25th Anniversary of the Disability Discrimination Act, but what still needs to be improved? — Scope | Disability forum
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25th Anniversary of the Disability Discrimination Act, but what still needs to be improved?

Chloe_Scope
Chloe_Scope Scope Posts: 10,557 Disability Gamechanger

 On the 8th November 2020, it’s the 25th Anniversary of the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA). 

The DDA was a landmark piece of legislation that was a result of years of protests and campaigning by disabled people. The act made it unlawful to discriminate against disabled people in relation to employment, the provision of goods and services, education and transport. 

A sign saying disability is future

The DDA has since been replaced by the Equality Act 2010. 

25 years later, what do you think still needs to change to guarantee equality for disabled people? Let us know in the comments below if you'd like your answers to be featured in a Scope blog!

Scope

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Comments

  • Parrot123
    Parrot123 Member Posts: 137 Pioneering

     On the 8th November 2020, it’s the 25th Anniversary of the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA). 

    The DDA was a landmark piece of legislation that was a result of years of protests and campaigning by disabled people. The act made it unlawful to discriminate against disabled people in relation to employment, the provision of goods and services, education and transport. 

    A sign saying disability is future

    The DDA has since been replaced by the Equality Act 2010. 

    25 years later, what do you think still needs to change to guarantee equality for disabled people? Let us know in the comments below if you'd like your answers to be featured in a Scope blog!

    we need more houses for disabled people. Time to stand up and fight back the government do not care about us. i have just got a support worker after battling ill health since 2008 shocking
  • Tori_Scope
    Tori_Scope Posts: 8,195

    Scope community team

    Thank you for sharing @Parrot123. I'm glad you've finally got a support worker, too. 
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  • Parrot123
    Parrot123 Member Posts: 137 Pioneering
    no thank you. Your a gem x
  • Garza
    Garza Member Posts: 149 Pioneering
    I think things are improving for Disabled people, I do think both pieces of legislation are pretty toothless and can be widely ignored or bypassed by those who choose to, enforcement seems to be pretty thin on the ground 

    I would agree with parrot123 in that housing provision for disabled people especially in the social sector needs to be vastly improved
  • Chloe_Scope
    Chloe_Scope Scope Posts: 10,557 Disability Gamechanger
    Thank you for this @Garza. Hopefully this will improve!
    Scope

  • Markmywords
    Markmywords Member Posts: 419 Pioneering
    For me, it's simple; the laws we already have need to be policed proactively and have criminal penalties. Civil law after an event has happened is not working.

    The EHRC is an irrelevant smokescreen and should be disbanded.
  • [Deleted User]
    [Deleted User] Posts: 1,651 Connected
    edited October 2020
    I still can't get a job, every time I declare my disability I get rejected. Also, I've been saying for years that the DDA, and its little Brother the Equality Act 2010, aren't worth the paper they're printed on because the Tories don't enforce them and never will IMO.

    Also, when you're applying to places like the local Council where you're supoosed to get a "guaraunteed" interview under the 2 ticks scheme, the conditions are too harsh IMO, like last year I applied to be a Lollipop Man at a school in Sheffield, I declared my disability for the 2 ticks thing, they never even acnknowledged my application much less give me an interview.

    OK there'd be issues with me being a Lollipop Man due to my disability but that's beside the point, I should've at least gotten a punt on it even if I didn't get it.



  • SallyH
    SallyH Member Posts: 31 Courageous
    Because my disabilities are invisible I've had to deal with people telling me to 'prove' I'm disabled. It would be understandable if I was applying for grants/benefits/money etc, but usually it's just people at work or people who see me use a disabled seat on a train (Only once was it another disabled person who needed the seat, and with them I gave up the seat). Like, what do they want? My referral letter from my psychiatrist? The prescription I need to live a somewhat normal life? The damage my conditions cause to my skin and bank account? 

