My experience with the PIP telephone assessment. — Scope | Disability forum
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My experience with the PIP telephone assessment.

Tharos
Tharos Member Posts: 11 Connected
Hi all, 

I thought I'd share a few words on my experience with a PIP telephone assessment. It definitely helped me to read others prior to my own so I thought I would do the same. 

It's worth pointing out though that of course the assessment was based on information provided about specific conditions I manage so things will vary somewhat  from person to person. 

My assessment lasted about an hour. The HCP that conducted the assessment seemed nice enough. She introduced herself, her role and very clearly explained how the assessment would go. She gave me the chance to ask questions and made sure I was clear on everything before she began. 

To her credit, she appeared attentive, she allowed me plenty of time to answer the questions and would clarify my answers (or repeat them back to me) before taking note of what I had said, which I appreciated  It felt like she was listening which was good. Obviously I don't yet know how much of that will have translated into her written report, but that was the impression she gave. 

Personally I found the use of notes VERY helpful. She began the assessment with what she described as a "social history" and involved questions on my living arrangements, adaptations, pets, work, social life etc. Although they were relatively basic questions, I was glad I had thought to anticipate these types of questions and make notes/consider my answers beforehand. It gave me the opportunity to be concise and clear in my responses and make sure I didn't miss anything important out. 

The main body of the assessment was working through the descriptors as expected. Again, having a copy of the answers I provided on the review form was extremely helpful. As many others have said, I highly recommend you do this. I would say the questions, though similar were far more in depth than is articulated on the form. She would ask me for step-by-step processes of how I used certain aides, "specifically" why I used them (I did my best to continue to link back to specific symptoms of my condition at those points) and also consequences on what would happen if I didn't or how I felt afterwards. She would also occassionally prompt for real life examples (though not always) so I tried to link in a few even when she didn't request them. 

Questions that I found particularly difficult were mostly related to specific timings. When did this example happen? How many times a week does X happen (even if it's only intermittent and therefore not regular). I'll admit I found those quite irritating because outside of these assessments it's not something I would  ever need to  keep track of. It's part of daily life that I cope with as and when is necessary, but I don't make an effortt to remember the day or time of that time I injured myself trying to perform a task several months or years ago. I would be surprised if many did??  I gave my best estimate, but they were educated guesses.

My overall feeling was that I did my best with the assessment, which is all I could hope for I suppose. It lasted about an hour. I came away tired and a somewhat stressed, but I felt I'd answered the questions to the best of my ability and remembered to stress the particularly important points. There were no questions that I really felt I couldn't answer or didn't answer well enough, so I'm trying to positive. I guess all that remains is to wait for the decision now. 

Comments

  • woodbine
    woodbine Community Co-Production Group Posts: 5,323 Disability Gamechanger
    Thank you for sharing, the only thing i have to add is that it can be a good idea to keep a diary for a couple of weeks before the assessment.
    I am a person with epilepsy not an epileptic, my illness doesn't define me.
  • CaroD
    CaroD Member Posts: 1 Listener
    How helpful and kind of you to share your experiences. It is so very difficult to have to justify your "limitations" to a stranger.  Limitations which are very often tackled with supreme ingenuity, effort and persistence.  I hope you all realise how some of those who share similar experiences are in awe of how tenacious you can be and what lengths are needed to get through the day and what strategies have to be planned for the next.

  • wamda
    wamda Member Posts: 7 Listener
    Tharos said:
    Hi all, 

    I thought I'd share a few words on my experience with a PIP telephone assessment. It definitely helped me to read others prior to my own so I thought I would do the same. 

    It's worth pointing out though that of course the assessment was based on information provided about specific conditions I manage so things will vary somewhat  from person to person. 

    My assessment lasted about an hour. The HCP that conducted the assessment seemed nice enough. She introduced herself, her role and very clearly explained how the assessment would go. She gave me the chance to ask questions and made sure I was clear on everything before she began. 

    To her credit, she appeared attentive, she allowed me plenty of time to answer the questions and would clarify my answers (or repeat them back to me) before taking note of what I had said, which I appreciated  It felt like she was listening which was good. Obviously I don't yet know how much of that will have translated into her written report, but that was the impression she gave. 

    Personally I found the use of notes VERY helpful. She began the assessment with what she described as a "social history" and involved questions on my living arrangements, adaptations, pets, work, social life etc. Although they were relatively basic questions, I was glad I had thought to anticipate these types of questions and make notes/consider my answers beforehand. It gave me the opportunity to be concise and clear in my responses and make sure I didn't miss anything important out. 

    The main body of the assessment was working through the descriptors as expected. Again, having a copy of the answers I provided on the review form was extremely helpful. As many others have said, I highly recommend you do this. I would say the questions, though similar were far more in depth than is articulated on the form. She would ask me for step-by-step processes of how I used certain aides, "specifically" why I used them (I did my best to continue to link back to specific symptoms of my condition at those points) and also consequences on what would happen if I didn't or how I felt afterwards. She would also occassionally prompt for real life examples (though not always) so I tried to link in a few even when she didn't request them. 

    Questions that I found particularly difficult were mostly related to specific timings. When did this example happen? How many times a week does X happen (even if it's only intermittent and therefore not regular). I'll admit I found those quite irritating because outside of these assessments it's not something I would  ever need to  keep track of. It's part of daily life that I cope with as and when is necessary, but I don't make an effortt to remember the day or time of that time I injured myself trying to perform a task several months or years ago. I would be surprised if many did??  I gave my best estimate, but they were educated guesses.

    My overall feeling was that I did my best with the assessment, which is all I could hope for I suppose. It lasted about an hour. I came away tired and a somewhat stressed, but I felt I'd answered the questions to the best of my ability and remembered to stress the particularly important points. There were no questions that I really felt I couldn't answer or didn't answer well enough, so I'm trying to positive. I guess all that remains is to wait for the decision now. 
    sounds like you did a good job . good luck. i have my assessment in a few weeks and i am somewhat anxious about it. your post was inciteful, thankyou.
  • Tharos
    Tharos Member Posts: 11 Connected
    wamda said:
    sounds like you did a good job . good luck. i have my assessment in a few weeks and i am somewhat anxious about it. your post was inciteful, thankyou.
     I'm glad it was useful. Best of luck! I was very nervous about mine as well, in all honesty it was not as bad as I was expecting. I hope you'll find the same. 

    Best advice I can give is to take as long as you need to answer the questions in as much detail as you can. Don't rush to answer and if you need more detail or clarification of the questions be sure to ask. 

    Try and include a few real life examples of how your condition impacts you. What happens if you try to do a certain task? And definitely try to have an idea of when these examples happened if you can (I was asked that quite a bit) 

    If you have issues with limited mobility try and get an idea of how far you can move (aided or unaided if at all) E.g for me I was asked how far is it from my front door to my car and how far from my car to my desk at work. What conditions is it safe for you to walk in, and can you do it repeatedly and in a timely manor compared to someone else?  (This might not be relevant to your condition so ignore if not, but I thought I would mention it just in case!) 

    Good luck, hope it goes well! 

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