Read @Richard_Scope's article in the Metro about disabled childrens' access to sport — Scope | Disability forum
If we become concerned about you or anyone else while using one of our services, we will act in line with our safeguarding policy and procedures. This may involve sharing this information with relevant authorities to ensure we comply with our policies and legal obligations.

Find out how to let us know if you're concerned about another member's safety.

Read @Richard_Scope's article in the Metro about disabled childrens' access to sport

Cher_Inactive
Cher_Inactive Posts: 4,400 Scope online community team

You can read our very own @Richard_Scope in this week's Metro talking about the barriers disabled children face in accessing sport and the problems posed by non-participation.


Two photos of Richard sat in his wheelchair one in an urban backdrop and the other whilst at the gym

Speaking about his own experience of growing up with Cerebral Palsy and how valuable being included in games lessons was, Richard reflects that to have been left out would have made him feel:
'different’ and it probably would have affected the other pupils’ relationships with me and how they treated me too.

The benefits of sport to disabled children - and those of all ages - are without question and extend beyond the physical to boosting emotional wellbeing, meeting others and increasing confidence.  

However, research conducted by Scope found that since the start of the pandemic:

Almost half (48%) of [those surveyed] have become less active... with many facing barriers to exercise due to shielding or fears about the risk of catching Covid-19. And... 42% said their mental health ha[d] worsened as a result of being less active, and 51% said that their mobility, dexterity or movement ha[d] taken a dip.

Richard goes on to unpack the reasons behind disabled young people's exclusion from sport, identifying a lack of understanding by teachers, inaccessible gyms, expensive equipment and "a culture of caution now – with so much red tape around everything" as just some of the factors restricting equal access to sport for those with impairments.

Want to have a read for yourself?  Then check out "Disabled kids don't deserve to be left out of school sports lessons' on the Metro website.

Over to you:

  • Were you left out of P.E. lessons at school? Or, did your school adapt lessons and ensure you were included?
  • How did this make you feel?
  • Do you still find barriers to joining in sport you'd like to take up?

Let us know your thoughts in the comments section below. 

Online Community Co-ordinator

Want to tell us about your experience on the online community?  Talk to our chatbot and let us know.

Concerned about another member's safety or wellbeing? Flag your concerns with us.
Tagged:

Comments

  • Ross_Scope
    Ross_Scope Posts: 7,520 Scope online community team
    A super read, well done @Richard_Scope :) 
    Online Community Coordinator

    Concerned about another member's safety or wellbeing? Flag your concerns with us.

    Did you receive a helpful reply to your discussion? Fill out our feedback form and let us know about it.
  • WestHam06
    WestHam06 Member, Scope Volunteer Posts: 1,396 Pioneering
    Great article @Richard_Scope, thank you for sharing this. 
  • Sandy_123
    Sandy_123 Member Posts: 4,852 Disability Gamechanger
    Very good article @Richard_Scope, I hope it inspires others to try get active. ( myself included) 
  • Globster
    Globster Member, Community Co-Production Group, CP Network Posts: 1,380 Pioneering
    edited July 2021
    @Richard_Scope
    It was a fantastic article Richard well done
  • LukeChester
    LukeChester Member Posts: 9 Listener
    Great article. In the XXI century, equal access to sport for everyone should be normality, not a dream.
    I'm always glad to hear stories about people who break through any obstacles and restrictions to show that nothing is impossible. For example, I was impressed by facts of women’s participation in sport throughout history and their struggle for sports equality. 
    Fortunately, more and more people speak about it, and it opens more possibilities to everyone.
  • Ross_Scope
    Ross_Scope Posts: 7,520 Scope online community team
    Glad you enjoyed the article @LukeChester :) 
    Online Community Coordinator

    Concerned about another member's safety or wellbeing? Flag your concerns with us.

    Did you receive a helpful reply to your discussion? Fill out our feedback form and let us know about it.
  • WestHam06
    WestHam06 Member, Scope Volunteer Posts: 1,396 Pioneering
    I agree, we need to continue to speak about the possibilities in relation to sport and how everyone, regardless of who they are, should be able to join in if they wish to. I help to coach a football team for people with Cerebral Palsy. The most important thing is that everyone is included and everyone has fun and we certainly do that :) Thank you.
  • TatiP
    TatiP Member Posts: 2 Listener
    I agree with @Richard_Scope that children should be included in PE lessons, however, it's not always that straight forward depending on your disability. In my case for instance, I was the most sporty child you could think of, I used to have a shot at nearly everything before I discovered my "hidden disability", I even managed to start marathon training at the age of 14... however about 12 months later, my knees swell up so much, I could hardly walk, or go up any steps, and at one point I couldn't bend my leg at all or even reach my foot to put my own socks on. The most painful part wasn't physical, but as you say, it was the fact that I could no longer be active and do what I loved, however, there was another element of trauma and fear that soon settled even when my illness started getting proper treatment and when I had managed to resume walking normally, going up steps or putting my own socks on. There was a constant fear that maybe I could go back to that horror movie again by taking one wrong step or pushing myself a little bit, so it's true, I wasn't included in the PE lessons for many years after that, but it was my own choice to do so, not so that the school or that my parents didn't want me to. I was already a teenager and capable of making my own decisions, but I chose to be left out not because my friends or my teachers didn't want me taking part, but only because I was very afraid of my own body and what it could do to me if I tried again. It wasn't fun being left out, but I occasionally had the company of someone who wasn't feeling their best either, and I also had extra time to focus on whatever I wanted, may that have been my studies or just listening to music. I did try once playing football with my classmates, and while I was out of shape, they were all so impressed that I had tried, and did ok playing. I didn't repeat my feat though as I was afraid of the physical repercussions. On the other hand, I did practice sport on my own outside of school, I was lucky to have a sports club membership which allowed me to go swimming sometimes twice a week, and while that is not as fun and exciting as teams' sports are, I felt safer about keeping fit that way, rather than trying to push my body to the brink again. I think everyone's story is a bit different and it would be nice if schools can be a bit more adaptable or creative to include the disabled children better, but I don't necessarily blame them for not doing much to include me at the time since I was so extremely reluctant to do so, maybe the support I really needed was more on the psychological side rather than the physical side.

Brightness

Complete our feedback form and tell us how we can make the community better.