Going the Extra Mile — Scope | Disability forum
New to the community? Remember to read our community guidelines and our community house rules.
Concerned about another member's safety or wellbeing? Find out how to let us know.

Going the Extra Mile

Richard_Scope
Richard_Scope Posts: 2,916

Scope community team

Our Cerebral Palsy Information Officer Richard recently participated in (and completed!) the first wheelchair-accessible Royal Parks Half Marathon in London. Today he shares with us his experiences: 

A different lifetime ago I played wheelchair basketball for my city. I enjoyed the physical competitiveness of the sport and was fairly good. Fast forward almost 20 years and I’m comfortable, settled and content that my involvement with sport goes as far as tuning in to Super Sunday at the weekend. That was until I offered the chance to participate in the first wheelchair accessible Royal Parks Half Marathon in London and I accepted the offer. Now I know what you are thinking; why on earth has he done that? All of the training, the distance etc, etc. Well, for some reason I didn’t take any of this into consideration until I did some research. 

Man in a wheelchair and a woman with a Scope t-shirt on posing for a picture by the finish line

Complete with a sense of the fear of the seriously unfit, I began my training in early September based on the advice I had received from my distance cyclist brother-in-law. Pushing laps around my local area and steadily increasing the distance was the order of the day. Slowly but surely, I could feel my myself getting ever so slightly fitter. Not only that but I found myself spending time with me, no distractions, screens, social media. Just me. I was actually paying attention to what I was thinking and feeling, and my local area! Now don't get me wrong, I still dreaded the thought of having to train and dealing with the hills and uneven pavements, and let's not forget the mocking wheelie bins blocking my route just as I had reached something slightly resembling momentum.  With the attitude of a frustrated and overtired toddler, I continued, and the weeks flew towards the day of distance pushing judgement. I thought to myself "I might just be okay, as long as it doesn't rain on the day". 

Race day arrived Sunday 14th October.  Yes, you've guessed it, the rain was like some kind of biblical deluge. In the taxi to Hyde Park, my spirits were low, and I imagined that I would still be trying to complete the race on Monday morning!  

When I arrived, I could not believe just how many people were there, I had absolutely no idea that running long distances in the rain was so popular, it was like some kind of festival but obviously without the live music. It felt as though I’d been adopted into a family, a strange but friendly family one made up of serious athletes and people dressed as daffodils and teddy bears and me. 

Man in a wheelchair and a woman taking part in the marathon

After a time completing the race day administration and getting to the start line, the race began. Before I knew it, the start line was behind me and I was level pegging with a Marvel Superhero who was pushing his sister in what was also her first ever half marathon. The first few miles were fine, and I thought this is going to be great: I’m in London seeing to world- renowned sights up close and personal and the Scope team are cheering me on, as are my fellow competitors. What could go wrong? Mile 7 is what went wrong. My left shoulder started to seize up and just would not do what it has done in times gone past. I slowed to a virtual standstill. Soaked to my underwear, wondering if I will even finish at all. I began to push again slowly and thankfully hit some downhill sections, but it was the support I received from passers-by truly kept me moving to the point that I cannot remember the last 2 miles. I just remember crossing that line. I’d done it, I’d survived! 

Now I’m at home writing this whilst aching and feeling rather fragile. I think to myself did the Royal Parks Half Marathon need me? Of course not! But did I need the half marathon? In a way, I think I did. I learned that I had levels of determination that I had forgotten or didn’t know I had and that life without a bit of a challenge or a target to aim for is, well, not a life I want. 

I believe that we all have that hidden determination and if we support each other the possibilities are almost endless. 

What are the targets that you are aiming for in your life, big or small?

Scope
Specialist Information Officer and Cerebral Palsy Programme Lead

'Concerned about another member's safety or wellbeing? Flag your concerns with us.

Want to tell us about your experience in the community? Talk to our chatbot and let us know. 

Comments

  • Ami2301
    Ami2301 Community Co-Production Group Posts: 7,924 Disability Gamechanger
    Congratulations @Richard_Scope! 👏👏👏👏

    So proud of you! :)
    Disability Gamechanger - 2019
  • Richard_Scope
    Richard_Scope Posts: 2,916

    Scope community team

    Thanks, @Ami2301


    Scope
    Specialist Information Officer and Cerebral Palsy Programme Lead

    'Concerned about another member's safety or wellbeing? Flag your concerns with us.

    Want to tell us about your experience in the community? Talk to our chatbot and let us know. 
  • SethLaa
    SethLaa Member Posts: 111 Courageous
    That was inspirational mate, congratulations and well done.
  • veriterc
    veriterc Member Posts: 211 Pioneering
    What a fantastic story - let's have more!   
  • Sam_Alumni
    Sam_Alumni Scope alumni Posts: 7,682 Disability Gamechanger
    You are awesome! There is no chance I could do this!!!
    Scope
    Senior online community officer
  • Richard_Scope
    Richard_Scope Posts: 2,916

    Scope community team

    Thanks, @Sam_Scope!

    Scope
    Specialist Information Officer and Cerebral Palsy Programme Lead

    'Concerned about another member's safety or wellbeing? Flag your concerns with us.

    Want to tell us about your experience in the community? Talk to our chatbot and let us know. 
  • Jean_OT
    Jean_OT Member Posts: 513 Pioneering
    Well done Richard, I reckon you are soon going to be investing in a racing chair! 

