General Disccussion about your connection to autism! — Scope | Disability forum
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General Disccussion about your connection to autism!

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  • SunshineLou
    SunshineLou Member Posts: 79 Pioneering
    My son has severe autism. He was diagnosed at 2 years old as it was very apparent even then. 
    He’s now 15 years old.
  • hartill77
    hartill77 Member Posts: 97 Courageous
    Hi @SunshineLou
    My Daughter is 11 and she was diagnosed when she was 9 but took us 3 years to get her diagnosis. 
  • Lillee
    Lillee Member Posts: 2 Listener
    My 31 yr old son was diagnosed with Asperger and Anxiety age 12. I had been to CAMS when he was 8, only to be told he was an intelligent child who had temper tantrums.
    Primary, Secondary, College, University been there done that.
    Currently on an ESA mandatory reconsideration after an abysmal health check stated he was now fit for work!
  • SunshineLou
    SunshineLou Member Posts: 79 Pioneering
    @hartill77 yeah it can be a very long road for some to get a diagnosis. 
    Much harder when the person is higher functioning of course.
    @Lillee I feel for you! The entire ESA and PIP/DLA assessment processes are terrible!
    I’ve been through it myself and have only just got the actual decision I should’ve had 4 years ago!! :( 
  • vysvader
    vysvader Member Posts: 133 Courageous
    edited July 2018
    I'm married, don't have any problem to make new friends (just later in the life, if they don't call me, I don't and we've never met), I'm very exploratory and communicative, can read faster than many people speak, and had worked as a waiter (with a big smile) and many other professions wherein none could expect any aspie... Either way, I've got traits of high functioning autism visible from the youngest age such as strong obsessivity & special interests (special for aspies), a problem to read facial expressions and meanings between lines (afterward). In fact, I spoke even sooner than other children just the voice lucks some affect, emotions, so it doesn't sound such well. I'm not without emotions but it doesn't project very well in my face gestures or voice. Also, all AQ tests pack me to HFASD.
    You can feel free to get in touch 
  • psych101
    psych101 Member Posts: 6 Listener
    I have ADHD, Asppergers Syndrome, Bi-polar disorder and emotional instability disorder, and even though i'm a qualified psychologist it is difficult at times. I graduated so that i can help others who suffer with the day to day turmoils of Autism and have worked for Autism West Midlands, i specialise in Autism and have researched it since i was diagnosed 15 years ago (aged 33). If there is Anyone who would like advice or just to talk in general about Autism i am more than happy to help. Best Wishes, Paul.
  • Ourania
    Ourania Member Posts: 15 Connected
    I have a son who will be 3 next month non verbal and we have history of autism in the family. St the moment we are on crszy long waiting lists to see speech therapist etc only support we get is via a programme though the local council. Can't see light at the end here...
  • debbiedo49
    debbiedo49 Member Posts: 2,904 Disability Gamechanger
    I have worked as a carer for adults on the autism spectrum, and now work with children on the spectrum. I think everyone is on the spectrum.
  • April2018mom
    April2018mom Posts: 2,868 Connected
    I have no connection with autism. My son was diagnosed with Spina Bifida prenatally. Not to say that he does not have autism. My mom’s best friend has it. He was diagnosed with autism about ten years ago. 
  • feir
    feir Member Posts: 395 Pioneering
    My son has this (along with mild learning difficulties and mental health issues), my best friends husband and most of her kids have it (she is an amazing source of knowledge and help in ASD matters). My sons best friend does as well, probably a few of them do but i don't know many of them that well.
  • fishingmum
    fishingmum Member Posts: 562 Pioneering
    2 sons with autism, one high functioning and one severely autistic who will never manage on his own.
    life is too short to let others make you miserable.
  • Jennypops82
    Jennypops82 Member Posts: 1 Listener
    My son is 4 and was dignosed with autism this year. Currently waiting for him to be seen by an educational psychologist before we register him for primary school. It took us 1 & half years to get through whole diagnostic process.
  • Chloe_Scope
    Chloe_Scope Scope Posts: 10,557 Disability Gamechanger
    My brother has aspergers and is 18 years old. I am incredible proud of what he has achieved. He has just finished his A-Levels (after really struggling with them) and is trying to find an apprenticeships in accountancy :)   
    Scope

