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disabled access at concerts

happyfella
happyfella Member Posts: 192 Pioneering
edited October 26 in Coffee lounge
Hi, i would love to go to concerts again, but the trouble is i cannot stand for very long. i do not have a blue badge but receive full pip, but not the right points for a blue badge.

My daughter would love to go concerts with me again and most of the concerts are standing only. I am just wondering what you need to purchase tickets for the disabled access section of concerts that only have standing room only and some seats for disabled.

The reason why i will not apply for the blue badge is due to a bad experience with PIP, and also the horror stories I hear when you go for the assessment for a blue badge.

I was talking to a friend the other week who struggles to walk and he was turned down three times because he got his blue badge. He said the experience was really horrible, and mentally i could not cope with such an experience
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Comments

  • Tori_Scope
    Tori_Scope Posts: 6,575

    Scope community team

    Hi @happyfella :) 

    I'm going to tag @Ross_Scope in here as I know he's a keen concert-goer, so he might have some advice for you.

    I had a look on Ticketmaster's website, and found this page on how to book tickets that meet your access needs. This includes information on how to find the tickets, and what proof may be needed. If you're unsure, I'd advise you contact the venue and ask what's available. 

    I'm sorry to hear that your friend had a bad experience with getting a blue badge. It's important to remember that not everyone's experience will be the same, but I can understand if you don't feel ready to take on that process at the moment.
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  • mikehughescq
    mikehughescq Member Posts: 7,780 Disability Gamechanger
    Identify your venue and go to their web site rather than the route for booking tickets. You will usually find some basic accessibility information but often you'll find a really good access guide and maybe even an access register where your needs can be kept permanently and referred to as needed. 

    Really good example of this right now. I have used the access area at the side of the stage at my local venue for a few years. I can stand but prefer to sit for health and line of sight reasons. I went to book for a 2022 gig and the only tickets left were standing. They were cheaper than sitting. I emailed the venue via their accessibility route; they checked the register and agreed myself and my family could transfer from the standing areas to the access area at no extra cost. The view isn't perfect and the sound is awful even though it's a beautiful venue but generally speaking things are getting better. 

    If you go the access route first before the ticket site you will sometimes find tickets reserved for people with accessibility needs which are not on general sale. You will also find it's always worth talking to the venue. I have been to many gigs which were categorically sold out until I started to explain my issues. Has often resulted in front row or clear view seats. 

    This all varies from venue to venue so your friends experience may simply reflect a poor venue or a poor understanding of the process. 

    I hope this helps. 
  • happyfella
    happyfella Member Posts: 192 Pioneering
    Hi @happyfella :) 

    I'm going to tag @Ross_Scope in here as I know he's a keen concert-goer, so he might have some advice for you.

    I had a look on Ticketmaster's website, and found this page on how to book tickets that meet your access needs. This includes information on how to find the tickets, and what proof may be needed. If you're unsure, I'd advise you contact the venue and ask what's available. 

    I'm sorry to hear that your friend had a bad experience with getting a blue badge. It's important to remember that not everyone's experience will be the same, but I can understand if you don't feel ready to take on that process at the moment.

    thank you
  • happyfella
    happyfella Member Posts: 192 Pioneering
    Identify your venue and go to their web site rather than the route for booking tickets. You will usually find some basic accessibility information but often you'll find a really good access guide and maybe even an access register where your needs can be kept permanently and referred to as needed. 

    Really good example of this right now. I have used the access area at the side of the stage at my local venue for a few years. I can stand but prefer to sit for health and line of sight reasons. I went to book for a 2022 gig and the only tickets left were standing. They were cheaper than sitting. I emailed the venue via their accessibility route; they checked the register and agreed myself and my family could transfer from the standing areas to the access area at no extra cost. The view isn't perfect and the sound is awful even though it's a beautiful venue but generally speaking things are getting better. 

    If you go the access route first before the ticket site you will sometimes find tickets reserved for people with accessibility needs which are not on general sale. You will also find it's always worth talking to the venue. I have been to many gigs which were categorically sold out until I started to explain my issues. Has often resulted in front row or clear view seats. 

    This all varies from venue to venue so your friends experience may simply reflect a poor venue or a poor understanding of the process. 

    I hope this helps. 

