Disability aids, equipment and technology
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Travelling with Mobility Scooter or electric wheelchair

linlin01linlin01 Member Posts: 38 Courageous
Hi,

Anyone able to advise me on travelling down to London from Leeds by train using a mobility scooter or electric wheelchair?  It's my daughter's graduation in the summer and I'm keen to go.  Need to do some planning.  I don't go out much at the moment, just locally on my scooter - I can only walk a few yards.  

And has anyone had experience of taxis taking mobility scooters?  Cant seem to find one in Leeds that will take mine, although they all say they would take me in a wheelchair.

I'm wondering whether it might be easier to source an electric wheelchair for the trip as the transport systems appear to be more accommodating to wheelchairs than scooters.  This might not be the case of course.

No one I know is strong enough to do all the pushing required in a manual one (I'm tall), and I don't have the strength in my arms to propel myself either.

Thanks all

:):):)

Replies

  • shirleyt214shirleyt214 Member Posts: 14 Connected
    Trains don't normally like to take scooters either. It's to do with maneuverability and the size of turning circles. Wheelchairs, manuals or powerchairs have much smaller turning circles than scooters. As far as I'm aware, buses, taxis, teams are all the same.
    Shirley Todd
  • linlin01linlin01 Member Posts: 38 Courageous
    edited January 2020
    Thanks shirleyt214  :)
  • TopkittenTopkitten Member Posts: 1,263 Pioneering
    Whether you can use a scooter or not will depend largely on it's size. Some fold down quite small and fit into the boot of a car but a much larger number do not. However, the smaller ones do not usually have such a good battery life as the batteries are also smaller and lighter.

    Most towns and cities will have places where scooters can be rented and this may be a better option but do remember that a lot of travel in London assumes access to the underground which is not very wheelchair / scooter friendly having been designed and built many years ago.

    TK
    "I'm on the wrong side of heaven and the righteous side of hell" - from Wrong side of heaven by Five Finger Death Punch.
  • Chloe_ScopeChloe_Scope Scope Posts: 10,652 Disability Gamechanger
    Hi @linlin01, I hope you can make your daughters graduation too! It would definitely be advised to book train assistance, you do this by ringing up which can beneficial to ensure everything is correct. Here is how to book assistance and the size of wheelchairs/scooters that are allowed on their trains.
    Community Partner
    Scope

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  • linlin01linlin01 Member Posts: 38 Courageous
    Thanks, everyone!  I will remember those tips as I prepare for my journey. Not been further than 10 miles for several years but am feeling very determimed 😊 
  • linlin01linlin01 Member Posts: 38 Courageous
    Determined!!!!!
  • yvonne9yvonne9 Member Posts: 7 Listener
    I take my scooter everywhere took it to Australia twice and never had any problems
  • linlin01linlin01 Member Posts: 38 Courageous
    Thanks for you encouraging reply @yvonne9. What model of scooter do you use? And it's the practicalities that concern me as I will usually be travelling alone. For example getting scooter into and out of taxi - who does that and how? Getting scooter onto and off train - who does that and how?  I cant lift much myself - how do you manage? Thanks 😊
  • Rifi7Rifi7 Member Posts: 188 Pioneering
    Hi Linlin,
    I’m having the same problems as you. I like to use my scooter more than my electric wheelchair because my scooter has a basket on the front so I can independently shop. I have got a travelscoot which is one of the lightest, smallest scooters. It can fold up and go in a golf bag and can go in car boots and aeroplanes. The trouble with all scooters that can fold away, is that my experiences that is for disabled people, they are still to heavy. I have managed to find a black cab who is willing to take my scooter but it’s not always easy to arrange to book him for jobs.

    I know many people say that you can hire scooters when you get to places, but our problem is how do you get there in the first place if you can’t manually use a wheelchair and if your electric one is to heavy.  Personally I would rather get around places in my scooter than my wheelchair, but that’s just me. 

    I will still investigate ways of travelling in wheelchair so I will give you any information, should I find it.
  • linlin01linlin01 Member Posts: 38 Courageous
    Thanks Rifi7 said:
    Hi Linlin,
    I’m having the same problems as you. I like to use my scooter more than my electric wheelchair because my scooter has a basket on the front so I can independently shop. I have got a travelscoot which is one of the lightest, smallest scooters. It can fold up and go in a golf bag and can go in car boots and aeroplanes. The trouble with all scooters that can fold away, is that my experiences that is for disabled people, they are still to heavy. I have managed to find a black cab who is willing to take my scooter but it’s not always easy to arrange to book him for jobs.

    I know many people say that you can hire scooters when you get to places, but our problem is how do you get there in the first place if you can’t manually use a wheelchair and if your electric one is to heavy.  Personally I would rather get around places in my scooter than my wheelchair, but that’s just me. 

    I will still investigate ways of travelling in wheelchair so I will give you any information, should I find it.

    Thanks for that #Rifi7 you mention a black cab. Does the driver lift the scooter in or wheel it up a ramp, and then where do you sit? Thanks, Lynne 😊
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