PIP, DLA and AA
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Pip mobility

chaojxmchaojxm Member Posts: 11 Listener
Hi 
my husband has suffered with copd for over 6 years and I’ll health retired 
he suffered a lung collapse and was admitted to the London heart lung hospital for surgery 
since then he has claimed dla 
he has now been sent a form to apply for pip 
he has a mobility vehicle which he relys on to get him around as to use public transport he would be far to exhausting as he cannot walk more than 50 metres on a good day on a bad day it is considerably less it is a struggle to get out of the chair to the wc or kitchen or feels that breathless even in bed we are worried sick about this transfer to pip as he will be isolated at home not being able get to appointments shopping visiting family 
he is currently under the royal papworth hospital which 51.5 from where we live our nearest hospital is in King’s Lynn 10miles away
i am on oxygen therapy and nebuliser several times a day along with a lot of medication including pumps steroids
I’m completing the forms at the moment can you give me some advice on completing it please
many thanks  
chaojxm

Replies

  • RoddyRoddy Member Posts: 389 Pioneering
    Hi @choojxm
    Completing the PIP forms can be a daunting task, and so please take your time and think about your answers before adding them. It can be a good idea to keep a 2 or 3 week diary of events, writing down how your Husband's disabilities affect him on a 24hr basis. Just note things down each day and add the records together with the completed form... One thing further I can add, is if your Husband states that he can walk further than 20 metres he may be considered fit enough to lose his higher rate of Mobility component. 50 metres to an 'assessor' equals 'fit enough to walk!'  Stupid, I know, but just be careful what you write down. I'd also advise you to photocopy everything that you send, so that you can refer to it at a later date if or when you make any further claims in the future... Good Luck, and I hope that you're successful.
  • chaojxmchaojxm Member Posts: 11 Listener
    Thank you for the advice I will take this onboard I will keep you updated 
  • chaojxmchaojxm Member Posts: 11 Listener
    Sorry again should I also put the he has only 30% lung function 
  • RoddyRoddy Member Posts: 389 Pioneering
    chaojxm said:
    Thank you for the advice I will take this onboard I will keep you updated 
    It's slightly bad, I know, but it's best to exaggerate things ever-so-slightly and to cover EVERY challenge that your Husband faces every day and throughout it... The chances are that you'll be interviewed face to face with an assessor. That's also why it is best to photocopy your forms so that you can recall what you wrote down and sent to them. Send copies of EVERY medical notes/diagnosis's that you have, and hospital appointments etc. The more documents that you have to back-up your claims, the better... They will be assessing your Husband's disabilities 'now' 'today' and not yesterday or what he has been through before. If you need more room to explain things than is on the form, simply use more paper and send them with the form too. 
  • chaojxmchaojxm Member Posts: 11 Listener
  • blessedblessed Member Posts: 2 Listener
    Hiya
    Newby so please bare with me.
    Hubby had pip assessment a few weeks ago,letter today and he has 12 for mobility and 11 for daily living.
    Assessor basically has been far from truthful and in fact lied blatantly about his assessment.
    Hubby has long term chronic depression and anxiety,he had a stroke and heart attack nearly 2 years ago,cant walk or move his arm or hand,insulin dependant diabetic,Osteoporosis,Osteoarthritis,metal plate in leg new hip after a recent fall the list goes on.
    Basically i have to do everything now as he cant drive nor me,so have to arrange transport for his hospital and doctors appointments etc,
    I get carers allowance too.
    Problem is i think we should ask for a mandatory reconsideration thing but dont know how he will cope with the stress of it all.
    I have heard that some people have actually had their pip reduced after a MR So im unsure if i should push for it.
    Any advice please?
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    blessed said:
    Hiya
    Newby so please bare with me.
    Hubby had pip assessment a few weeks ago,letter today and he has 12 for mobility and 11 for daily living.
    Assessor basically has been far from truthful and in fact lied blatantly about his assessment.
    Hubby has long term chronic depression and anxiety,he had a stroke and heart attack nearly 2 years ago,cant walk or move his arm or hand,insulin dependant diabetic,Osteoporosis,Osteoarthritis,metal plate in leg new hip after a recent fall the list goes on.
    Basically i have to do everything now as he cant drive nor me,so have to arrange transport for his hospital and doctors appointments etc,
    I get carers allowance too.
    Problem is i think we should ask for a mandatory reconsideration thing but dont know how he will cope with the stress of it all.
    I have heard that some people have actually had their pip reduced after a MR So im unsure if i should push for it.
    Any advice please?
    That award means he's 1 point short of Enhanced daily living. You really do need to get some face to face advice because no one on an internet forum can tell you if there's any risks to his current award by requesting the MR because no one knows exactly how his conditions affect him.

