Housing and independent living
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Bringing my learning disabled 18 yr old son home

SullySully Member Posts: 1 Listener
Hi to you all,
Sorry to dive straight in but I am a bit bamboozled by the maze of bureaucracy i have been introduced to by my son's Social Worker with regards to bringing him home.

In short, seven months ago he moved to supported living which has been shockingly badly run and a disaster from day one. It has got the point where we simply want to bring him home.

However, we are told that this will now be subject to a Best Interests meeting at which the care home who have been subject to two formal complaints, (Both upheld), and a Local Authority Safeguarding investigation will have a say!

It is obviously in their financial interests to block this.

Is this right??

Replies

  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 689 Listener
    The user and all related content has been deleted.
  • Sam_ScopeSam_Scope Member Posts: 7,732 Disability Gamechanger
    HI @Sully welcome to the community. This sounds really stressful!  @DebbieVoakes I wondered if you had any information or support for Sully?

    You can also call the helpline on 0808 800 3333 
    Scope
    Senior online community officer
  • Hello @sully,

    Firstly of all I'm so sorry to read about your situation with trying to bring your son home, hopefully I can add something that might help here.

    A best interests meeting will be held where an adult (over 16 years of age) has been deemed not to have the mental capacity to make decisions about their life, and any agencies involved with supporting the person in question will be asked to attend (regardless of whether they have failed to adhere to delivering the expected support). The meeting will usually be held because the decision is not clear cut and the individuals circumstances are complex.

    So yes it is right that the housing provider will be expected to attend the meeting and express their professional opinion on what is the best housing option for your son, however the decision will not be made solely on what the housing provider says. Usually these meetings are chaired by a general manager/ principle practitioner, however it is down to the decision maker for your son to decide what the best course of action is (are you aware of who this will be for your son?). This isn't necessarily the end though, if you are not happy with the outcome of the best interests meeting, or an agreement from all agencies is not reached, the decision maker will have to take the case to the Court of Protection to seek legal advice and to ultimately make the decision.

    The key thing to remember is that this meeting is about what's best for your son, and although the process might seem quite daunting this meeting will be an opportunity for yourself, and everyone else that supports your son, to share what they think is best for you son - it is illegal to base this decision on anything else (such as financial incentives for the housing provider). If you want to have a look for more information on this process, and ensure that it is being treated correctly have a look at:

    www.scie.org.uk or www.best-interests.co.uk

    I hope this information helps - please do let us know how you get on.

    Kindest regards,

    Kirsty





  • Apologies one of the links I've given isn't accurate (the website has changed) - for guidance on practice have a look here:

    http://www.scie.org.uk/mca-directory/

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