    Jean Merrilees BSc MRCOT

    You can read more of my posts at: https://community.scope.org.uk/categories/ask-an-occupational-therapist

  • Alattherapy
    Alattherapy Member Posts: 6 Listener

    Our Cerebral Palsy Information Officer Richard recently participated in (and completed!) the first wheelchair-accessible Royal Parks Half Marathon in London. Today he shares with us his experiences: 

    A different lifetime ago I played wheelchair basketball for my city. I enjoyed the physical competitiveness of the sport and was fairly good. Fast forward almost 20 years and I’m comfortable, settled and content that my involvement with sport goes as far as tuning in to Super Sunday at the weekend. That was until I offered the chance to participate in the first wheelchair accessible Royal Parks Half Marathon in London and I accepted the offer. Now I know what you are thinking; why on earth has he done that? All of the training, the distance etc, etc. Well, for some reason I didn’t take any of this into consideration until I did some research. 

    Man in a wheelchair and a woman with a Scope t-shirt on posing for a picture by the finish line

    Complete with a sense of the fear of the seriously unfit, I began my training in early September based on the advice I had received from my distance cyclist brother-in-law. Pushing laps around my local area and steadily increasing the distance was the order of the day. Slowly but surely, I could feel my myself getting ever so slightly fitter. Not only that but I found myself spending time with me, no distractions, screens, social media. Just me. I was actually paying attention to what I was thinking and feeling, and my local area! Now don't get me wrong, I still dreaded the thought of having to train and dealing with the hills and uneven pavements, and let's not forget the mocking wheelie bins blocking my route just as I had reached something slightly resembling momentum.  With the attitude of a frustrated and overtired toddler, I continued, and the weeks flew towards the day of distance pushing judgement. I thought to myself "I might just be okay, as long as it doesn't rain on the day". 

    Race day arrived Sunday 14th October.  Yes, you've guessed it, the rain was like some kind of biblical deluge. In the taxi to Hyde Park, my spirits were low, and I imagined that I would still be trying to complete the race on Monday morning!  

    When I arrived, I could not believe just how many people were there, I had absolutely no idea that running long distances in the rain was so popular, it was like some kind of festival but obviously without the live music. It felt as though I’d been adopted into a family, a strange but friendly family one made up of serious athletes and people dressed as daffodils and teddy bears and me. 

    Man in a wheelchair and a woman taking part in the marathon

    After a time completing the race day administration and getting to the start line, the race began. Before I knew it, the start line was behind me and I was level pegging with a Marvel Superhero who was pushing his sister in what was also her first ever half marathon. The first few miles were fine, and I thought this is going to be great: I’m in London seeing to world- renowned sights up close and personal and the Scope team are cheering me on, as are my fellow competitors. What could go wrong? Mile 7 is what went wrong. My left shoulder started to seize up and just would not do what it has done in times gone past. I slowed to a virtual standstill. Soaked to my underwear, wondering if I will even finish at all. I began to push again slowly and thankfully hit some downhill sections, but it was the support I received from passers-by truly kept me moving to the point that I cannot remember the last 2 miles. I just remember crossing that line. I’d done it, I’d survived! 

    Now I’m at home writing this whilst aching and feeling rather fragile. I think to myself did the Royal Parks Half Marathon need me? Of course not! But did I need the half marathon? In a way, I think I did. I learned that I had levels of determination that I had forgotten or didn’t know I had and that life without a bit of a challenge or a target to aim for is, well, not a life I want. 

    I believe that we all have that hidden determination and if we support each other the possibilities are almost endless. 

    What are the targets that you are aiming for in your life, big or small?


  • Alattherapy
    Alattherapy Member Posts: 6 Listener
    Hello Richard that was amazing story, congratulations and all the best for the future. 

  • Topkitten
    Topkitten Member Posts: 1,285 Pioneering
    Congratulations and well done.

    I must admit though to being a little peeved by the amount of help and support available to those disabled able to join in with such sporting events compared to the rest of us unable to do so who get left out in the cold. It is just not possible to join in such things with any major or even minor spinal condition or with some back and arthritic issues. Going any distance in a manual wheelchair (especially at speed) is just not possible when you cannot use your hands properly or by doing so considerably aggravate the condition.

    I hp[e those able to benefit from such stories appreciate the comments you have made and apologise for my overly negative attitude.

    TK
    "I'm on the wrong side of heaven and the righteous side of hell" - from Wrong side of heaven by Five Finger Death Punch.

Brightness

Do you need advice on your energy costs?


Scope’s Disability Energy Support service is open to any disabled household in England or Wales in which one or more disabled people live. You can get free advice from an expert adviser on managing energy debt, switching tariffs, contacting your supplier and more. Find out more information by visiting our
Disability Energy Support webpage.

Fancy a chat in our virtual coffee lounge?

Put the kettle on and have a chat in our coffee lounge with other members. We talk about hobbies, games and anything else you can think of!

Cerebral Palsy (CP) Online Cafe

Here's a new opportunity for people with CP or a similar disability (aged 20+) to get together and chat. The sessions are in partnership with CP Sport so you can find out more and meet people from both organisations.

Are you struggling?

Read our 'Coping with stress, low mood and isolation' support thread for a run-down of ideas on how to banish those blues and feel happier.

What do you think about the community?

Complete our feedback form and tell us how we can make the community a better space for you.

Information about COVID-19

If you have questions about the virus, please read our information and support which includes guidance on benefits, getting food and essentials and Cerebral Palsy.

Back to school this September?

Read tips on how to settle back in and handle any worries you or your children might be having this new term.