    This link will help you know what's available in your area. https://advicelocal.uk/

    Proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice I have given to members here on the community.
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    @chaojxm please don't slightly exaggerate, tell it how it is and be truthful is the best advice anyone can give you.

    PIP is about how your conditions affect you at least 50% of the time over a 12 month period. Do be aware that the Enhanced mobility is 20 metres for PIP, where it was 50 metres for DLA.

    When filling out the form put as much information as possible about how his conditions affect him. Adding 2-3 real life examples of what happened the last time he attempted that activity for each descriptor that applies to him.

    Future hospital appointment letters are not classed as evidence, this is because it doesn't tell them anything other than they have an appointment sometime in the future.

    Good luck with the claim and if you have anymore questions please do head over to the DLA/PIP part of the forum and i'm sure someone will answer any questions you have.
    Proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice I have given to members here on the community.
  • chaojxmchaojxm Member Posts: 11 Listener
  • nicolafhurstnicolafhurst Member Posts: 29 Connected
    Hi I’m disabled as well so when u fill the form out u have to put your husband s worse days as I every day I was told that from the pip people over the phone before they sent the form out as they only listen to sometimes or good day s how true this is I don’t know as with me I’m poorly everyday due to me not being able to do anything I have to rely on family to do things for me just be careful filling it out and when u have the asser out record it all with out them knowing as I was told this by my doctor after my assessment and u don’t need to tell them either x
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    Hi I’m disabled as well so when u fill the form out u have to put your husband s worse days as I every day I was told that from the pip people over the phone before they sent the form out as they only listen to sometimes or good day s how true this is I don’t know as with me I’m poorly everyday due to me not being able to do anything I have to rely on family to do things for me just be careful filling it out and when u have the asser out record it all with out them knowing as I was told this by my doctor after my assessment and u don’t need to tell them either x
    I'm sorry but that's not great advice.  filling out the form as if it's your worst day is possibly the worst thing you can do and coupld possibly be fraud. Never ever base anything like this on your worst day. PIP is about how your conditions affect you at least 50% of the time over a 12 month period. You should always been honest and tell the truth.

    Secretly recording the assessment could lead to all sorts of problems if they catch you doing this. If caught, your assessment will be stopped, your file returned to DWP and you'll very likely be refused that benefit.

    Always ring the health assessment providers at least a couple of days before the assessment to tell them that you're recording it. You must then record 2 identical copies using either a CD or tape recorder. One copy must be handed in at the end of the assessment.

    Dictaphones, laptops or phones can not be used to record assessments.
    Proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice I have given to members here on the community.
  • nicolafhurstnicolafhurst Member Posts: 29 Connected
    So sorry didn’t want people to get upset with what I wrote I was only going on what I was told and thought the advice would help as most people who apply for pip are really poorly all the time but the advice I got was if u didn’t explain it like that it could go against u and I had a assessment with a lady who seemed lovely but when I got my report back it was like she had got me mixed up with someone else everything she said I did wasn’t true and it was my doctor who advised me to record it the next time and I asked if I would need to tell them before and he told me no so I believed he must be right so I’m glad u have said that so when I have a assessment in the future again I will let them know first just incase but my parents was with me but they couldn’t be witnesses to me being right as they was with me so it was my word against hers but thank you for explaining that to me at least now I know So thank you
  • chaojxmchaojxm Member Posts: 11 Listener
    Thank you for trying to help I’ve completed the forms now I’ve told them exactly how it is my husband 30% lung capacity and in stage 3 copd which is severe according to the lung foundation and the royal papworth hospital all we can do is wait and if he looses higher rate mobility we will have to appeal
    Many thanks again
  • nicolafhurstnicolafhurst Member Posts: 29 Connected
    I hope it goes well for you and your husband if u have a letter from a doctor or your hospital stating how poorly he is that should help too as I had one from both I’m just waiting for my hearing date from tribunal again good luck I’m sure u will be fine x
  • chaojxmchaojxm Member Posts: 11 Listener
    Thank you hope you’re tribunal goes well🤞
  • nicolafhurstnicolafhurst Member Posts: 29 Connected
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    @nicolafhurst no problem. The issue with filling in the form as if it's your worst day is when you attend the assessment, if it's one of your better days the HCP is likely to see through that. They will then think "well if this is their worst day, then they can't be as bad as they say they are" part of the face to face assessment is visual observations. A GP very rarely knows anything about benefits and face to face assessments. Good luck with the Tribunal.

