PIP, DLA and AA
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Can an Appointee attend the PIP tribunal alone?

AprilApril Member Posts: 98 Courageous
I am an appointee for my daughter who is mentally disabled. She has been refused PIP and we have decided to challenge this. She is very anxious about going to a Tribunal, and I would be happy to attend for her, on my own. Do they actually need to have her there, or can I represent her? Is it preferable for her to attend with me though? Thanks for any advice  :)

Replies

  • wilkowilko Member Posts: 2,200 Disability Gamechanger
    I beleive a Tribunal can be held on your absence but if you daughter is present the Tribunal panel can see how bad and stressed your daughter is. I am sure others will have a comment or opinion to help in your decision. Good luck.
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    The best chance of a decision in your daughters favour is for her to appear in person. This way the Tribunal can see for their self exactly how she is.
    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • YadnadYadnad Member - under moderation Posts: 2,862 Disability Gamechanger
    Isn't this a case of what is best for the daughter?
    If she was my child and knowing how stressed she would become I would be of the opinion that her health and wellbeing takes precedent over anything else. What you are proposing is to parade her before a bunch of strangers hoping that she will become fretful, stressed and anxious so that they can view the position that the father has put her in. Down right cruel if you ask me to suggest that course of action.

     
  • atlas46atlas46 Community champion Posts: 827 Pioneering
    Hi @April

    Done some research.

    Yes you can address the tribunal on behalf of your daughter.

    You will need to write to the tribunal, seeking permission.

    You will need to send a copy of form BF57, which is the certificate issued to you by DWP confirming you Appointeeship.


  • April2018momApril2018mom Member - under moderation Posts: 2,882 Member - under moderation
    Welcome to the community!! 

    Good luck!! You need to write to the tribunal asking them politely for permission to do so. Get a copy of form BF57, fill it out and send it to them. BF57 is basically a certificate that is confirming your appointeeship. Feel free to ask any other questions here. 
  • YadnadYadnad Member - under moderation Posts: 2,862 Disability Gamechanger
    Excellent advice above.

    It causes me to shudder that some posters think it right to upset the child so much.
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    Excuse me..... @Yadnad i never advised anyone to upset the child!!! My advice that to appear in person is better, is correct thank you!

    You don't have to tell me anything about mental health, since i have a 17 year old daughter that suffers with it too and has done for most of her life.  Speaking from experience it isn't always great to keep that child in their own little bubble so to speak either.
    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • YadnadYadnad Member - under moderation Posts: 2,862 Disability Gamechanger
    Excuse me..... @Yadnad i never advised anyone to upset the child!!! My advice that to appear in person is better, is correct thank you!

    You don't have to tell me anything about mental health, since i have a 17 year old daughter that suffers with it too and has done for most of her life.  Speaking from experience it isn't always great to keep that child in their own little bubble so to speak either. 
    I don't agree - I would not want to subject my child to a Tribunal not if it was likely to upset her or cause her undue stress.
    With twin married daughters' aged 38, I still protect them when appropriate from things that may hurt or upset them. They are both still my girls and would do anything to take pain from them.
    Maybe we both have different views on how we look after our offspring?  
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    On this occasion we will have to agree to disagree. I'll do anything to help my children including spending that last 14 years fighting for answers from the medical professionals for my daughter. What i wouldn't do is wrap her in cotton wool because in my eyes, that's just making her MH even worse. I fought for help my daughter and i won, i'm proud of how far i've got and why...because i never ever gave up.
    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • YadnadYadnad Member - under moderation Posts: 2,862 Disability Gamechanger
    edited July 2018
    On this occasion we will have to agree to disagree. I'll do anything to help my children including spending that last 14 years fighting for answers from the medical professionals for my daughter. What i wouldn't do is wrap her in cotton wool because in my eyes, that's just making her MH even worse. I fought for help my daughter and i won, i'm proud of how far i've got and why...because i never ever gave up.
    Agreed, and I have never given up on mine nor will I ever do so in the future. This includes all of my grandchildren one of whom I fought and will continue to fight for his DLA award. They are all too precious.
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