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Advise on pip interview

luciepluciep Member Posts: 6 Listener
 Hi. I have received standard daily living since July last year granted for 2 years. I have chronic fatigue, chronic pain and severe depression and insomnia.I work part time which I struggle with very much  but I refuse to give it up as when I'm not at working even for just a few hrs a week I quickly become suicidal. 
I have another interview come through as I stated on my update form that the distance I can walk is different everyday and also I struggle with incontinence now and struggle to manage it due to fatigue. 
I have bad anxiety and I'm worrying endlessly about this interview, will I be just asked about the walking and toilet needs or will they go through the whole lot again? 
Its so hard to describe problems with mobility and some days I cannot hardly walk at all and others I can go for a walk, it's also much worse in the morning I never walk more than a few steps in a morning but by tea time I can sometimes go for a walk I can't explain why it's just how it is for me . How do I explain that in interview 
Thank you 

Replies

  • MatildaMatilda Member Posts: 2,616 Disability Gamechanger
    @luciep

    I think it's best to keep things simple for assessors and the DWP, and Tribunals.  I was about to explain to my assessor that I have five bad days a week on average - and her eyes began to glaze over.  So I amended that to five bad days a week without any qualification, and she seemed happy.

    CAB recommend that you don't tick the 'it varies' box in the walking distance question on the PIP2 form.  Gives assessors and DWP too much scope to decide that you can walk well most of the time.  Tick a specific box.

    They might well go through the lot again.  With walking, If this is bad for most of the day on at least four days a week, then your walking is bad at least four days a week.  

    I found that my assessor, and my Tribunal which I won, weren't interested in too much minutiae but rather in simpler estimates of inability to undertake the various activities.  Too much minute detail becomes confusing and it becomes difficult for assessors and Tribunals to assess the level of disability.


  • CockneyRebelCockneyRebel Member Posts: 5,258 Disability Gamechanger
    Hi and welcome luciep

    The assessment will be a full assessment.
    Mobility awards are based on the distance you can walk. You also have to be able to do it repeatedly, Safely, in a reasonable time and for the majority of time..

     Moving around.
    a. Can stand and then move more than 200 metres, either aided or unaided.  0 points.
    b. Can stand and then move more than 50 metres but no more than 200 metres, either aided or unaided.  4 points.
    c. Can stand and then move unaided more than 20 metres but no more than 50 metres.  8 points.
    d. Can stand and then move using an aid or appliance more than 20 metres but no more than 50 metres.  10 points.
    e. Can stand and then move more than 1 metre but no more than 20 metres, either aided or unaided.  12 points.
    f. Cannot, either aided or unaided, –
    (i) stand; or
    (ii) move more than 1 metre.  12 points.

    So which of these desciptors best fits your walking ?
    apply the following factors to each

    Repeatedly - as often as is needed, can you walk 20metres ? without stopping ?
                         Can you then repeat this witout suffering undue pain ?
    In a timely manner - How long does it take you ?
                                    Nornal walking -                          90 metre in a minute
                                   Slow pace including stopping -   45 metre in a  minute
    For the majority of days- How many days of the week can you do your
                                           minimum distance ? If you can only manage
                                          your minimum distance on four days of the week
                                          but on the other three you can walk further
                                         this would be for the majority of time.

    Hope that helps please come back with any other questions

    CR
    Be all you can be, make  every day count. Namaste
  • MatildaMatilda Member Posts: 2,616 Disability Gamechanger
    @luciep

    You might want to re-post in Ask a benefits advisor category to get a benefits expert's take on your questions.
  • luciepluciep Member Posts: 6 Listener
    Thank you. So when you report a change  you have a total re assessment even though I ticked no change on every other question.?
    I'm still really struggling with the walking question as at least 3 days I week I can only walk around my flat and that is hard then I occasionally have a day I have aday I can walk around the lake. In a way I don't want mobility as I don't want to feel paranoid on the rare day I feel a little better if I enjoy a walk.
    i also spent 6 years as an anorexic and that never quite leaves you. I have many times forced my self to walk around my estate to burn calories even when I'm ill only to be have to be picked up by my mum as I physically not take one more step. But if I don't do this I don't feel I can eat on some days 
    Is there a easy way to move this to the benefits section? 

    Thank you 
  • MatildaMatilda Member Posts: 2,616 Disability Gamechanger
    @luciep

    Admin will move your thread to the Ask a benefits advisor category tomorrow.

    @Sam_Scope

    Please can you move this thread to Ask a benefits advisor for @luciep, please?
  • BenefitsTrainingCoBenefitsTrainingCo Member Posts: 2,692 Pioneering
    luciep,

    Thanks for posting, and Matilda, thanks so much for getting the thread moved.

    CR is right, this will be a full assessment. Unfortunately, it they decide on the basis of the review form (or a new PIP2) that something has changed and they need to request an assessment, that does mean the whole thing.

    When it comes to questions about your walking, I recommend being upfront and simple, as Matilda suggests. So, you could say that MOST days, you cannot walk any more than round your flat. Also, you can't walk very far because there is a risk - you have to be able to do things safely, in order to be assessed as doing them, so you could emphasise that there is a lot of risk if you try to walk further.