    Thank you, it does help
  • happyfella
    happyfella Member Posts: 192 Pioneering
    i am really confused with ticketmaster. it gives you choices and sorry but this confuses me. I come under Ambulant Disabled, and apparently i can also take Essential Companion as i need someone with me at all times. I do not have a wheel chair. I am supposed to have a walking stick but too proud to use it. So, i am just trying to understand, if i wanted to book with ticketmaster, how do i find tickets. i see they have the disabled sign, but i think that is for wheel chair users. this is really confusing
  • mikehughescq
    mikehughescq Member Posts: 7,780 Disability Gamechanger
    Don’t start with Ticketmaster. Start with the venue. Ticketmaster will send you round in circles forever. 
  • happyfella
    happyfella Member Posts: 192 Pioneering
    I have booked two tickets with ticketmaster to go to a concert but i am worried. I have bought the ambulant disabled tickets. What I worried about is will i be looked at different. i know this is stupid but i have confidence issues. also, when i am in pain i have serious trouble walking, but when the pain is not as bad then my walking looks normal. Will people look at me who are sitting in the same type of tickets look at me and think why is he using those type of tickets when his walking is not too bad.
  • Ross_Scope
    Ross_Scope Posts: 5,377

    Scope community team

    In my experience @happyfella, other concert goers and venue staff are a pleasure to deal with most of the time. Of course you get the odd exception, but I think you'll find people to be very respectful and considerate of access customers. 

    What concert are you going to see?
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  • happyfella
    happyfella Member Posts: 192 Pioneering
    it is westlife. Since my accident my confidence is very low. i am always worried about what people think of me. some days i can walk normally, but if my pain kicks in then i struggle to walk. so what i am saying if i am not to bad on the day of the concert, i am worried people will look at me and think why is he sat in these seats when he looks ok
  • Circe
    Circe Member Posts: 49 Courageous
    Hi, i would love to go to concerts again, but the trouble is i cannot stand for very long. i do not have a blue badge but receive full pip, but not the right points for a blue badge.

    My daughter would love to go concerts with me again and most of the concerts are standing only. I am just wondering what you need to purchase tickets for the disabled access section of concerts that only have standing room only and some seats for disabled.

    The reason why i will not apply for the blue badge is due to a bad experience with PIP, and also the horror stories I hear when you go for the assessment for a blue badge.

    I was talking to a friend the other week who struggles to walk and he was turned down three times because he got his blue badge. He said the experience was really horrible, and mentally i could not cope with such an experience
    Fortunately, I haven't had any difficulties with the blue badge application, I am however getting hassle trying to renew my bus pass.
    Like you, pre -covid; I had resigned myself to not not go to any live event for the same reasons- can't stand long periods and if seating was available it was usually very uncomfortable seating or too small for me to actually see a band  [people standing in front of me and blocking my view] so I just stopped going to events. Then covid plague happened and to be honest I am keeping away from busy places too so I can't see that changing any time soon. Now i have wheels things hopefully be different as it rules out having to rely on pot luck regarding seating options. Probably get accessibility issues instead lol.
  • mikehughescq
    mikehughescq Member Posts: 7,780 Disability Gamechanger
    In my experience @happyfella, other concert goers and venue staff are a pleasure to deal with most of the time. Of course you get the odd exception, but I think you'll find people to be very respectful and considerate of access customers. 

    What concert are you going to see?
    I can only echo this. Make yourself known to the staff via accessibility forms and registration and it can often be a joy. 
  • scorcher
    scorcher Member Posts: 4 Listener
    I have booked two tickets with ticketmaster to go to a concert but i am worried. I have bought the ambulant disabled tickets. What I worried about is will i be looked at different. i know this is stupid but i have confidence issues. also, when i am in pain i have serious trouble walking, but when the pain is not as bad then my walking looks normal. Will people look at me who are sitting in the same type of tickets look at me and think why is he using those type of tickets when his walking is not too bad.
    Disabilities are often invisible so no one will look at you and judge you at all. I go to concerts and the theatre. I'm not a wheelchair user and have no walking aids. No one has ever commented to me and if they think anything, I can't hear them so it doesn't matter. When I leave the concert, I struggle to walk after being sat a long time. That's when it becomes visible. I've never had any issues.
  • happyfella
    happyfella Member Posts: 192 Pioneering
    scorcher said:
    I have booked two tickets with ticketmaster to go to a concert but i am worried. I have bought the ambulant disabled tickets. What I worried about is will i be looked at different. i know this is stupid but i have confidence issues. also, when i am in pain i have serious trouble walking, but when the pain is not as bad then my walking looks normal. Will people look at me who are sitting in the same type of tickets look at me and think why is he using those type of tickets when his walking is not too bad.
    Disabilities are often invisible so no one will look at you and judge you at all. I go to concerts and the theatre. I'm not a wheelchair user and have no walking aids. No one has ever commented to me and if they think anything, I can't hear them so it doesn't matter. When I leave the concert, I struggle to walk after being sat a long time. That's when it becomes visible. I've never had any issues.

    Thank you. I keep getting told not to worry about what other people think but i do.

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