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Working from Home

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ash5896
ash5896 Community member Posts: 148 Pioneering
edited November 2021 in Work and employment
Ok, another question relating to work and apologies for the constant questions.
My employer offers hybrid working so you can have the option of working from home and office. As I have a chair bespoke to me I’ve been told I can’t have the option of working from home as I don’t have the appropriate equipment. If I was given the option to work from home it would save me around 15 hours a week in travel alone which is a nightmare in itself and exacerbates my pain in legs and back. 
I really think it’s unfair as at the same time my employer says they are diverse and inclusive and i don’t agree at the moment. 
Any advice and thoughts would be greatly appreciated. 
Ash 

Comments

  • janer1967
    janer1967 Community member Posts: 21,964 Disability Gamechanger
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    Hi there

    I would put in a request for reasonable adjustments under the equality act 

    It maybe worth enquiries about getting the right equipment then they would be able to accommodate 
  • ash5896
    ash5896 Community member Posts: 148 Pioneering
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    janer1967 said:
    Hi there

    I would put in a request for reasonable adjustments under the equality act 

    It maybe worth enquiries about getting the right equipment then they would be able to accommodate 
    I think the cost of the equipment is the issue. The chair was really expensive and to provide a chair for home at the same cost would be the same. Access to work paid for it not my employer. Thank you for this I’ll mention it to my manager and see what response I get 
    Ash 
  • janer1967
    janer1967 Community member Posts: 21,964 Disability Gamechanger
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    I presumed it would be cost that was the issue can you not have the chair at home if it was paid for by access to work 

    Could you fund a chair yourself 

    Cost can be a valid reason for refusing a reasonable adjustments 
  • Reg
    Reg Community member Posts: 109 Pioneering
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    Hello @ash5896

    I used to work in an office and inherited a specialist chair from a previous employee. I found that the chair could not compete with the affect of the daily commute as however comfy the chair was I was shattered by just getting to work.

    If you are saving money on the commute I wondered if it was worth investing in an office chair that is comfy for you at home? The chair I inherited at the office ( after another disabled person left) cost around £1,000 but I was able to buy a very comfy chair for £150 that is just as comfy as the old office one- if not more so as I can move around at home and do not have the commute to cope with.

    I assume your employer may be concerned that if you do not have an OT recommended chair at home that you might be able to complain if your condition worsens and hence their stance about commuting into work. 

    Hope you can find a solution  
    Reg

    I am a Scope volunteer.
  • famparvaiz0
    famparvaiz0 Community member Posts: 1 Listener
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    Interesting discussion. I'm also working from home since first wave of corona. But In start I faced some problems like back pain or neck pain. The good office chair helps a lot in comfort.

  • Geoark
    Geoark Community member Posts: 1,471 Disability Gamechanger
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    Hi @ash5896

    There are probably a number of things that are affecting the decision making at work. At work I had to jump through a number of loops to get permission for the adjustments I wanted, even when paying for them out of my own pocket. After involving our ability network and the support of my manager it was finally agreed that I could have some of the adjustments as part of a local agreement with my manager. The issue was often a conflict between H&S, HR and management. With H&S taking the lead and concerns about setting a precedent.

    Even when we were sent home to work and work gave allowances to cover some of the costs like chair, desk light, keyboard and mouse etc I still preferred to spend my own money so that I could get what worked for me.

    Moving to the present, my set up at home is far more beneficial to me than the work set up, and while expensive to set up it was worth the expense. As suggested by @famparvaiz0 a decent gaming chair can provide a lot of the benefits akin to the office one, but do some research first. I would talk to your employers first before buying the chair you pick to ensure they are happy with your decision. Even though you may be working from home they still have a duty to care and ensure that your home set up is suitable.

    I would say it is 100% worth going for one of the more expensive gaming chairs, as well as giving a lot of thought about what you need from the chair. The one I bought has been used used constantly 7 days a week in excess of 8 hours a day for two years. I now need to replace the additional cushion I bought with a hole in it so no weight was put on the bottom of my spine while sitting. Depending on your issues it may be worth considering spending a bit more to have the chair assembled for you, as they often come disassembled.

    It can also take a few tries to get it set up right for you, as it will not be set up for your particular needs.

    Also give some thought to where you will be working. To start off I used a table, which was fine previously when working from home when my sciatica was playing up. But on a more permanent basis you may want to find a space where you can set thing up on a more permanent basis. I chose the bedroom as it had more space, give more privacy as I am often in meetings or speaking to colleagues and customers. It also meant I could fit in a full size office desk, along with lockable drawers which help meet data protection concerns. However I do appreciate that space can sometimes be a premium.

    The other issue, which often gets overlooked, working from home during the pandemic was not an issue, but as a social tenant there are clauses in my tenancy regarding the use of our home. This was not a major issue, I spoke to my housing officer when the possibility of working from home may become a permanent part of my job and there was no issue, as it would not involve people visiting my home. I was also told I would not need formal permission, but got it anyway to avoid future problems.

    As an individual I stood alone.
    As a member of a group I did things.
    As part of a community I helped to create change!

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