PIP, DLA and AA
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What evidence should I send?

DawnWalkerDawnWalker Member Posts: 1 Listener
edited July 2018 in PIP, DLA and AA
I have just received the "book" to complete to transfer to PIP from DLA.  I receive the higher rate mobility and middle rate care allowances which have been granted for an indefinite period.  I am unsure how best to complete the "book" as I have heard that many deserving people are being "kicked off" - any advice would be greatly appreciated i.e. what evidence should I send etc ?

Replies

  • ataloss2018ataloss2018 Member Posts: 48 Courageous
    Any evidence that supports your claim for PIP, so Dr's, Consultant, Physio letters, list of medications and anything else relevant.

     It is also helpful if you get HCP to write a letter saying how your condition effects your everyday life, this is useful because it helps back up your claim that you meet each of the descriptors that you are claiming under.  An example, if you suffer from inconvenience, wear pads, use medication and need to be close to a loo at all times then ask the HP if they will mention this in the letter.   
  • Pippa_AlumniPippa_Alumni Scope alumni Posts: 5,851 Disability Gamechanger
  • littleruthie123littleruthie123 Member Posts: 490 Pioneering
    Hiya try not too worry too much .there are fair assessors .remember it's not so much what your conditions you have .but how it effects you everyday also mention any fluctuations you have through the week .if it's not terrible every day explain the good and bad .goI'd luck .there lots of support around 
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 142 Listener
    I sent in a supporting letter from
    my GP, copies of recent consultations with consultants and my recent medical health evaluation. Anything like that will help, I also had help from a local charity that helped me fill out the form. 
    I got a text from DWP today saying they’d got my form, promptly followed by me having a panic attack and throwing up! I just want it over with, I can’t handle the thought of having a f2f but all my other benefits have been done by paper based so hoping this one will be the same. Good luck. Xx
  • littleruthie123littleruthie123 Member Posts: 490 Pioneering
    It plays havic with our anxiety so understand how you feel .you will get through it unfortunately something we all have too do .have you got someone too write you require a home assessment. They usually ask for this .space might be worth mentioning too your doctor or support worker .and thank you very good luck too you as well 
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 142 Listener
    They written saying a assessment with me traumatic for me, I have BPD and complex PTSD, along with numerous other physical issues and the recent report from my spinal surgeon explains that I have very restricted movement in my neck. Less than 50% achieved without pain, weakness in all my limbs so I’m hoping they have enough to go on without needing to see me. Also explains I suffer from fatigue. Xx 
  • MatildaMatilda Member Posts: 2,616 Disability Gamechanger
    Disability Rights UK has a good guide to claiming PIP including a draft diary that you can adapt.  Good idea to send in a 7 day diary.
  • lucajojo0805lucajojo0805 Member Posts: 1 Listener
    Just wondering how much extra evidence you are supposed to provide for the Tribunal Hearing, in the way of Doctor's letters etc or can you just go with the original stuff that you sent in ?
  • mikehughescqmikehughescq Member Posts: 6,638 Disability Gamechanger
    The key thing with the claim pack is to initially identify which points you ought to score and why. If you don’t know then you need to.

    Then you need to provide two or three detailed anecdotes for each points scoring answer. Saying “I fall a lot” is just an assertion. Giving 3 examples of when you recently fell including where, when, how, why, witnesses, treatment etc. is evidence. 

    Once you’ve done that ask yourself if there are any gaps, Any answers where you don’t have good examples? Then ask yourself what would fill those gaps. It’s unlikely to be medical evidence. A medical professional is unlikely to have ever seen you fall for example. They might be able to add some credibility by repeating what you tell them if they believe it to be true but that’s not medical evidence. That’s just the same as evidence from your next door neighbour. 

    You only really need medical evidence if you lack insight into your condition or if your diagnosis or prognosis is in doubt. One of the biggest misysjes you  an make is to think that medical evidence or more medical evidence wins you entitlement. It does not. 52% of disability benefit claims succeed without any medical evidence. 
  • BenefitsTrainingCoBenefitsTrainingCo Member Posts: 2,692 Pioneering

    DawnWalker,

    As Mike says, identifying what points you should be awarded is a good place to start. Then you know what the form is looking for. You can use the PIP self-test to do this.

    Don't worry too much about evidence, but do think about examples as Mike suggests. Be specific. Remember that if an activity isn't safe, or you can't do it as often as you need to because of pain or fatigue, or you can only do it very very slowly, or you can do it, but not to a reasonable standard, then you should NOT be regarded as able to do that thing. If you can do something, but you need help, explain what help you need and what it allows you to do. 

    The thing about medical evidence is that it's very unusual for most health professionals you deal with to know what you can and can't do in your everyday life. They don't see you at home, trying to dress, cook, wash etc. They don't know how hard these things are. They can confirm you have certain conditions, and that can be helpful. And some doctors' letters are better than others, but it's very variable. So do concentrate on your own lived experience, and do get familiar with the PIP activities - that will really help to make more sense of the PIP2 questionnaire!

    Good luck.

    Will
    The Benefits Training Co:
    Paul Bradley
    Michael Chambers
    Will Hadwen
    Sarah Hayle
    Maria Solomon
    David Stickland
  • YadnadYadnad Posts: 2,856 Member
    The thing about medical evidence is that it's very unusual for most health professionals you deal with to know what you can and can't do in your everyday life. They don't see you at home, trying to dress, cook, wash etc. They don't know how hard these things are. They can confirm you have certain conditions, and that can be helpful. 

    I agree. My GP knows nothing about my life unless it is something that I have told them which to be honest is very little given that too much info generally leads to more tests, more inquisitions and more hospital appointments!

    I like your comment 'it's very unusual for most health professionals you deal with to know what you can and can't do in your everyday life' 

    However when it comes to the Disability Analysts that are employed by the DWP's contractors, they come over as being all seeing and all knowing and after approx. 30 mins or so of talking to you, they can make a report that tells the DWP everything there is to know about how your life is impacted through the diseases, illnesses and disabilities that you suffer from.

    It would solve everything if GP's, Consultants and other health professionals had the same level of insight.

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