    'Safely' is another of the principles, like repeatedly, in a reasonable time period, and to an acceptable standard, which CR mentions above. If you can't do something safely, then you can't do it. If you can't do it repeatedly (as often as you might reasonably need to, eg to go to work or see friends or get some fresh air), then you can't do it. As CR mentions, pain, fatigue and slowness are all relevant too.

    I would have a look at the other activities and points because with all the problems you mention, I'm sure you would score in daily living activities as well, and possibly in planning and following a journey.

    http://www.mybenefitsandwork.co.uk/pip/indexxx.php


    Just thinking about what points you think you should get can help you feel clearer about what you need to say. But I'd be aware, you may not get to say everything you want to! Unfortunately the assessors have a rather rote way of getting through the activities and you may feel not listened to...so if they say anything about you which isn't true in their report, consider complaining.

    I'd also bear in mind that the law is clear that if you have a problem on even part of a day which is significant enough to affect your life (for example, you are worse in the morning so you have to wait until you can go out), then you have a problem on that day, and it counts towards the over 50% of days you need to have. I don't think assessors will have any idea about this case though, so going back to Matilda's advice, a summary of this might be that you have problems EVERY day, only some days it gets better by the evening? And that is simply not enough to live a life which isn't affected by your disability, so you should get points.

    I really hope everything goes well for you. If it doesn't, and you need to challenge the decision, please come back for advice.

    Will


    The Benefits Training Co:
    Paul Bradley
    Michael Chambers
    Will Hadwen
    Sarah Hayle
    Maria Solomon
    David Stickland
  • luciepluciep Member Posts: 6 Listener
    Thank you so much this is very helpful 
    I get so anxious about these interviews as I find it so hard to communicate how unwell I feel and how I rely on others 
  • luciepluciep Member Posts: 6 Listener
    One last question please With the question communicating with others. I can usually talk to people I know well but often struggle because of fatigue and depression to hold a conversation but at work although I'm quiet I can generally talk when I need to go collegues I know well but I cannot talk to anyone I don't know and my boss is very understanding he sits me in the same seat away from people and next to a very quiet lady Iv known for many years. he would never make me talk to someone I don't know. Plus although I only work short shifts if I have spoken a lot at work I'm so exhausted when I get home I can only give one word answers or grunts or shrugs to anyone I need to communicate with at home. I'm dreading this interview as I get so wrapped up with nerves I freeze and can't speak much. Do you think it's best I go with my mum ?
  • NystagmiteNystagmite Member Posts: 609 Pioneering
    It's generally advised you take someone with you. I did and he did say some things that I don't realise I do.

    Also, if you do go alone, they will use this against you.
  • MatildaMatilda Member Posts: 2,616 Disability Gamechanger
    @luciep

    I attended my PIP assessment alone and I don't know if this was used against me or not - I was only awarded standard both components.  I also attended my tribunal hearing alone - and this definitely wasn't used against me as tribunal increased my award to enhanced both components.

    However, taking someone with you definitely would give moral support.
  • BenefitsTrainingCoBenefitsTrainingCo Member Posts: 2,692 Pioneering

    Hi @luciep

    If having your mother with you may help you to stay more calm and to gather your thoughts more clearly, then definitely take her.

    It's certainly no harm done to take someone for support.

    Good luck!


    Mary

    The Benefits Training Co:
    Paul Bradley
    Michael Chambers
    Will Hadwen
    Sarah Hayle
    Maria Solomon
    David Stickland
  • luciepluciep Member Posts: 6 Listener
    HI
    today i had my assessment and I felt it went really badly, I was so nervous I was shaking and struggled to answer. She asked me about work and I work pt in an office, she asked me if I speak to people on the phone which I do but this is totally different to meeting people face to face. I struggle with people I don't know not as much on the phone surely talking on the phone is not mixing with people . I have lots of adjustments at work for mixing with new people but I didn't get chance to say those things. Plus she asked me if I go for a walk on a night and I said sometimes but I usually can't beacuse I'm shaking so.much but I couldn't physically say that. 
    the lady was a physio which I think is ridiculous how can a physio have any understanding of a serious mental health condition and dinural mood.
    i feel so low about this. Sorry 
  • luciepluciep Member Posts: 6 Listener
    Quick question. 
    As my assessment was a disaster I have got some extra evidence including a letter from my psychiatrist and one from my mum. Should I send that now or wait for the decision then send it. Thanks 
  • BenefitsTrainingCoBenefitsTrainingCo Member Posts: 2,692 Pioneering
    Hello luciep - I know this is hard, but please try not to dwell on your assessment and how badly you think it might have gone. The person assessing you may have a very different view to what you are thinking, and it may well work out fine. I think it would be a very good idea to send in your evidence quickly, before the decision is made. The person who assessed you will send their report to the DWP's decision maker, who has to look at all the evidence available before making a decision, so if you think your psychiatrist's letter and your mum's letter explain things well, then send them in tomorrow by tracked post, first class, and keep copies of everything. It may also be a good idea to call the DWP tomorrow and explain that you are sending in extra evidence and that you want the decision maker to wait for that evidence before making a decision. You could also perhaps write a letter yourself saying all the things you wanted to say in the assessment: the point about the adjustments that are in place at work is very important. 

    Definitely do this before the decision is made!

    I hope this helps. Get back to us if you need further information or help.

    Jayne
    The Benefits Training Co:
    Paul Bradley
    Michael Chambers
    Will Hadwen
    Sarah Hayle
    Maria Solomon
    David Stickland
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