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PIP assessment

EllsDK
EllsDK Member Posts: 11 Listener
Just wondered if anyone could tell me if the PIP assessor you see for your f2f has access to your completed PIP form before they assess you. TIA 

Comments

  • wilko
    wilko Member Posts: 2,452 Disability Gamechanger
    The PIP assessor has your application to view on his or her computer screen, and you will be asked questions relating to your answers given in the application form in relation to each of the PIP descriptors to confirm your abilities to cope manage the activities described in the PIP descriptors safely and repeatability and in a timely manner for 50% of the time over a 12 month period. Hope this answers your question. 
  • EllsDK
    EllsDK Member Posts: 11 Listener
    Thanks for the replies. When I had my assessment the assessor told me they didn't have access to the application. It appears it was silly of me to believe that. 
  • EricaMcD
    EricaMcD Member Posts: 32 Courageous
    I know it is difficult to know what an assessor has access to  have access when .  you have your assessment done due to GDPR.  Let the commuity know how you get on after you hear back regarding your application.  There is a lot of support amongst the community.
  • EllsDK
    EllsDK Member Posts: 11 Listener
    Thanks Erica. I've just heard back and it's not good. Hence my question. I've lost all my PIP and cannot believe the things that have been written about me. 
  • [Deleted User]
    [Deleted User] Posts: 0 Connected
    The user and all related content has been deleted.
  • skullcap
    skullcap Posts: 169 Connected
    Try to just not answer yes or no to any assessor. If you do, make sure you follow on with an explanation. I.e. if asked if you can cook a simple meal? Don't just answer "yes" explain if you have difficulties doing it and how it affects you when you do.  Just a simple example I know, but when asked any question, where the descriptors are relevant, always follow up with the what happens and why.
    Good suggestion but I have found that with some assessors they don't want to hear anything after the first part of the answer. By the time you are reeling off the why's and what for the assessor has already started on the next question which you will have partly missed. Do that a few times and you end up just saying yes/no to make sure you are ready for the next question on a different subject.
    It's hard work trying to listen to a new question whilst trying to talk about the previous one.
  • cristobal
    cristobal Member Posts: 984 Disability Gamechanger
    Slight variation on the yes/no answer....

    When asked if you can do something - and you can but maybe only slowly or with some other difficulty - I would answer 'No' rather than 'Yes but ...'

    The assessor will then need to either put 'No' - or ask further questions to clarify your answer.

    (I'm not suggesting anything dishonest - obviously if you can do something without any issues then the answer should be 'Yes')
  • EllsDK
    EllsDK Member Posts: 11 Listener
    Sorry for the delay in replying. Thanks for all your input. I did do all the things suggested, but huge parts of what was written about me doesn't reflect what was actually said. I'm now struggling to get help with completing my MR because all the welfare rights places are shutting down because of coronavirus. 
  • poppy123456
    poppy123456 Member Posts: 29,465 Disability Gamechanger
    For the MR you should put this in writing stating where you think you should have scored those points and your reasons why. Then add a couple of real life examples of what happened the last time you attempted that activity for each descriptor that applies to you.

    You should avoid mentioning any lies/contradictions that may have been told in the report because they won't be interested in any of those.


  • EllsDK
    EllsDK Member Posts: 11 Listener
    For the MR you should put this in writing stating where you think you should have scored those points and your reasons why. Then add a couple of real life examples of what happened the last time you attempted that activity for each descriptor that applies to you.

    You should avoid mentioning any lies/contradictions that may have been told in the report because they won't be interested in any of those.


    I honestly have no idea how I can do it without mentioning those things. I'd just look like I was contradicting /lying about all the descriptors I've lost points on because of what the assessor has said that I've stated for them. Some of it doesn't even make sense. 
  • [Deleted User]
    [Deleted User] Posts: 0 Connected
    The user and all related content has been deleted.
  • skullcap
    skullcap Posts: 169 Connected
    That's a good one. Reminds me of when I was in primary school and had the weekly visit to the swimming baths. Every year I was asked if I could swim a length to which I replied no but I can swim 4 widths - never attempted the lengths.
  • skullcap
    skullcap Posts: 169 Connected
    I forgot to add.
    I was asked if I had a driving licence and said no I sent it back. Then was asked but could you drive, so answered yes. That was used against me.
  • cristobal
    cristobal Member Posts: 984 Disability Gamechanger
    @mikehughescq - in my case I found quite early on that if I answered "yes' to anything quite often the assessor would not allow me to qualify my answer (a bit like in Kavanagh QC once the witness has given the answer that the barrister likes he/she sits down and stops questioning)

    I found it easier to answer 'no' but of course you are correct to point out that 'not reliably' might be a better answer if you can't carry out an activity fully.