    And don't get me started on companies like WeWork who don't declare who accessible their offices are for people with physical and mental disabilities. Also, if anyone wishes to know, there's only a few London based Wework offices that ALLOW GUIDE DOGS. Not just normal, untrained dogs. GUIDE DOGS. Y'know, the ones that people need. Nowhere on the site do they explain this discriminatory policy. Nowhere do they talk about accessibility. Nowhere can you find if there's a lift, or stairlift, or anything to help those that have difficulty moving around. Surely if all supermarkets allow guide dogs, a bloody 'Progressive' co-working space should without question. 
  • SylviaMorrison72
    SylviaMorrison72 Member Posts: 17 Connected
    Hi all there's definitely more needs to be done! I'm currently fighting for my money back over a faulty cooker I have been without a cooker since 14th September I'm becoming I'll I'll with it been dealing with it for 2 weeks and been in store although I'm not going out as I have a extremely vulnerable son (23) I also have underlying conditions. I'm not sure if this is right place to post! I try to just get on with it till it becomes a problem! 


  • Graham_Scope
    Graham_Scope Scope Posts: 15 Courageous
    Garza said:
    I think things are improving for Disabled people, I do think both pieces of legislation are pretty toothless and can be widely ignored or bypassed by those who choose to, enforcement seems to be pretty thin on the ground 

    I would agree with parrot123 in that housing provision for disabled people especially in the social sector needs to be vastly improved
    Hi everyone - I'm Graham, I work for Scope, and I'm old enough to remember campaigning for a civil rights act back in the Nineties! Housing was a major gap when the DDA came into force, and campaigners and activists at the time were extremely unhappy that this essential element of independent living was missed out. Housing is still "exempt" from the Equality Act duties - bits of it like landlords not refusing adaptations are covered, but the fundamental right to accessible homes is still not in place. Do you think Scope should be campaigning about this issue?
  • Garza
    Garza Member Posts: 149 Pioneering
    Garza said:
    I think things are improving for Disabled people, I do think both pieces of legislation are pretty toothless and can be widely ignored or bypassed by those who choose to, enforcement seems to be pretty thin on the ground 

    I would agree with parrot123 in that housing provision for disabled people especially in the social sector needs to be vastly improved
    Hi everyone - I'm Graham, I work for Scope, and I'm old enough to remember campaigning for a civil rights act back in the Nineties! Housing was a major gap when the DDA came into force, and campaigners and activists at the time were extremely unhappy that this essential element of independent living was missed out. Housing is still "exempt" from the Equality Act duties - bits of it like landlords not refusing adaptations are covered, but the fundamental right to accessible homes is still not in place. Do you think Scope should be campaigning about this issue?
    I think that would be a great thing to campaign for, that and better access to "public" transport, the fact that in the 21st century a Judge thinks we dont have a right to a space on a bus needs to be addressed in my opinion, luckily I am a car driver so this does not affect me but it is shocking nevertheless, can you imagine the uproar if this attitude was taken to any other minority group? but because it is the disabled it seems to be widely accepted 
  • Garza
    Garza Member Posts: 149 Pioneering
    Garza said:
    I think things are improving for Disabled people, I do think both pieces of legislation are pretty toothless and can be widely ignored or bypassed by those who choose to, enforcement seems to be pretty thin on the ground 

    I would agree with parrot123 in that housing provision for disabled people especially in the social sector needs to be vastly improved
    Hi everyone - I'm Graham, I work for Scope, and I'm old enough to remember campaigning for a civil rights act back in the Nineties! Housing was a major gap when the DDA came into force, and campaigners and activists at the time were extremely unhappy that this essential element of independent living was missed out. Housing is still "exempt" from the Equality Act duties - bits of it like landlords not refusing adaptations are covered, but the fundamental right to accessible homes is still not in place. Do you think Scope should be campaigning about this issue?
    my personal situation regarding housing is that I am stuck in a too small 1 bed council flat, I dont have the means to buy, the council cannot or will not offer any alternativ and private renting is pretty much a no no for a wheelchair user on benefits I think 
  • davegregson40
    davegregson40 Member Posts: 81 Pioneering
    Yes, I too remember the Disability discrimination Act 1995, the Equality Act 2010 then combined a lot of previous legislation to bring it under that umbrella.  There is and are still some organizations that are not aware of employment rights or equality legislation and I believe we can strengthen the act. 
    Many will be aware that the act gets debated in Parliament on I think the 27th November where the adjustments for carers are discussed. I feel that there should also be protections for those who report workplace bullying and poor practices.
     
