Anyone with Dyspraxia/Have any Knowledge? — Scope | Disability forum
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Anyone with Dyspraxia/Have any Knowledge?

oldngrumpy
oldngrumpy Scope Member Posts: 212 Pioneering

Can a Disability Lead To Dyspraxia?

Folks Before you read this, I don't know much about Dyspraxia. I was told once that there are variants of it.
Also if anyone reading this with Dyspraxia could we please communicate, I have several questions.

I have been told I am clumsy.
This being falling over at any time not through obstacles, just balance.
I was at a college doing an assesment. Maths and English.
Later that afternoon I collected my results. It was then the teacher told me I may Dyspraxic/have. Dyspraxia. I denied this but read on it. It is a minefield.


I'm not going into detail anymore for fear of boring the question. Thanking you.

.


Comments

  • L_Volunteer
    L_Volunteer Community Volunteer Adviser, Scope Member Posts: 7,979 Disability Gamechanger
    Hi @oldngrumpy

    Thanks for your question. Dyspraxia is also commonly referred to as developmental coordination disorder. The NHS indicates that a disability could lead to dyspraxia. In full, the NHS states "Doing co-ordinated movements is a complex process that involves many different nerves and parts of the brain. Any problem in this process could potentially lead to difficulties with movement and co-ordination. It's not usually clear why co-ordination doesn't develop as well as other abilities in children with DCD. However, a number of risk factors that can increase a child's likelihood of developing DCD have been identified. These include: being born prematurely, before the 37th week of pregnancy, being born with a low birth weight, having a family history of DCD, although it is not clear exactly which genes may be involved in the condition, the mother drinking alcohol or taking illegal drugs while pregnant"  (https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/developmental-coordination-disorder-dyspraxia/). Though, the reasons for developing dyspraxia in adulthood are currently unknown by both the NHS (https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/developmental-coordination-disorder-dyspraxia-in-adults/) and the Dyspraxia Foundation (https://dyspraxiafoundation.org.uk/questions/dyspraxia/). If you have any follow-up questions about dyspraxia, please do not hesitate to ask us and hopefully, we can support you in finding answers  :)
    Community Volunteer Adviser with professional knowledge of education, special educational needs and disabilities and EHCP's. Pronouns: She/her. 

    Please note: if I use the online community outside of its hours of administration, I am doing so in a personal capacity only.
  • oldngrumpy
    oldngrumpy Scope Member Posts: 212 Pioneering
    L_Volunteer
    Could I please contact you privately. If so. My question will be in a few days?
    I am making it out at the moment
  • oldngrumpy
    oldngrumpy Scope Member Posts: 212 Pioneering
  • chiarieds
    chiarieds Community member Posts: 15,458 Disability Gamechanger
    Hi @oldngrumpy - you can send a Private Message to another by clicking on 'My profile,' then on 'View profile.' Then click on the 2nd icon from the left under you user name. Click then on 'New message' at the top, which opens up a box on the left of your screen. Type in the person's name without the @ symbol, e.g. whom I think you want to contact L_Volunteer, type your message then post you reply.
  • L_Volunteer
    L_Volunteer Community Volunteer Adviser, Scope Member Posts: 7,979 Disability Gamechanger
    Hi @oldngrumpy

    We encourage people to communicate with us on these discussion posts and to only private message us if necessary. Are you able to ask your question here? It is ok to say no if you feel a private message would be necessary :)
    Community Volunteer Adviser with professional knowledge of education, special educational needs and disabilities and EHCP's. Pronouns: She/her. 

    Please note: if I use the online community outside of its hours of administration, I am doing so in a personal capacity only.
  • BrokenDoll
    BrokenDoll Community member Posts: 4 Listener
    Hi, Im Dyspraxic, in answer to your first question

    'Can a Disability Lead To Dyspraxia?'

    No, you can not aquire dyspraxia through life/disability it is a developmental condition that happens due to underdevelopment of the connections in the brain as a fetus and is defined as a defect present from birth and is perminants.

