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I think parents of children who have send have no idea what actually happens in schools

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redapple
redapple Community member Posts: 1 Listener
edited November 2021 in Education and skills
I understand exactly how you feel. I think parents of children who have send have no idea what actually happens in schools. That only ONE person in a WHOLE school has to have ANY qualifications in additional needs(and even then it only applies to SENCos that started after 2008). In fact they only have to get some training three years after they started the job( 2015 Code of Practice). That the Carter Review in 2015 found that there was virtually no training in supporting children with special educational needs on new teacher training courses. Also in independent and special schools ANYONE can be the SENCo and that they never need to get any training at all.
www.specialeducationalneeds.co.uk/uploads/1/1/4/6/11463509/senco_-_key_information_guide__3.pdf
I would recommend that any parent, before allowing their child to join a new school, should check does the SENCo have the NASEN level 7 award or a masters degree in specifically special educational needs for young people or something similar. 
Please, please check that the people looking after your child who might need specialist, trained support is qualified to do so.

Comments

  • Ross_Alumni
    Ross_Alumni Scope alumni Posts: 7,649 Championing
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    Hello @redapple and welcome to the community, thank you for raising such an important subject and providing your perspective. I hope that other parents find your post helpful.

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  • L_Volunteer
    L_Volunteer Community Volunteer Adviser, Scope Member Posts: 7,980 Championing
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    Hi @redapple

    Welcome to Scope's forum. It is great to see you have joined us. Yes, as @Ross_Scope said, thank you for raising this important point. Your post made me smile though because I am proud to say I am nearing the end of my MA in SEND! <3
    Community Volunteer Adviser with professional knowledge of education, special educational needs and disabilities and EHCP's. Pronouns: She/her. 

    Please note: if I use the online community outside of its hours of administration, I am doing so in a personal capacity only.
  • L_Volunteer
    L_Volunteer Community Volunteer Adviser, Scope Member Posts: 7,980 Championing
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    Hi @mikehughescq

    Yes, I strongly agree with you. Fortunately for me, I also have lived experience with SEND which is just supported by my MA. The MA usually gets my views heard thankfully. I always agree on an individualised approach that is strengths-based where possible. After all, isn't a positive student experience the most important? :D
    Community Volunteer Adviser with professional knowledge of education, special educational needs and disabilities and EHCP's. Pronouns: She/her. 

    Please note: if I use the online community outside of its hours of administration, I am doing so in a personal capacity only.
  • russelln
    russelln Community member Posts: 4 Listener
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    Coming from a school where the SENCO had all the training available and yet single handedly managed to withold and delay support for my child until she wanted to die, I can say with certainty that a qualified SENCO means nothing.

    We are now at a school with a SENCO who is still in training but whose attitude and experience are 100 times better than the previous school.  This is truly what matters to be able to uncover children's needs and chase provision for them.
  • Tori_Scope
    Tori_Scope Scope Posts: 12,499 Championing
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    I'm sorry that you and your child had to go through that distressing experience @russelln. Not being able to access the right help can certainly take a toll on people's mental health. I'm glad that the SENCo at the new school is better :) How's your child doing now? 

    National Campaigns Officer at Scope, she/her

  • russelln
    russelln Community member Posts: 4 Listener
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    Thank you @Tori_Scope. Her mental health is way better now and it is great to be able to problem solve things together with the new school.  It's what collaborative working should look like.
  • Tori_Scope
    Tori_Scope Scope Posts: 12,499 Championing
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    That's great to hear @russelln :) And yes, indeed! I can see you've started sharing advice based on your experiences on other threads, which is fantastic to see. 

    National Campaigns Officer at Scope, she/her

  • Danielle_2022
    Danielle_2022 Community member Posts: 266 Empowering
    edited February 2022
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    Hiya @redapple,
    I went to mainstream school throughout my education and share many of your feelings. I was the only visibly disabled student in school at the time, which meant that the staff were just simply not equipped to support me. I think there’s so much to be said for lived experience in these situations, too.

    Your MA will be such an important part of change being made in the future, @L_Volunteer :)
    Community Volunteer Host (she/her) with a passion for writing and making the world a better place for disabled people to exist.
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