Finger Death Punch.
  • mikehughescqmikehughescq Member Posts: 5,968 Disability Gamechanger
    edited June 2018
    To be fair it was relatively straightforward under DLA and the recent safety decision means PIP look at it the same way. Show that you are unable to put yourself in a safe place and that you’re non-functioning for a period afterward and you have the points. 
  • lillybellelillybelle Member Posts: 458 Pioneering
    TK
    in sorry but I totally disagree with the wording of your comment.
    Even if treated “properly” a person with epilepsy is allways at risk . Swimming, bathing, etc.
     Medication makes sufferers like me tired and epileptics that have seizures under control can still have rapid eye movements or some uncontrolled movements.
    Therefore the safety aspect of epilepsy is quite high.
    yes - I agree some can lead normal lives, but so can other people who have disabilities.
    i have had epilepsy since the age of 12. I have worked, married, 3 children, even been able to drive whilst still taking medication
    however there were still days eg- when I hadn’t had enough sleep when I felt Abit jumpy and on those days I was sensible to know that I would never drive a car. 
    then something triggered it off again and now I’m back to not being able to cook whilst alone, bathe etc 
    So i don’t agree it’s a life time problem 
    The safety aspect is allways there. 
  • YadnadYadnad Posts: 2,856 Member

    Topkitten said:
    Epilepsy is a difficult one because, if treated properly, it can have no effect on your life at all. My last partner was one of the majority of epilepsy sufferers who respond well to mainstream medication and settle down to a normal life with no drawbacks. The major problems with it are in it's initial diagnosis and treatment and the potential problems if you have to change medication at some point and have problems with the new medication. PIP is aimed at permanent conditions that are not treatable rather than those which can be treated ok.

    Getting benefits for epilepsy will always be difficult because you would have to prove you will not respond to medication in the way most do. A hard task I suspect.

    TK

    For the same reason that I gave in a thread relating to being a Type 1 diabetic. claiming that the fear of an overdose (hypo) was too great to bear and have any form of life. 
  • YadnadYadnad Posts: 2,856 Member
    edited June 2018
    TK
    in sorry but I totally disagree with the wording of your comment.
    Even if treated “properly” a person with epilepsy is allways at risk . Swimming, bathing, etc.
     Medication makes sufferers like me tired and epileptics that have seizures under control can still have rapid eye movements or some uncontrolled movements.
    Therefore the safety aspect of epilepsy is quite high.
    yes - I agree some can lead normal lives, but so can other people who have disabilities.
    i have had epilepsy since the age of 12. I have worked, married, 3 children, even been able to drive whilst still taking medication
    however there were still days eg- when I hadn’t had enough sleep when I felt Abit jumpy and on those days I was sensible to know that I would never drive a car. 
    then something triggered it off again and now I’m back to not being able to cook whilst alone, bathe etc 
    So i don’t agree it’s a life time problem 
    The safety aspect is allways there. 

    You could say the same for a Type 1 insulin dependent Diabetic. There is always the real risk of having a hypo which if not treated will result in coma and death. Such a patient should be able to avoid that happening.  Someone who suffers from a hypo is so disoriented that he/she will not be able to take on board what is happening and thus will not function and be able to go to a safe place. In fact they need the help of another to either give them an injection to increase the glucose content of their blood or summon an ambulance. For hours after recovery you will sill feel drained and unable to function.
    I should know I have at least two a week, normally at 3am and need my wife to help me from going into a coma.


    Now I will be the first to say that does not get you any points under PIP.  Well three times I have been assessed and three times they have discounted Diabetes and everything that comes with it as being a disability.
    If however if it would warrant points I do wonder how many Type 1 sufferers there are in the UK who should be making a PIP claim?
Sign in or join us to comment.