    If you do have it from birth but are not diagnosed (possible, a lot of people where not diagnosed as it wasnt well known) then unfortunately the NHS does not really help adults only children so it is pretty hard to get taken serious (I have the full diagnosis and cant get any help anymore as I'm over 18).

    It is however 'similar-ish' to Cerebal Palsy or 'Apraxia' but these can occure at any age due to later issues like trauma, oxygen deprivation and stroke, Apraxia can in some cases improve with time.

    It has other off shoot that are common symptoms but can stand alone as indervidual diagnosises without Dyspraxia things like Dyslexia (reading/writing), Dyscalclia (math and numbers) and Dysphasia (speach issues) that are more common or can have other causes.


  • Wibbles
    Wibbles Community member Posts: 1,460 Pioneering
    edited December 2022
    Hi, Im Dyspraxic, in answer to your first question

    'Can a Disability Lead To Dyspraxia?'

    No, you can not aquire dyspraxia through life/disability it is a developmental condition that happens due to underdevelopment of the connections in the brain as a fetus and is defined as a defect present from birth and is perminants.

    If you do have it from birth but are not diagnosed (possible, a lot of people where not diagnosed as it wasnt well known) then unfortunately the NHS does not really help adults only children so it is pretty hard to get taken serious (I have the full diagnosis and cant get any help anymore as I'm over 18).

    It is however 'similar-ish' to Cerebal Palsy or 'Apraxia' but these can occure at any age due to later issues like trauma, oxygen deprivation and stroke, Apraxia can in some cases improve with time.

    It has other off shoot that are common symptoms but can stand alone as indervidual diagnosises without Dyspraxia things like Dyslexia (reading/writing), Dyscalclia (math and numbers) and Dysphasia (speach issues) that are more common or can have other causes.



    I beg to differ about your comments that "You cannot acquire Dyspraxia through life/disability"
    I became Dyspraxic, over 30 years ago - due to a head injury
    I was diagnosed by National Hospital in London as having Acquired Dyspraxia
    It affected my whole life - to begin with - I lost the ability to walk, speak, write and even think straight - Over the years - I have regained some of my loses - but still am unable to write or speak clearly - I was also initially diagnosed with Parkinsomism !
  • L_Volunteer
    L_Volunteer Community Volunteer Adviser, Scope Member Posts: 7,979 Disability Gamechanger
    edited December 2022
    Hi @BrokenDoll. Thanks for responding to this thread with your insight and understanding. I mainly want to respond to you to greet you.

    However, can I please inform you that you have posted on a thread that is a year old now. That means you might, unfortunately, be unlikely to receive a response.

    Additionally, we encourage you to back up your information wherever possible with evidence. This is to make sure the information you provide is factually accurate wherever possible.

    The NHS says the following about acquired dyspraxia:

    Acquired dyspraxia of speech can affect a person at any age, although it most typically occurs in adults. It is caused by damage to the parts of the brain that are involved in speaking, and involves the loss or impairment of existing speech abilities. The disorder may result from a stroke, head injury, tumour, or other illness affecting the brain.

    Acquired dyspraxia of speech may occur on its own or together with other difficulties, e.g. muscle weakness affecting speech production (this is known as dysarthia) or language difficulties (this is known as dysphasia). 

    This means that some things that might be disabling may also lead to acquired dyspraxia. Though, the form of dyspraxia most people are aware of is the type of dyspraxia you have described and provided information about. 

    Additionally, the NHS lists some resources that might be helpful for adults with dyspraxia. These include things such as:

    • Occupational therapy
    • Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT)
    • Access to Work
    • Dyspraxia Foundation
    • Dyspraxic Adults
    • Movement Matters UK
    I hope this at least semi-helps, especially with supporting you to settle into using Scope's forum  :)
    Community Volunteer Adviser with professional knowledge of education, special educational needs and disabilities and EHCP's. Pronouns: She/her. 

    Please note: if I use the online community outside of its hours of administration, I am doing so in a personal capacity only.

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