Do you have any advice on encouraging a tactile defensive teenage boy to to shave? — Scope | Disability forum
New to the community? Remember to read our community guidelines and our community house rules.
Concerned about another member's safety or wellbeing? Find out how to let us know.

Do you have any advice on encouraging a tactile defensive teenage boy to to shave?

Comments

  • Naomi
    Naomi Member Posts: 29 Listener
    Hi Arlene,
    I wonder if you have any advice on encouraging a tactile defensive teenage boy to to shave? Someone on the site has suggested using an electric toothbrush to get him used to the throbbing sensation, which is certainly a good idea, but if you have any other thoughts on this I would love to hear them.
  • BusyOT
    BusyOT Member Posts: 76
    edited March 2015
    Hi Naomi, my first thought is "does he have to shave?". I guess the answer to that depends on his age and peer group.
    If he does have to shave though then there are a few options you could try. It's tricky when I don't know the person and their particular preferences but I'll list some of the things that I would think about ..
    - Shave gel / foam / cream etc
    - Electric / Manual Razor
    - Time, ensure it's a time he's calm & relaxed, possibly after an enjoyable activity
    - Place, in the bath is often successful
    - Can he do it himself or does he need assistance? He will potentially be less defensive if he does it himself.
    - If the sensation of shaving has been really difficult how can you "make it go away"? I would use the techniques & strategies that you currently use in other situations.
    It may be that he won't be able to shave "regularly" but only when he is able to tolerate it.
    Do stay in touch and let us know how you get on.


  • Naomi
    Naomi Member Posts: 29 Listener
    Hi, many thanks for this. Yes, I would like him to shave, fortunately he is quite fair so is unlikely to be too hairy. I have encouraged him to hold a razor in the bath and to touch the foam. I think it will be this part which is the most difficult as he is very tactile defensive, whereas he is now learning to clean his own teeth with an electric toothbrush so in theory should learn how to use electric razor. Anyway I shall perservere with this and let you know how i get on. Thanks again for your help.
  • BusyOT
    BusyOT Member Posts: 76
    Hi Naomi - I've just had another thought - Immac or Veet as it's now called. If he can tolerate cream on his face, or you can build up his tolerance then it might be more acceptable than a razor.
  • Emma
    Emma Member Posts: 85 Connected
    Ooh I hate to butt in, but a friend of mine tried hair remover on her 14-year-old son's moustache and it brought him out in a rash! If you are going to go down that route, Naomi, I would try a small amount first and test for reactions. Emma.

Brightness

Do you need advice on your energy costs?


Scope’s Disability Energy Support service is open to any disabled household in England or Wales in which one or more disabled people live. You can get free advice from an expert adviser on managing energy debt, switching tariffs, contacting your supplier and more. Find out more information by visiting our
Disability Energy Support webpage.

Fancy a chat in our virtual coffee lounge?

Put the kettle on and have a chat in our coffee lounge with other members. We talk about hobbies, games and anything else you can think of!

Cerebral Palsy (CP) Online Cafe

Here's a new opportunity for people with CP or a similar disability (aged 20+) to get together and chat. The sessions are in partnership with CP Sport so you can find out more and meet people from both organisations.

Are you struggling?

Read our 'Coping with stress, low mood and isolation' support thread for a run-down of ideas on how to banish those blues and feel happier.

What do you think about the community?

Complete our feedback form and tell us how we can make the community a better space for you.

Information about COVID-19

If you have questions about the virus, please read our information and support which includes guidance on benefits, getting food and essentials and Cerebral Palsy.

Back to school this September?

Read tips on how to settle back in and handle any worries you or your children might be having this new term.