  • [Deleted User]
    [Deleted User] Posts: 1,651 Connected
    Also, 3 weeks ago I gave 30 days notice to Talk Talk in favour of going with local Fibre and Landline provider Plusnet, I spoke to Plusnet the week before last, and they can't even put an order in for my connection till around this time next week when the 30 days with Talk Talk's up

    So if I wasn't living with my Parents till further notice due  to the second lockdown, I'd have no landline or Internet for 2 full weeks till Plusnet goes live the week commencing the 23rd of November.

    How the chuff is that legal for a disabled adult who needs the support of Family and carers? I do have a mobile but the siginal in most parts of Sheffield is terrible.

  • [Deleted User]
    [Deleted User] Posts: 0 Pioneering
    Government actually realising there breaking thier own law when they stop benefits from genuine claimants for pip, esa, etc etc!
    The lady I saw from my local citizens advice said she's been campaigning for years on this subject as the government is breaking it's own law!!!!!
  • Parrot123
    Parrot123 Member Posts: 137 Pioneering
    Garza said:
    Garza said:
    I think things are improving for Disabled people, I do think both pieces of legislation are pretty toothless and can be widely ignored or bypassed by those who choose to, enforcement seems to be pretty thin on the ground 

    I would agree with parrot123 in that housing provision for disabled people especially in the social sector needs to be vastly improved
    Hi everyone - I'm Graham, I work for Scope, and I'm old enough to remember campaigning for a civil rights act back in the Nineties! Housing was a major gap when the DDA came into force, and campaigners and activists at the time were extremely unhappy that this essential element of independent living was missed out. Housing is still "exempt" from the Equality Act duties - bits of it like landlords not refusing adaptations are covered, but the fundamental right to accessible homes is still not in place. Do you think Scope should be campaigning about this issue?
    my personal situation regarding housing is that I am stuck in a too small 1 bed council flat, I dont have the means to buy, the council cannot or will not offer any alternativ and private renting is pretty much a no no for a wheelchair user on benefits I think 
    @garzq you can get a disicretionary housing payment from your council
  • Parrot123
    Parrot123 Member Posts: 137 Pioneering
    Garza said:
    I think things are improving for Disabled people, I do think both pieces of legislation are pretty toothless and can be widely ignored or bypassed by those who choose to, enforcement seems to be pretty thin on the ground 

    I would agree with parrot123 in that housing provision for disabled people especially in the social sector needs to be vastly improved
    Hi everyone - I'm Graham, I work for Scope, and I'm old enough to remember campaigning for a civil rights act back in the Nineties! Housing was a major gap when the DDA came into force, and campaigners and activists at the time were extremely unhappy that this essential element of independent living was missed out. Housing is still "exempt" from the Equality Act duties - bits of it like landlords not refusing adaptations are covered, but the fundamental right to accessible homes is still not in place. Do you think Scope should be campaigning about this issue?
    @[email protected] Yes we need to stand up and fight. I want a home of my own. ty Will
  • Parrot123
    Parrot123 Member Posts: 137 Pioneering
    Garza said:
    Garza said:
    I think things are improving for Disabled people, I do think both pieces of legislation are pretty toothless and can be widely ignored or bypassed by those who choose to, enforcement seems to be pretty thin on the ground 

