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covid bubble

bas1956
bas1956 Member Posts: 1 Listener
edited August 2020 in Coffee lounge
Hi folks
Just need some advice on forming a bubble.
I live on my own, my partner lives with 3 children  a 14 year old 18 year old and a 21 year old.
The 21 year old has been going out to nights out in Manchester and Leeds.
Am i at greater risk if i form a bubble now.
Thanks Bas

Comments

  • Tori_Scope
    Tori_Scope Posts: 8,262

    Scope community team

    Hi @bas1956

    Here are the government guidelines on meeting people from outside of your household.  I think, ultimately, it's down to what you feel comfortable with, and what you feel is safe. If one of the members of the other household has been putting themselves at greater risk of contracting Covid19, then this is something you might want to carefully consider, as any close contact with them could put you at risk too. Perhaps you could speak to your partner about it, or the 21 year old? I'm sure that you are very keen to spend more time with your partner, so hopefully the situation can be resolved. 

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  • OverlyAnxious
    OverlyAnxious Member Posts: 1,736 Disability Gamechanger
    You're at greater risk of Covid by joining any bubble...however it might be worth the risk if your mental health is suffering from living alone.

    I guess it depends how far along in the relationship you are, but maybe you could consider moving in with your partner, and the 21 y/o living in your property for now if they want to continue going to social events...


  • janer1967
    janer1967 Member Posts: 15,300 Disability Gamechanger
    Hi and welcome to the community, mixing with other households will put you at more risk but I am sure you dont want to be on your own forever so it may be worth taking the plunge.

    The shielding has ended now for those at high risk so there must be some indication that everyone is at less risk now.

    The risk wont go away until everyone has been vaccinated against it and that is a long way off so you cant put your life on hold for that long
  • mikehughescq
    mikehughescq Posts: 8,847 Connected
    janer1967 said:

    The shielding has ended now for those at high risk so there must be some indication that everyone is at less risk now.
    Not sure I agree with that. There’s no science at all around the ending of shielding. Thus the many calls to extend it.
  • woodbine
    woodbine Community Co-Production Group Posts: 7,219 Disability Gamechanger
    Looks like the "R" number is creeping up again, but I think as Ive thought all along that much of it comes down to common sense.
    Be extra nice to new members.
  • OverlyAnxious
    OverlyAnxious Member Posts: 1,736 Disability Gamechanger
    janer1967 said:

    The shielding has ended now for those at high risk so there must be some indication that everyone is at less risk now.
    Not sure I agree with that. There’s no science at all around the ending of shielding. Thus the many calls to extend it.
    It hasn't ended, it's been 'paused'... 

    We're in the calm before the storm.  It's likely to be as safe now as it's ever going to be before the winter sets in and the second wave hits.  Of course, there's no evidence that can prove this as we haven't had a winter of Covid19 yet.  But cold weather, weakened immune systems, seasonal flu and the fact that people can no longer do things outside all suggest a pretty grim winter prediction.

    You also have to consider the long term health impacts on shielding.  If people are to shield until there's a vaccine, that's not likely before next spring at the earliest...  Their mental health will have deteriorated by then, as of course, will their physical health.  

    There is also the financial argument that the economy will be completely ruined by next spring if people don't start using it again now...


    Having said all that, I think it's worth noting that the R rate still varies considerably in different areas of the country.  So ultimately it's down to individuals to decide whether to take the risk or not, and how much of a risk they wish to take.  A walk in a wide open park is obviously much less risky than even an outdoor restaurant visit for example.


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