PIP, DLA and AA
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Transferring from DLA to PIP

GainaGaina Member Posts: 133 Pioneering
Well, this week the dreaded brown envelope landed on my mat, inviting me to claim PIP (I current recieve DLA with higher rare mobility and lower rate care indefinitely as I have Spina Bifida).  I immediately rang the DWP and completed the first part of the process and the PIP2 form arrived on Thursday.

My main question at the moment is regarding evidence.  I have not had any specific treatment for my Spina Bifida since the  mid-80`s and have never visited my GP bar a course of antibiotics for flu in the early 90`s and treatment for a pressure sore 2 years ago.

My GP isn't an expert in my condition or how it impacts my daily life so I really don't know what they can give me that would be helpful.

Any advice gratefully received. :)

Replies

  • MatildaMatilda Member Posts: 2,616 Disability Gamechanger
    The only medical evidence submitted at all for PIP were my medical reports from when I first claimed DLA in 1998.  I did not ask either my GP or my consultant for reports for PIP because of course neither knows how my rheumatoid arthritis (RA) affects my daily living and mobility.  I was awarded standard both after assessment and enhanced both at tribunal hearing.

    Disability Rights UK site (DR) has a good guide to all stages of PIP, including a draft diary that you can adapt.  I recommend you submit a 7-day diary with your claim.  List all the aids you use on your claim form and in your diary.  Say so if you struggle even using aids.

    Think about how long it takes you to do things even if you often can finish them eventually.  Does it take you more than twice as long as an average person to wash/dress/prepare food/eat, even using aids? Do you have to rest for a while after washing/dressing.  Do you use aids to use the toilet (e.g. grab rail).  Do you use aids to take meds (rubber gripper to open bottles; dosette box?  Are there days when you cannot complete tasks because of pain, stiffness, fatigue?

    In the distance boxes in the mobility getting around section don't tick the 'it varies' box, choose a specific distance box.

    DWP, assessors (and tribunals) all consider that ability to do a lot of driving indicates strength and stamina which they think indicate low-level daily living needs.

    To qualify for PIP points you have to have at least 4 'bad' days a week, bad enough to meet the descriptors concerned.
  • GainaGaina Member Posts: 133 Pioneering
    Thanks @Matilda that's really helpful! :)
  • YadnadYadnad Posts: 2,856 Member
    Matilda said:
    In the distance boxes in the mobility getting around section don't tick the 'it varies' box, choose a specific distance box.
    DWP, assessors (and tribunals) all consider that ability to do a lot of driving indicates strength and stamina which they think indicate low-level daily living needs.

    If it varies it varies. Why are you suggesting that they don't tell the truth? If it's a physical thing that you cannot do then you can't do it. But if you can do it for a few days a week and not for the rest of the week surely that means it varies. I had my mobility assessed in hospital by the consultant whilst I was using a walking machine Three time he tried it for different speeds and incline - all resulted in me falling off. Therefore I can't do it. 
    As for driving, not only do those functions come into it but a whole host of mental health actions as well. 
  • dee4848dee4848 Member Posts: 218 Pioneering
    @Yadnad I agree with you totally it's so wrong .
  • GainaGaina Member Posts: 133 Pioneering
    Hi @Yadnad :) I understand what @dee4848 is saying, to be as specific as possible.  Fortunately (?) the distance question is academic as I cannot walk at all.
  • MatildaMatilda Member Posts: 2,616 Disability Gamechanger
    @Yadnad

    It's not my personal opinions.  CAB say don't tick 'it varies' box - gives assessor too much scope to decide you can walk farther than you can.

    And driving - not me personally, but DWP, assessors and tribunals all think that ability to drive a lot indicates strength and stamina.

    I'm just the messenger.  No point shooting the messenger.
  • dee4848dee4848 Member Posts: 218 Pioneering
    edited May 2018
    Gaina said:
    Hi @Yadnad :) I understand what @dee4848 is saying, to be as specific as possible.  Fortunately (?) the distance question is academic as I cannot walk at all.
    This is not just aimed at you, as @Matilda tends to say" Dont"quite a lot on here.
  • GainaGaina Member Posts: 133 Pioneering
    Matilda said:
    @Yadnad

    It's not my personal opinions.  CAB say don't tick 'it varies' box - gives assessor too much scope to decide you can walk farther than you can.

    And driving - not me personally, but DWP, assessors and tribunals all think that ability to drive a lot indicates strength and stamina.

    I'm just the messenger.  No point shooting the messenger.

    Yes, I read that advice from CAB too. As for driving is concerned, I do have a license but I don't drive at the moment as I can't get my wheelchair in and out of the car myself.
  • MatildaMatilda Member Posts: 2,616 Disability Gamechanger
    @dee4848

    I am only passing on advice various sources have given: CAB, Disability Rights UK, BenefitsTrainingCo, Scope staff, numerous members of the online community from their research and experience.

    Following the advice given by sources above enabled me to get the award I deserved at tribunal.

    People can take or leave any advice they like.  All I am recommending what was helpful to me.

    As for mobility, points are not awarded for variable walking distances; they are awarded for fitting specific categories, for example, 0-20m = 12 points = enhanced.

    You can choose the 'ignore' function in my profile so that you cannot read my posts if you don't like what I write.

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