    @chaojxm good luck with your claim.
    Proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice I have given to members here on the community.
  • nicolafhurstnicolafhurst Member Posts: 29 Connected
    That is so true never looked at it like that thank you x
  • cristobalcristobal Member Posts: 966 Disability Gamechanger
    Roddy said:
    It's slightly bad, I know, but it's best to exaggerate things ever-so-slightly and to cover EVERY challenge that your Husband faces every day and throughout it... The chances are that you'll be interviewed face to face with an assessor. That's also why it is best to photocopy your forms so that you can recall what you wrote down and sent to them. Send copies of EVERY medical notes/diagnosis's that you have, and hospital appointments etc. The more documents that you have to back-up your claims, the better... They will be assessing your Husband's disabilities 'now' 'today' and not yesterday or what he has been through before. If you need more room to explain things than is on the form, simply use more paper and send them with the form too. 

    @Roddy - I don't agree with your suggestions, sorry.

    If you "exaggerate things ever-so-slightly" that is fraudulent (albeit only ever-so-slightly) because you are making a statement that isn't true.

    Also if you send "copies of EVERY medical note and diagnosis's" I don't believe that these will add anything, unless they specifically address a lack of functionality. DWP specifically state that appointment letters are of no use.

    My advice would be to tell the truth. Whether you get PIP, or not, you will still have your honesty left once the process is complete.



  • chaojxmchaojxm Member Posts: 11 Listener
  • RoddyRoddy Member Posts: 389 Pioneering
    cristobal said:
    Roddy said:
    It's slightly bad, I know, but it's best to exaggerate things ever-so-slightly and to cover EVERY challenge that your Husband faces every day and throughout it... The chances are that you'll be interviewed face to face with an assessor. That's also why it is best to photocopy your forms so that you can recall what you wrote down and sent to them. Send copies of EVERY medical notes/diagnosis's that you have, and hospital appointments etc. The more documents that you have to back-up your claims, the better... They will be assessing your Husband's disabilities 'now' 'today' and not yesterday or what he has been through before. If you need more room to explain things than is on the form, simply use more paper and send them with the form too. 

    @Roddy - I don't agree with your suggestions, sorry.

    If you "exaggerate things ever-so-slightly" that is fraudulent (albeit only ever-so-slightly) because you are making a statement that isn't true.

    Also if you send "copies of EVERY medical note and diagnosis's" I don't believe that these will add anything, unless they specifically address a lack of functionality. DWP specifically state that appointment letters are of no use.

    My advice would be to tell the truth. Whether you get PIP, or not, you will still have your honesty left once the process is complete.


    Each to their own, and I'm not suggesting for one minute that anybody should tell lies. It's just that it's very difficult for some to explain their own diagnosis in words, as best that it NEEDS to be explained. If this wasn't the case then so many people would NOT be losing the entitlements. Sending copies of medical diagnosis's and specialist notes, most certainly do help a claim, and many claims are refused due to insufficient medical evidence.

  • nicolafhurstnicolafhurst Member Posts: 29 Connected
    Medical notes definitely help and if your doctor and hospital nurse / doctor write s a letter stating how poorly u are that really helps as I’ve got all that now just waiting for my tribunal date so I’m hoping that helps me know but I know friends who has done this and it’s helped so much but definitely each to there own x
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