PIP, DLA and AA
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Things I wish I'd known before PIP assessment...

AprilApril Member Posts: 102 Courageous
Just wanted to give some advice to anyone about to go for a PIP Assessment.

1. Take notes during the Assessment.
2. Be aware of the list of predictors that the Assessor uses, and ask them what they are typing.        My daughter told the Assessor that she had travel training (this was just a video at Primary School!), and the Assessor typed that she could travel independently! (she can't!)
This meant that my daughter failed that section of the Assessment. Even though I explained throughout the appeals that it was just a video, the DWP kept repeating that "she had travel training". In my experience, it's impossible to get them to change it afterwards!
3. Make notes about the physical examination. I wish I had. I should have noted down exactly what happened. I should have asked what they were testing and challenged it at the time. It took a matter of minutes, and after that, it was impossible to challenge it, despite the evidence from other professionals. The DWP always prefer their own evidence.

Hope this helps someone. :)

Replies

  • wilkowilko Member Posts: 2,353 Disability Gamechanger
    Thanks April, yes the accessors assumes a lot and records accordingly hence the wrong information being noted and presented to the decision makers. Sometimes it better to give the minimal information so as nothing can be misconstrued.
  • AprilApril Member Posts: 102 Courageous
    Sorry about the typo on my original post...that should have been "descriptors" and not "predictors" :)
  • janekim96Pjanekim96P Member Posts: 44 Courageous
    I  thought you had to be completely honest and upfront at these face to face medicals or assessments?what is bestter telling lies I hope not as that is probably the reason why they are clamping down on so many people who obviously are in need of PiP and those who are trying it on and faking it just for the money those people make my blood boil and mess it up for the real people in need of this help and assistance?
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    @janekim96P of course you tell the truth during any face 2 face assessment. Why would you lie? I'm sure there's very few people that claim these benefits fraudulently. Invisible conditions do exist and you can't possibly judge others nor can you judge a book by it's cover.
    Proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice I have given to members here on the community.
  • MatildaMatilda Member Posts: 2,616 Disability Gamechanger
    Give the DWP an inch and they'll take a yard. Their purpose is to use the slightest excuse to fail people.  If DWP didn't make so many inaccurate decisions then71% of appeals would not succeed.

  • YadnadYadnad Posts: 2,856 Member
    April said:
    Just wanted to give some advice to anyone about to go for a PIP Assessment.

    1. Take notes during the Assessment.
    2. Be aware of the list of predictors that the Assessor uses, and ask them what they are typing.        My daughter told the Assessor that she had travel training (this was just a video at Primary School!), and the Assessor typed that she could travel independently! (she can't!)
    This meant that my daughter failed that section of the Assessment. Even though I explained throughout the appeals that it was just a video, the DWP kept repeating that "she had travel training". In my experience, it's impossible to get them to change it afterwards!
    3. Make notes about the physical examination. I wish I had. I should have noted down exactly what happened. I should have asked what they were testing and challenged it at the time. It took a matter of minutes, and after that, it was impossible to challenge it, despite the evidence from other professionals. The DWP always prefer their own evidence.

    Hope this helps someone. :)
    Are you suggesting that the claimant sits there with a note pad and pen jotting down all of the questions and answers given?
    Only the claimant can raise objections or questions of the assessor that is unless someone else has prior DWP permission.
    The claimant can ask what is being typed but I do doubt that they will be given a answer.
  • AprilApril Member Posts: 102 Courageous
    Yadnad, I am my daughter's appointee, so I am able to assist her in assessments.
    I will be joining her at the Tribunal too.
    Yes, I am suggesting that people take notes during the assessment. If you want to challenge inaccuracies later on, you can only do so if you have a record of what was asked/said. Some people suggest recording it. That might be a better idea for some people. Although notes are better for the physical exam.
    My point is that many Assessors don't understand the nature of certain disabilities and misunderstandings arise. If you don't ask what they are typing, you will never know if they've misunderstood. As soon as they have written that Assessment, you will have great difficulty getting them to change any mistakes. 
    The Assessment seems to be the most important part for the DWP, by the way. More important than Doctors letters, or hospital letters, or your own words. 
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    It's not about them understanding a disability. It's about the claimant giving them as much information about how their conditions affect them as possible. Filling in the form correctly with as much information as possible is the most import thing, not the assessment. During an assessment, there may not be time to give them the information you need to about your condition, which is why filling that form is so important. Conditions affect people in many different ways and you'll never have 2 people the same. There's no need for them to have an understanding about any condition.

