PIP, DLA and AA
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Heart troubles, mobility PIP

hortushortus Member Posts: 1 Listener
Hi there. I am hoping for some advice as to whether I should try PIP for mobility issues. I have dilated cardiomyopathy (enlarged weak heart that doesn't pump pump blood very good leading to chest pain and breathlessness) that enables me to walk anywhere down hill or on the flat for as long as I need. The problem comes when I walk up hill. I live on a hill and now can't walk back up the 1.5 miles from the Town where the shops, banks, doctors, pharmacy etc etc are. I have lost my independence and stay in the house for the most part. I'm hoping that with the mobility element I can finance the bus getting back up the hill, giving me some life that I had before.

When I read about PIP mobility I understand it as being not acceptable to be awarded if you can walk 20/50 metres at all. I can, very much so, but not uphill.

Is it worth me putting myself through the stress of even trying because I'm doubtful I even fit the brief.

Any feedback would be appreciated. 

Replies

  • Tigermoth42Tigermoth42 Member Posts: 242 Pioneering
    Hi @hortus, so sorry to read about your difficulties. I would put in a claim. The criteria is Reliably. To be assessed as able to carry out an activity to the level described in a descriptor, a claimant must satisfy the descriptor “reliably”, that is: safely, to an acceptable standard, repeatedly and in reasonable time. Therefore if you can’t do a particular activity following these guidelines then you may well be entitled to some help. Do let us know how you get on.
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    Hi,

    PIP isn't awarded based on a diagnosis, it's how those conditions affect you daily and how you are at least 50% of the time. No one can tell you if an award is possible because we don't know how your condition affects you. There's also the daily living part, not just the mobility.

    PIP is also for those aged between 16-64, once you reach 65 it then becomes Attendance Allowance.

    Take a look and complete the PIP self test http://www.mybenefitsandwork.co.uk/pip/indexxx.php It's just a guide so bear that in mind also. Evidence will be needed to support your claim and should be sent with the forms when you return them.

    If you do decide to apply then i'd advise getting help with filling those forms in.

    Proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice I have given to members here on the community.
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    The only issue i can see that you may have with the mobility part is that you say you only have the problem when walking up a hill and as you say you don't have any problems otherwise then you may not score the points. Of course there's the daily living part with a lot more descriptors that you may score points in.
    Proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice I have given to members here on the community.
  • MisscleoMisscleo Member Posts: 646 Pioneering
    Something wrong here im 70 and i get pip not atendance allowance.
    ??
    Just saying cos the post above says it swops when your 65 
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    Misscleo said:
    Something wrong here im 70 and i get pip not atendance allowance.
    ??
    Just saying cos the post above says it swops when your 65 
    That's because you already have a PIP claim and it will continue for as long as you qualify for it but you'll continue to be re-assessed.

    My comment above was for those who don't already claim PIP. If your past the PIP age limit and don't already have a PIP award then you can't claim it. It's AA.
    Proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice I have given to members here on the community.
  • MatildaMatilda Member Posts: 2,616 Disability Gamechanger
    @hortus

    You might be eligible for a disabled person's freedom pass at the discretion of your local authority.  Suggest you contact them for more info.
  • YadnadYadnad Posts: 2,856 Member
    edited August 2018
    Hi @hortus, so sorry to read about your difficulties. I would put in a claim. The criteria is Reliably. To be assessed as able to carry out an activity to the level described in a descriptor, a claimant must satisfy the descriptor “reliably”, that is: safely, to an acceptable standard, repeatedly and in reasonable time. Therefore if you can’t do a particular activity following these guidelines then you may well be entitled to some help. Do let us know how you get on.
    From what the poster has said he can walk on the flat or downhill an unlimited distance. His only problem is going up hill.

    I have tried and failed to find the meaning behind the walking descriptor. However from memory isn't the walking ability tested only on level ground? Logic dictates this to be the case as if it is not then the fact that most could not walk up say Everest aided or unaided could result in an award. I doubt that the DWP would be testing the ability to walk up mountains.

    If so then no award could be given for mobility which is the only thing that he is interested in.
  • Tigermoth42Tigermoth42 Member Posts: 242 Pioneering
    Hi @Yadnad, thinking about it, the mobility part would be assessed as being on level ground as you say. I can’t find anything directly relating to it either but it makes sense. Thank you for pointing it out, my head wasn’t in thinking mode when I replied 😁
  • YadnadYadnad Posts: 2,856 Member
    Thanks Mike that answers the question I believe.


  • Chloe_ScopeChloe_Scope Scope Posts: 10,653 Disability Gamechanger
    Hi @hortus, how are you doing? Did you decide to put in a claim? Please let us know if there is anything else we can do to support you through this :)
    Scope

  • MisscleoMisscleo Member Posts: 646 Pioneering
    Besides the bus pass you can have a pass for the train....if you live by a station.
    You get a third off 
  • mikehughescqmikehughescq Member Posts: 6,241 Disability Gamechanger
    Not needed in a lot of areas unless you travel outside the area. A lot of areas have a local variation on the National Concessionary Travel Scheme which includes rail travel.
  • YadnadYadnad Posts: 2,856 Member
    Unfortunately Kent does not include rail travel.
    To be honest I don't blame them - they have a monopoly in that the service is under pressure in terms of numbers and the price of tickets keeps on rising - it is a big commuter area into and out of London  
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