PIP, DLA and AA
If this is your first visit, check out the community guide. You will have to Join us or Sign in before you can post.

What happens at Reviews?

wildlifewildlife Member Posts: 1,314 Pioneering
Hi Everyone, I will be due for review in only 2 years or slightly less. Will I have another face to even if strong evidence is given? Would I be better to ask for a Supersession to increase my DL from standard rate to higher rate?

Replies

  • Sam_AlumniSam_Alumni Scope alumni Posts: 7,731 Disability Gamechanger
    From the CAB website:

    The questions in the PIP review form are based on the same everyday tasks and activities that are covered by the PIP claim form, for example preparing food, mixing with other people and moving around.
    You have to tick a box to say if you’re finding each task or activity easier or harder since your last assessment - or if there’s been no change. It’s fine to tick ‘no change’ for every question if nothing’s changed since your last assessment. If you do this your PIP should continue as usual.
    The DWP will write to let you know what they’ve decided. You can challenge the decision if you disagree with it.
    If you say that something’s changed the DWP might:
    • phone you to ask for more information
    • ask you to give them more evidence to show how your condition affects you
    • ask you to go to a face-to-face assessment
    • ask you to complete another PIP2 form (just so they can get the information they need - you won’t have to make a new claim)
    If you tell the DWP that nothing’s changed, it’s unlikely that you’ll need to do any of these until it’s time for you to make a new PIP claim.

    I hope this helps!

    Scope
    Senior online community officer
  • wildlifewildlife Member Posts: 1,314 Pioneering
    edited August 2017
    @Sam_Scope Thank-you that's very helpful. There will be changes as I decided to stick with higher rate mobility and standard DL rather than go through the stress of a Tribunal. I lost out because the assessor said my upper body strength was normal, lies of course. I am seeing my GP soon to ask for a referral to a neurologist although I doubt she'll agree. The reason being I also suffer from an acute health anxiety about hospital tests so her philosophy is if there's no cure or treatment the effects on me would out way any benefit. I can't tell her I need evidence for PIP she won't accept that as a reason to refer me. I don't know how other people seem to have knowledge of their physical defects regarding degenerative conditions but our surgery just accept it's part of the aging process. No wonder the NHS is so stretched when the benefit system is not believing claimants. My GP told me the government had told DWP they had to believe disabled people to save GP's having to write so many letters. I've seen no evidence of this so far..
  • NasmamuNasmamu Member Posts: 45 Connected
    edited August 2017
    wildlife said:
    @Sam_Scope Thank-you that's very helpful. There will be changes as I decided to stick with higher rate mobility and standard DL rather than go through the stress of a Tribunal. I lost out because the assessor said my upper body strength was normal, lies of course. I am seeing my GP soon to ask for a referral to a neurologist although I doubt she'll agree. The reason being I also suffer from an acute health anxiety about hospital tests so her philosophy is if there's no cure or treatment the effects on me would out way any benefit. I can't tell her I need evidence for PIP she won't accept that as a reason to refer me. I don't know how other people seem to have knowledge of their physical defects regarding degenerative conditions but our surgery just accept it's part of the aging process. No wonder the NHS is so stretched when the benefit system is not believing claimants. My GP told me the government had told DWP they had to believe disabled people to save GP's having to write so many letters. I've seen no evidence of this so far..
    wildlife I know exactly where you're coming from. The system is absolutely flawed in so many ways but particularly where lifetime disability conditions are concerned. GP's aren't interested after a certain age. It's so sad to think there are literally thousands of adults who were born with conditions that they fail to help with after you turn 18. Seen so many posts of people with disabilities who've not been checked on/helped or treated after becoming adults, I'm one of them. Now the DWP want proof of treatment and there's nothing because nobody seems to care. Went to my GP and asked for a letter regarding my CP and he said "you have CP?..since when?
  • wildlifewildlife Member Posts: 1,314 Pioneering
    @Nasmamu Totally agree but it's not just conditions from birth that have not been accounted for. As my MP pointed out neurological damage from life events is also disregarded. Along with mental health which he also said was lacking in recognition in the PIP process. My main gripe as I've said all along is that there is no encouragement to do anything to either improve your condition or your quality of life as you have to appear as bad as you can be for the assessment and remain like that in order to get through the ridiculous limited timescales they're putting on successful claims. I'm 66 now and anyone with an ounce of common sense reading Q15 on my claim which described 4 falls, 9 operations and 5 road accidents, 1 of them serious would not have placed a 3 year timescale before review. I know I should have appealed but couldn't face the trauma plus wanting to turn my attention to complaints I'd made which are still unresolved. The silence from ATOS is telling it's own story. I hope you'll be able to get the evidence you need about the CP but even then they ignore medical evidence in favour of a 1 hour assessment with someone who wants to turn you down..  
Sign in or join us to comment.