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Sinead_90
Sinead_90 Member Posts: 4 Listener
How is it best or easiest to explain to a complete stranger about a number of mental heath issues or disabilities I suffer with?
 I'm only in my late 20 and I am still struggling with them myself any advice on this would be greatly appreciated 

Comments

  • Misscleo
    Misscleo Member Posts: 647 Pioneering
    It's difficult to talk to a none disabled person about our problems
    Mostly cos none disabled people couldn't hive a s.... about us. 
  • Topkitten
    Topkitten Member Posts: 1,285 Pioneering
    Discussing invisible problems with anyone ranges from difficult to impossible and the best thing to do is not to try, just do so when you have to for example when claiming benefits or asking for help. Most people do not want a long description of things and generally only expect a few words to cover the description when asking how you are. My sister always berated me about going into long descriptions of what was wrong at any given time because she wasn't really interested and didn't want to know. If family are like that how can you expect a complete stranger to be interested?

    TK
    "I'm on the wrong side of heaven and the righteous side of hell" - from Wrong side of heaven by Five Finger Death Punch.
  • Yadnad
    Yadnad Posts: 2,856 Connected
    edited July 2018
    Sinead_90 said:
    How is it best or easiest to explain to a complete stranger about a number of mental heath issues or disabilities I suffer with?
     I'm only in my late 20 and I am still struggling with them myself any advice on this would be greatly appreciated 
    Absolutely impossible mostly.
    Try explaining to someone who has never experienced mental health difficulties with what is going on in your head, how you see things, your feelings, and your thoughts.

    I have been told to get on with it, stop skivving, pull yourself together, you are strange, and a whole host of other comments.

    The only time I felt 'normal' was when I was under section and when I used to spend 5 days a week in the local Mental Health Day Service Unit. I was with people who did understand because they were feeling the same.

    And when I attempted to explain to a so called 'Health Assessor' when claiming PIP they disregarded everything I said and came up with approx. 14 reasons why I was not suffering from mental health difficulties.

    After that I just gave up trying to explain - it wasn't worth the argument.


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