I think parents of children who have send have no idea what actually happens in schools — Scope | Disability forum
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I think parents of children who have send have no idea what actually happens in schools

redapple
redapple Member Posts: 1 Listener
edited November 4 in Education
I understand exactly how you feel. I think parents of children who have send have no idea what actually happens in schools. That only ONE person in a WHOLE school has to have ANY qualifications in additional needs(and even then it only applies to SENCos that started after 2008). In fact they only have to get some training three years after they started the job( 2015 Code of Practice). That the Carter Review in 2015 found that there was virtually no training in supporting children with special educational needs on new teacher training courses. Also in independent and special schools ANYONE can be the SENCo and that they never need to get any training at all.
www.specialeducationalneeds.co.uk/uploads/1/1/4/6/11463509/senco_-_key_information_guide__3.pdf
I would recommend that any parent, before allowing their child to join a new school, should check does the SENCo have the NASEN level 7 award or a masters degree in specifically special educational needs for young people or something similar. 
Please, please check that the people looking after your child who might need specialist, trained support is qualified to do so.

Comments

  • Ross_Scope
    Ross_Scope Posts: 5,416

    Scope community team

    Hello @redapple and welcome to the community, thank you for raising such an important subject and providing your perspective. I hope that other parents find your post helpful.

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  • L_Volunteer
    L_Volunteer Community Volunteer Adviser Posts: 567 Pioneering
    Hi @redapple

    Welcome to Scope's forum. It is great to see you have joined us. Yes, as @Ross_Scope said, thank you for raising this important point. Your post made me smile though because I am proud to say I am nearing the end of my MA in SEND! <3
    I am a Scope volunteer. I have knowledge about the following subjects, gained through professional settings such as high level education or employment: autism spectrum disorder, dyslexia, down's syndrome, social, emotional and mental health difficulties, assistive technology and education. Pronouns: She/her.
  • mikehughescq
    mikehughescq Member Posts: 7,797 Disability Gamechanger
    The problem with SEN in schools isn’t really to do with qualifications. It’s to do with the slanting of the form and the process itself. It emphasises what a child can do rather than what they can’t; offers template solutions rather than individualised ones and doesn’t require a clearly indicated timescale for putting stuff in place. You have to also love the fact that it’s written as though EA 10 simply doesn’t exist. To read most EHCPs you would think quadriplegic children had a bit of a cold.

    If you want action for your child within an educational setting it’s often best to bypass the SEN aspect; put it in writing and detail it as reasonable adjustments under EA 10.  
  • L_Volunteer
    L_Volunteer Community Volunteer Adviser Posts: 567 Pioneering
    Hi @mikehughescq

    Yes, I strongly agree with you. Fortunately for me, I also have lived experience with SEND which is just supported by my MA. The MA usually gets my views heard thankfully. I always agree on an individualised approach that is strengths-based where possible. After all, isn't a positive student experience the most important? :D
    I am a Scope volunteer. I have knowledge about the following subjects, gained through professional settings such as high level education or employment: autism spectrum disorder, dyslexia, down's syndrome, social, emotional and mental health difficulties, assistive technology and education. Pronouns: She/her.
  • mikehughescq
    mikehughescq Member Posts: 7,797 Disability Gamechanger
    There is a fundamental reason why EHCPs are hard to get and that’s the focus on a strength based approach. It’s a huge mistake which keeps getting made. 

    The plan is meant to level the playing field but if you focus on strengths then you end up using those to avoid address those areas where the child is struggling and needs help. As one parent put it to me they don’t need to know their strengths. They know those better than anyone in their school. They also know most of the things they clearly struggle with but after 11 years They’ve yet to see an EHCP which actually addressed and resolved more than 25% of their child’s issues. 

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