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Self employment whilst waiting for WCA?

bluee14
bluee14 Member Posts: 2 Listener
Hi! 

So I've recently started getting Universal Credit. I've just sent off my UC50 forms, so I haven't had any response to those or been officially assessed as LCW or LCWRA yet, but my work coach is aware that I'm not currently able to work due to my health.

I've also just started a bit of "self employment", spending maybe 5 hours a week doing graphic design work. I haven't earned any money yet, and I expect to get a payout of around £30 in mid December. Eventually this should increase. I understand that if you're assessed as LCW or LCWRA then you can earn under a certain amount without it being an issue.

But I'm wondering if reporting this self employment before I've been assessed is going to cause any problems? Because other than a fit note, I don't have any official "proof" in their system yet of my inability to work, and I don't want it to make it look like I'm able to work when I can't. 

Also, when I do report it, do I do it on my online account under Report a Change > Work and Earnings? Or is that only for people making significant money through self employment? 

Thanks in advance! 

Comments

  • poppy123456
    poppy123456 Member Posts: 25,573 Disability Gamechanger
    edited November 2021
    If you're working then you need to report the changes now onto your journal, even though you haven't earned any money yet. Any earnings and expenses need to be reported at the end of your assessment period. Information here. https://www.gov.uk/self-employment-and-universal-credit
    If you have dependant children on your claim then you will already have the work allowance. If you don't and you're found to have either LCW or LCWRA then you can earn £515 per month (£557 from December), if you don't claim for help with the rent. Or £293 (£335 from December) if you do claim for help with the rent. See link. https://www.entitledto.co.uk/help/work-allowance-universal-credit
    If the work you do contradicts the reasons why you're claiming LCW/LCWRA then yes it could go against you when the decision's made.


  • bluee14
    bluee14 Member Posts: 2 Listener
    @poppy123456 thanks for that. No, the self employment I'm doing doesn't contradict the reasons why I can't work. I'm just not sure what's going to happen in their system when I say that I'm self-employed, even though I'm making very little money, because I don't have dependant children and I haven't yet been assessed as LCW or LCWRA. So I don't know if I have a work allowance yet, or if my Universal Credit will be deducted until I'm assessed. Most importantly I just don't want the process of getting my WCA to be mistakenly stopped or disrupted. 
  • poppy123456
    poppy123456 Member Posts: 25,573 Disability Gamechanger
    This means you won't have the work allowance until you're found to have either LCW or LCWRA. Until then any earnings you recieve during your assessment period will reduce your UC by 63% (55% from December)
    First thing you need to do is report the changes that you're working self employed onto your journal.
  • calcotti
    calcotti Member Posts: 3,765 Disability Gamechanger
    bluee14 said:
     I understand that if you're assessed as LCW or LCWRA then you can earn under a certain amount without it being an issue.
    There are no such limits for UC
    Information I post is for England unless otherwise stated. Rules may be different in other parts of UK.

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