    Unfortunately, whilst under pressure during the assessment, that never occurred to me!

    Keep up the good work...
  • Alice_Holt
    Alice_Holt Member Posts: 46 Courageous
    edited March 2020
    EllsDK said
    I honestly have no idea how I can do it without mentioning those things. I'd just look like I was contradicting /lying about all the descriptors I've lost points on because of what the assessor has said that I've stated for them. Some of it doesn't even make sense. 
    Can I take it that you have a copy of the assessment report?     

    I think it should detail towards the start what paperwork / reports the assessor looked, if that doesn't include you PIP2 form, then point that out on the MR.

    Do you have a copy of your PIP2 form? 

    I might phrase it something like:
    (And using a random activity and health condition(s) that may or may not apply to your situation, as an example) 
    The assessment report seem to contain many inaccuracies. On activity 1 it states I can prepare food unaided. My osteoarthritis means I need an aid to help me grip and undo cans / bottles ; it takes me a very long time to prepare and chop vegetables, so my partner will do this.

    The pain in my spine / lower back means I cannot stand at a kitchen work-surface without pain, so I need to sit and use a perching stool, even using this aid I need to pause and rest because of the pain so it takes me more than twice as long to prepare a simple meal than it would my partner.

    Because of my depression and anxiety I lack the motivation to cook myself an adequate meal. Some days I will go with only a snack or even don't eat at all. Other days I will have a sandwich / soup / ready meal. Family members will often leave me a pre-prepared meal and will prompt / encourage me to eat this. My anxiety means my appetite is poor, and this combined with my lack of motivation means I do not do this activity reliably on most days in the week.     

    All this was detailed on my PIP2 form, the assessment is inaccurate in asserting that I am able to do this activity reliably - it has not taken notice of my limitations as explained on my PIP2 form     

    Did you have a copy of your prior PIP award and the points it gave you?
    Did you enclose any medical evidence with your form?
    If so you could add for each activity - 

    My previous PIP award recognised the difficulties I have and awarded 2 points for this activity. My condition has not changed (as stated on my PIP2 form), indeed as time has passed this activity has become more difficult / painful.  The medical evidence I enclosed confirms my condition is ongoing.

    At the end you might conclude by writing:
    It seems to be that the assessment report and the DWP decision maker have not properly considered my PIP2 form, and my previous PIP awards - please could you look again at the decision and fully consider the submitted evidence and the papers attached. The decision seems only to consider the assessors informal observations on the day of the assessment (many of which I think are inaccurate), it has not considered the variability of my condition, and has not looked at the difficulties I experience on the majority of days, nor whether I can do the activities reliably. Additionally there are many inconsistencies in the report [very, very brief example], and comments are generic rather than specific to me, 

    If you have relevant medical evidence to hand that was not send with the PIP report then attach this, and if possible, include a letter from partner / family / friends detailing what help they provide for you around the PIP activities / descriptors.

    Do this type of write up for all relevant activities, ensuring you get to the minimum 8 points.

    If you are sure the report states your PIP form was not consulted, and you have a copy - then you could conclude by re-stating the PIP form was not used to get to the decision, and offering to send it again to the DWP so that the DM considering your MR would have sight of it.   Sometimes the DWP / ATOS, etc loss forms.

    So, this might be a way / template of writing your MR, if you think it appropriate. Delete / amend as appropriate.  Because many advice agencies are closed due to cv, I have written this to give you a view of how your MR might be phrased.



  • cristobal
    cristobal Member Posts: 984 Disability Gamechanger
    I've often wondered if concentrating on the assessor's 'lies' is the reverse of what happens in a criminal case...

    If you're on trial you need do nothing. The prosecution must prove that your guilty beyond reasonable doubt - if you can discredit the prosecution witnesses, and there is insufficient other evidence, the jury may decide that you're not guilty.

    If you apply for PIP the assumption is that you don't qualify and you have to show that you do. 

    If you concentrate on what, in your perception, were lies written by the assessor then even if the decision maker (be this at the DWP or at a tribunal) agrees you're still at the default position i.e. 'no'.

    You still have to show why you should get PIP by  giving examples of what you can/ can't do and what help you need.

  • EllsDK
    EllsDK Member Posts: 11 Listener
    I'm so sorry that I haven't been back to this thread sooner. I've been ill. Thank you so much for your replies. I'm going through them now. 

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