  • hartill77
    hartill77 Member Posts: 97 Courageous
    My brother has aspergers and is 18 years old. I am incredible proud of what he has achieved. He has just finished his A-Levels (after really struggling with them) and is trying to find an apprenticeships in accountancy :)   
    Thats Amazing! 
  • hartill77
    hartill77 Member Posts: 97 Courageous
    My son is 4 and was dignosed with autism this year. Currently waiting for him to be seen by an educational psychologist before we register him for primary school. It took us 1 & half years to get through whole diagnostic process.
    Thats good to get him seen before he starts school. Will be a great help for when he starts primary and getting the support he needs.
  • hartill77
    hartill77 Member Posts: 97 Courageous
    I have worked as a carer for adults on the autism spectrum, and now work with children on the spectrum. I think everyone is on the spectrum.

    The way it was explained to me when I said that everyone is on the spectrum was that 3 people could be sick but for different reasons
    1. Morning sickness
    2. A bug
    3. A hangover
    so although they experience similar symptoms and can compare its not always because of the same reason. 
    I think we all traits that can put us on the spectrum but they are also part of peoples personality.  
  • hartill77
    hartill77 Member Posts: 97 Courageous
    Ourania said:
    I have a son who will be 3 next month non verbal and we have history of autism in the family. St the moment we are on crszy long waiting lists to see speech therapist etc only support we get is via a programme though the local council. Can't see light at the end here...
    I think because of budget cuts and other reasons there is a massive back log of appointments.  I felt like that when my daughter was 3 and only seemed to be  me that noticed she was not neuro-typical. She was 9 when she got diagnosed. It is long but you will get there and you have afamily history so you have some understanding about autism which is an advantage. 
  • vysvader
    vysvader Member Posts: 133 Courageous
    edited October 2018
    hartill77 said:
    I felt like that when my daughter was 3 and only seemed to be  me that noticed she was not neuro-typical. She was 9 when she got diagnosed. It is long but you will get there and you have afamily history so you have some understanding about autism which is an advantage. 
    That's normal, because within hfASD till 8-9, it's not a rule, but the interest in a social interaction is in many cases the same as for neuro-typical. The more prominent symptoms are recognizable later, around 8.

    I'm not sure that it's always an advantage. In the vast majority of the world with just a few exceptions like the UK, Asperger's syndrome isn't recognized as any condition causing a disability, just a matter of the diversity caused by evolution (also some people are taller/smaller, blonde/red/black haired, etc... there are many diversities and also in cognitive matters like for example, in the average, males socialize, speak, empathize, and cope with the environment less than women but none calls it a disability, it's seen merely as a genetic variant and none minds). There's no support for them, however, if the kids are not labeled as disabled, they're growing more confident, easier socialize, aren't bullied, and later in their lives are simply employable (employers don't discriminate them for their health conditions if don't know about it) comparably to neuro-normal.

    I'm not sure that the blue label is also an advantage for the kids.
    You can feel free to get in touch 
  • hartill77
    hartill77 Member Posts: 97 Courageous
    I agree I thought that once my daughter got her diagnosis she would get Sen support in school.  Even with the report from the OT they didn't follow it unless there was a problem and I was called in. 
    You are right about the lack of support I find autism westmidlands groups a big help to me. 

  • Firefly123
    Firefly123 Member Posts: 525 Pioneering
    My 16 year old daughter 20 year old son and I'm more than certain my 23 year old son has also but his diagnosis is all separate server social phobia server anxiety OCD agoraphobia him and his brother have all the same problems only difference is that at school he was well above while his brother was well below and the time it takes to get a diagnosis is not good at all my daughters process started in her first year of secondary school just got her diagnosed at the beginning of the year so didn't get the proper help she needed and is now in her last year as has no chance of getting the results in her exams to be able to stay on 
    Everything is endless battles to try to get the help they need 

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