Life Insurance for the disabled — Scope | Disability forum
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Life Insurance for the disabled

Wizzy75
Wizzy75 Member Posts: 11 Listener
Hi my sister in law suffers from Myotonic dystrophy and is having difficulty finding a life insurance policy due to her disability. Does anybody have any advice as , 1.I would have thought that this is discrimination, 2.Where can she find help with this. I am disabled but I found life insurance, but as she has a long term genetic disorder it seems to be more challenging for her. Any advice would be appreciated.

Comments

  • chiarieds
    chiarieds Member, Community Co-Production Group Posts: 12,478 Disability Gamechanger
    Hi @Wizzy75 - it seems like it might be an idea to discuss this with an insurance broker. There's a little info here, if you scroll down to 'Life Insurance:' https://www.moneyadviceservice.org.uk/en/articles/buying-insurance-if-youre-ill-or-disabled
    Perhaps others will suggest brokers they've used, or where they were able to get life insurance from. :)



  • Chloe_Scope
    Chloe_Scope Scope Posts: 10,545 Disability Gamechanger
    Hi @Wizzy75, is this something you are still struggling to find?
    Scope

  • 66Mustang
    66Mustang Member Posts: 7,401 Disability Gamechanger
    Sorry for the thread hijack but aren’t insurance companies exempt from some discrimination laws? Just wondering as their whole business model revolves around charging people different amounts based on their age, gender, disability status, etc.

    Not saying whether I agree or disagree but discriminating between different types of people seems to be part of the game with insurance.
  • Tori_Scope
    Tori_Scope Posts: 9,644 Scope online community team
    edited October 2020
    The Equality and Human Rights Commission states that:
    In general, an insurance provider must not discriminate against a person because of a protected characteristic in relation to providing them with insurance products or in the terms of the products themselves, for example, premiums and benefits.
    Some exceptions may apply to disability, sex, gender reassignment and pregnancy and maternity. No exceptions apply to the other protected characteristics: race, religion or belief, and sexual orientation.
    Providers of ‘insurance business’ can only justify treating disabled people (including people with a past disability) differently when providing them with insurance if:
    • the different treatment is by reference to relevant information from a source on which it is reasonable for you to rely, and
    • it is reasonable for you to treat the person differently.
    This means it is important to have relevant information from a reliable source when making decisions about offering insurance services to a disabled person. Using untested assumptions, stereotypes or generalisations can lead to unlawful discrimination.
    Interesting stuff! I don't know how it works in practice, though @66Mustang.

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  • 66Mustang
    66Mustang Member Posts: 7,401 Disability Gamechanger
    That is very interesting, thank you @Tori_Scope

    I agree it does look like a very grey area and I guess insurance companies have to have some very good lawyers to help them decide what they can and can’t do!
  • chiarieds
    chiarieds Member, Community Co-Production Group Posts: 12,478 Disability Gamechanger
    Hi @66Mustang - whilst insurance providers aren't supposed to discriminate against disabled people, they are allowed to charge more in some cases. My daughter is a travel agent, &, where a customer has an ongoing health issue, then the cost of holiday insurance costs more, as they are potentially more likely to need treatment if going abroad & falling ill.
    I suppose insurance companies make money because the balance of probabilities is that often a person won't make a claim for a long time, thinking about life insurance if the person doesn't have a life-limiting disorder, or won't become ill when abroad; won't have their house burn down, etc. When the risks are considered higher with those that have certain disabilities, then they charge more to cover themselves. Not 'exactly' discriminating, but built on the model that they will charge less to those at less risk, & more to those considered to be higher risk. Hope that makes sense. :)
  • woodbine
    woodbine Member, Community Co-Production Group Posts: 7,729 Disability Gamechanger
    When my life insurance ran out I took out an over 50's plan, no questions asked and a £100 gift voucher that covered the first 2 years of payments
    Be extra nice to new members.
  • Tori_Scope
    Tori_Scope Posts: 9,644 Scope online community team
    Sounds like a good deal @woodbine!
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  • Parrot123
    Parrot123 Member Posts: 137 Pioneering
    Sunlife if you are over 50 i took one out last year and got £100 gift voucher

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