Help please. My daughter is a little behind developmentally, and briefly had SLT. What do you think? — Scope | Disability forum
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Help please. My daughter is a little behind developmentally, and briefly had SLT. What do you think?

butterflyfly
butterflyfly Member Posts: 2 Listener
edited October 2021 in Autism and neurodiversity
Hi I was wondering on some advice please. My daughter is 8, (9 in February) when she was 3 she went briefly to speech and language, she is very small and the dentist also said she is a few months/ a year behind developmentally. 

She has trouble reading (although this has got much better) and writing (although again this has got much better) but she still always forgets punctuation, capital letters, full stops and she can’t spell. 

She finds it hard to understand the conversation and always needs support to understand what people mean. I think she knows what things and words are but will still ask me, “what do they mean”.

She is very quiet in school. Very good and very very polite. She scored working towards in maths, English and science, but scored working at for RE and PE. 

She finds it hard to follow instructions, either forgetting some or getting distracted on the way. 

She is super cute. She gets angry with her father, and can hit him (not hard). She can get angry at one of her sisters but she doesn’t hurt her. She never hits me and is always very sad and apologetic if she thinks she has upset me. In fact she apologises over and over again until I have to ask her to stop with the apologies as I’m ok. 

She always interrupts despite being taught to wait from an early age. She finds it hard to wait. I always have to go over plans or explain our day. She is impatient and likes to do things when she wants to but she is generally very good when I explain why things can’t be done at that time and she doesn’t tantrum, although she may sulk (I know this is usual for kids). 

She cannot swim. She can tell the basic time although she still gets the small and big hand mixed up. She’s better at math but she gets her symbols + -  etc mixed up. She’s only recently (in the last year) started getting better at math, in year 2 she couldn’t + or - 1 more or less. 

She talks constantly. I say she talks before her eyes open ha ha and she remembers the last thing she said at night and talks about it that morning, as if that’s all she’s been thinking about. 

She will talk to strangers and be very polite asking them about their day and how they are. 

I was just wondering what people thought? 
Thank you for your time ☺️

Comments

  • Ross_Scope
    Ross_Scope Posts: 7,398 Scope online community team
    Hello @butterflyfly


    Welcome to the community, good to see you join and thank you for telling us a bit about your daughter. 

    As you suggest, some of those things do appear quite normal for a child of her age, but if any of it is concerning you have you spoken to her doctor about the situation? And is she receiving any support in school?
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  • butterflyfly
    butterflyfly Member Posts: 2 Listener
    hi thank you for your reply. no I’ve not spoken to a doctor. 
    She doesn’t receive any specialist support in school but the TA does sit on her table. Her year 2 teacher said to me that she has slow processing but nothing more was done about it. Her year 3 teacher said that she was doing very well. But then they don’t see how she is at home. 

    She just seems so developmentally slower than her peers. It’s noticeable when they are together. 
  • Ross_Scope
    Ross_Scope Posts: 7,398 Scope online community team
    Hi there @butterflyfly

    Thanks for your reply, if you are concerned by her behaviour at home then it might be worth speaking with her doctor to see if they can advise in any way. From that, you might be able to get her some additional support in school if that's what you think she needs - although it's good to hear that the teachers think she is doing well.

    Furthermore, Scope have a Parents Connect service which you may want to read more about, it provides an opportunity for parents to gain peer support.
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  • dolfrog
    dolfrog Member Posts: 441 Pioneering
    Hi @ butterflyfly 

    From what you have described your daughter may have Auditory Processing Disorder, the listening disability, or the brain having problems processing what the ears hear. 
    The temporal type of Auditory Processing Disorder is about the brain having problems processing the gaps between sounds which can include the gaps between words in rapid speech. This is also the main underlying cognitive cause of the dyslexia symptom.

    You could have a  look at "My Evernote Auditory Processing Disorder Web Pages & Some Graphics." web page which explains the different types of Auditory Processing Disorder, and includes links to related international research paper collections. 
    https://www.evernote.com/shard/s329/sh/8e74e182-f110-4c41-931e-64fb5c1ed3ab/0a70222f704d78d7d92274b318fa9ded 

    I was the first adult in the UK to be clinically diagnosed as having Auditory Processing Disorder (APD) back in 2003, to help the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) gain UK government funding for a 5 year research program so that I could set up a support organisation  to help those diagnosed as having APD. The MRC got their funding in 2004.     
     . 
  • Dempseym
    Dempseym Member Posts: 19 Connected
    Has she had a psychological evaluation?  She sounds adorable and just needs support in the areas she has difficulty with. A diagnosis would help target her weaknesses and allow her to develop these areas with specialist support.  My son is phonologically dyslexic with mild learning difficulties.  He said most of the time he doesn't try because he is embarrassed about his disability.  He is an adult and still cannot read or write although, he has progressed so much once he was thrown in the deep end so to speak, and had to use the abilities he did not realize he had!  He is now living independently with support and has achieved so much by being told by me, you can do it, you just think you cannot.  I am so proud of him.  I do hope your daughter receives a proper assessment so that you will know the areas that require that little more focus and attention to make her grow more confident albeit she sounds so confident and sweet. 

Brightness

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