PIP Assessment — Scope | Disability forum
Find out how to let us know if you're concerned about another member's safety.

PIP Assessment

jazzyjaffas
jazzyjaffas Member Posts: 9 Listener
edited June 2018 in PIP, DLA, and AA
Hi all,
Just wondering if anyone can offer me any help/advice/experiences re: the pip assessment. I'm currently receiving DLA high care, and low mobility. I have the following: Type 1 diabetes, coeliac disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, high blood pressure, polycystic ovary disease, and depression/anxiety. I also currently use a walking stick for my painful joints.
Honestly, i'm absolutely terrified. I'm 24 years old and i feel as though that will play against me, because the majority of my illnesses are invisible making me look like a 'regular' 24 year old bar the walking stick. I'm just wondering if anyone with any similar illnesses have had their assessment and how it went? Or just how you assessment went in general? It's all just a really nerve wracking experience.

Comments

  • poppy123456
    poppy123456 Member Posts: 28,369 Disability Gamechanger
    Hi,

    PIP isn't awarded based on a diagnosis, it's how your conditions affect you daily. You can't compare 2 people when it comes to PIP because everyone's different. What might affect one person with the same condition may not affect another person.

    Have you look at the PIP descriptors to see where you could score those points? There's a PIP self test online that you can complete, it's only a guide but it will give you some idea. http://www.mybenefitsandwork.co.uk/pip/indexxx.php

    Did you send in evidence to support your claim? They rarely contact anyone for this, the onus is on you to make sure it's sent.

    During your assessment they'll ask you questions based on the PIP descriptors on how your condition affects you daily. You should try to answer those questions with as much detail as possible and try to avoid answering with just a yes or no.

    As you have physical disabilities if you're asked to do something that causes you pain, you should refuse and tell them why you can't do it.

    This may also help.

    Good luck.


  • wilko
    wilko Member Posts: 2,447 Disability Gamechanger
    Great reply poppy123456, to the point spot on no need to give false hope, keep posting we all need these snippets of Infomation .
  • Yadnad
    Yadnad Posts: 2,856 Connected

    During your assessment they'll ask you questions based on the PIP descriptors on how your condition affects you daily. You should try to answer those questions with as much detail as possible and try to avoid answering with just a yes or no.

    As you have physical disabilities if you're asked to do something that causes you pain, you should refuse and tell them why you can't do it.

    Agreed Poppy, but if the assessor wants to run the assessment along the lines of a closed question system, you will be hard pushed to give anything but a yes/no answer. The assessor will have moved on to the next question before you even start trying to give more details.

    Be very careful how you refuse such a request. You don't want the assessor to even think that you are playing awkward by not co-operating. Such thoughts could lead to the termination of the assessment and an automatic refusal by the DWP of the claim.

Brightness

Complete our feedback form and tell us how we can make the community better.

Do you need advice on your energy costs?


Scope’s Disability Energy Support service is open to any disabled household in England or Wales in which one or more disabled people live. You can get free advice from an expert adviser on managing energy debt, switching tariffs, contacting your supplier and more. Find out more information by visiting our
Disability Energy Support webpage.