    Sending in 200 A4 pieces of evidence won't help anyone if the evidence you sent doesn't prove those descriptors apply to you. Contradictions may also occur in all that evidence sent, Sending in 2 pieces of evidence that proves beyond doubt that those descriptors apply will far outweigh this.
    Proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice I have given to members here on the community.
  • YadnadYadnad Posts: 2,856 Member
    April said:
    Yadnad, I am my daughter's appointee, so I am able to assist her in assessments.
    I will be joining her at the Tribunal too.
    Yes, I am suggesting that people take notes during the assessment. If you want to challenge inaccuracies later on, you can only do so if you have a record of what was asked/said. Some people suggest recording it. That might be a better idea for some people. Although notes are better for the physical exam.
    My point is that many Assessors don't understand the nature of certain disabilities and misunderstandings arise. If you don't ask what they are typing, you will never know if they've misunderstood. As soon as they have written that Assessment, you will have great difficulty getting them to change any mistakes. 
    The Assessment seems to be the most important part for the DWP, by the way. More important than Doctors letters, or hospital letters, or your own words. 
    At the end of the day whatever notes you take are for your use only. It will still be one person's word against the other irrespective of what you write.

  • YadnadYadnad Posts: 2,856 Member
    edited September 2018
    It's not about them understanding a disability. It's about the claimant giving them as much information about how their conditions affect them as possible. Filling in the form correctly with as much information as possible is the most import thing, not the assessment. During an assessment, there may not be time to give them the information you need to about your condition, which is why filling that form is so important. Conditions affect people in many different ways and you'll never have 2 people the same. There's no need for them to have an understanding about any condition.

    Sending in 200 A4 pieces of evidence won't help anyone if the evidence you sent doesn't prove those descriptors apply to you. Contradictions may also occur in all that evidence sent, Sending in 2 pieces of evidence that proves beyond doubt that those descriptors apply will far outweigh this.
    That's the crux of the thing - filing in the PIP2 in such a way that it creates a picture of the difficulties that arise and why.
    Unfortunately, and I keep saying this, it all depends on the ability of the claimant to carry out that action. Not everyone is minded for many reasons to be able to express themselves in the best way. Help and assistance is extremely difficult to find especially good help. 
    What then are we left with? Claimants who are lucky enough to have the ability and claimants that are lucky enough to access good welfare advice and help.
    That leaves the third category in that no matter what they do they will generally always undersell their issues and consequently end up with a poor report, a bad decision and have to put up with the stresses of a Tribunal hearing some 12 months down the line having to suffer a large reduction in their income in the meantime.

    As for gathering evidence, that too in itself can be a major obstacle for that third group of claimants - not knowing/realising what they should be looking for as well understanding where they can access it.

    Sometimes it isn't helpful to always be saying to seek out help from the start of the claim - we all know that it is impossible to access in many areas of this country.
  • AprilApril Member Posts: 102 Courageous
    @poppy123456 I think the original form is probably important for some disabilities, but sadly not for things like autism and other learning disabilities.
      If the Assessor lacks knowledge about learning difficulties, for instance, they will ignore the original form and type that they don't have any problems.
    In those cases, the forms and the medical evidence are treated as worthless by the DWP.
    That's why it's important to ensure that the Assessor understands the disability. Don't assume that they will. My daughter's Assessor was only a Nurse, and she didn't have a clue. 
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    It's important for all disabilities. ASD and learning disabilities still affect people in totally different ways. I know this because my daughter has both, as well as a social anxiety disorder. No 2 people are the same.
    Proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice I have given to members here on the community.
  • YadnadYadnad Posts: 2,856 Member
    April said:
    @poppy123456 I think the original form is probably important for some disabilities, but sadly not for things like autism and other learning disabilities.
      If the Assessor lacks knowledge about learning difficulties, for instance, they will ignore the original form and type that they don't have any problems.
    In those cases, the forms and the medical evidence are treated as worthless by the DWP.
    That's why it's important to ensure that the Assessor understands the disability. Don't assume that they will. My daughter's Assessor was only a Nurse, and she didn't have a clue. 
    At my third and last assessment, totally exasperated with the comments that were made on the previous two reports, I asked a simple question if the assessor (a young  nurse) if she had any clue what the effects are and what difficulties she would expect me to have with Chronic Pancreatitis. She told me that she had never met anybody with that problem and knew nothing about it, but that does not mean..... 
    There you go I could have told her that I go round eating frogs at night for supper for all that she knew.
  • AprilApril Member Posts: 102 Courageous
    It's important for all disabilities. ASD and learning disabilities still affect people in totally different ways. I know this because my daughter has both, as well as a social anxiety disorder. No 2 people are the same.
    You're right, Poppy, but the DWP may still ignore your original form if it disagrees with the Assessment. This was my experience, and what I hear from so many other people.
    That's why I wanted to tell people that the Assessment is the most important part. The DWP, as I understand it (and certainly in my daughter's case) go with the Assessment. 