    I would agree with parrot123 in that housing provision for disabled people especially in the social sector needs to be vastly improved
    Hi everyone - I'm Graham, I work for Scope, and I'm old enough to remember campaigning for a civil rights act back in the Nineties! Housing was a major gap when the DDA came into force, and campaigners and activists at the time were extremely unhappy that this essential element of independent living was missed out. Housing is still "exempt" from the Equality Act duties - bits of it like landlords not refusing adaptations are covered, but the fundamental right to accessible homes is still not in place. Do you think Scope should be campaigning about this issue?
    my personal situation regarding housing is that I am stuck in a too small 1 bed council flat, I dont have the means to buy, the council cannot or will not offer any alternativ and private renting is pretty much a no no for a wheelchair user on benefits I think 
    Garza said:
    Garza said:
    I think things are improving for Disabled people, I do think both pieces of legislation are pretty toothless and can be widely ignored or bypassed by those who choose to, enforcement seems to be pretty thin on the ground 

    I would agree with parrot123 in that housing provision for disabled people especially in the social sector needs to be vastly improved
    Hi everyone - I'm Graham, I work for Scope, and I'm old enough to remember campaigning for a civil rights act back in the Nineties! Housing was a major gap when the DDA came into force, and campaigners and activists at the time were extremely unhappy that this essential element of independent living was missed out. Housing is still "exempt" from the Equality Act duties - bits of it like landlords not refusing adaptations are covered, but the fundamental right to accessible homes is still not in place. Do you think Scope should be campaigning about this issue?
    my personal situation regarding housing is that I am stuck in a too small 1 bed council flat, I dont have the means to buy, the council cannot or will not offer any alternativ and private renting is pretty much a no no for a wheelchair user on benefits I think 
    @garza i am homeless and they do not care. where i live in Lanarkshire. How am i supposed to keep moving in lockdown its impossible im so angry. I was illegally evicted as my landlord let my home fall below repairable standards. I am taking him to the first tier tribunal. How can a cancer chronic kidney disease, and chronic asthma move every 3 days. I feel like they are playing games with my life. I cannot apply for a up and downstairs house not allowed???????. I am in a 4 in the block upstairs with my Nephew. But had 1 offer a 1 bedroom. WE NEED TO FIGHT FOR HOUSES FOR US AND OUR CARERS PLEASE>
    '
  • Parrot123
    Parrot123 Member Posts: 137 Pioneering
    Garza said:
    Garza said:
    I think things are improving for Disabled people, I do think both pieces of legislation are pretty toothless and can be widely ignored or bypassed by those who choose to, enforcement seems to be pretty thin on the ground 

    I would agree with parrot123 in that housing provision for disabled people especially in the social sector needs to be vastly improved
    Hi everyone - I'm Graham, I work for Scope, and I'm old enough to remember campaigning for a civil rights act back in the Nineties! Housing was a major gap when the DDA came into force, and campaigners and activists at the time were extremely unhappy that this essential element of independent living was missed out. Housing is still "exempt" from the Equality Act duties - bits of it like landlords not refusing adaptations are covered, but the fundamental right to accessible homes is still not in place. Do you think Scope should be campaigning about this issue?
    my personal situation regarding housing is that I am stuck in a too small 1 bed council flat, I dont have the means to buy, the council cannot or will not offer any alternativ and private renting is pretty much a no no for a wheelchair user on benefits I think 
    @garza you can get help with moving. Discrecitionally housing payment. You apply away. Try make them listen. If that fails get mp and shelter involved. Will
  • kelly45
    kelly45 Member Posts: 13 Connected
    I have just had to leave a job I love due to arthritis in my back which is a progressive and painful condition, and my work have said they can't offer me anything less physical, I am also unable to claim pip despite appealing with evidence too.
    I've been looking at disabilities and working and as we understand the needs of one another, maybe we could build businesses run by disabled people.
    It would be interesting to hear others thoughts and opinions about this idea?
    And the pros and cons pleases 

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