    I thought the DWP would read my original form and the medical notes, and give more weight to those. They didn't. They chose to believe a Nurse who had no knowledge or understanding of my daughter's rare disability. 
    So my advice is to make sure that the Assessor understands everything about the disability. What the Assessor types is the most important part, in my experience.

    I actually asked the DWP why they chose to believe the Assessor above the medical evidence. They replied that the Assessor had been given training in disabilities! I wonder how much training they are given though. And how can it be as good as someone who has expertise in the condition?
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    The decision maker mostly goes with the report, it's rare to go against it. This is why the report is written. The reason it's important to put as much information down on the form is because during the assessment there may not be enough of time to answer all the questions with as much detail as possible. If the forms are filled out correctly with all the details about how your conditions affect you then they will already have the  information. The assessment will just be to go over a few things, which is what it's meant to be for. So, on this occasion we'll have to agree to disagree. If you're going through a MR/Tribunal good luck and i hope you get the decision that's right for your daughter.
    Proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice I have given to members here on the community.
  • YadnadYadnad Posts: 2,856 Member
    edited September 2018
    The decision maker mostly goes with the report, it's rare to go against it. This is why the report is written. The reason it's important to put as much information down on the form is because during the assessment there may not be enough of time to answer all the questions with as much detail as possible. If the forms are filled out correctly with all the details about how your conditions affect you then they will already have the  information. The assessment will just be to go over a few things, which is what it's meant to be for. So, on this occasion we'll have to agree to disagree. If you're going through a MR/Tribunal good luck and i hope you get the decision that's right for your daughter.
    It does seem in the case of many that have this assessment that no matter what you put on the form or what evidence you send in, if the assessor doesn't believe what you have written down and goes against it, the DWP will almost always go with the assessor and not the form or the evidence.

    If for example you claim to not be able to walk more than 20 metres - you give the reason backed up with medical evidence and you explain in detail what happens if you try to walk beyond this level - if the assessor thinks that you are exaggerating your difficulties then that is what the DWP will accept.

    I've been there myself with evidence of why I have that difficulty, the proof being an assessment in hospital on a walking machine undertaken by the spinal unit. Then explained what happens if I try to exceed my limit.
    The assessor disagreed and said that I can walk more than 200metres with no difficulties.
    I did tell the assessor at my third assessment at the start that she might as well not bother wasting my time and her's as what I have written and the evidence I have produced will be ignored and she will write something totally different in the report as per usual. So to cut the **** can we now conclude?
  • chrisvanfchrisvanf Member Posts: 64 Courageous
    2 Tips for the PIP assessment.

    Read what the assessor has typed, it;s states in the book that you can read what the assessor is/has typed.
     
    Record the assessment, you must provide the equipment.

    Edited, re-edited, bits added, bits taken out spellchecked then edited again, 
  • AprilApril Member Posts: 102 Courageous
    The decision maker mostly goes with the report, it's rare to go against it. This is why the report is written. The reason it's important to put as much information down on the form is because during the assessment there may not be enough of time to answer all the questions with as much detail as possible. If the forms are filled out correctly with all the details about how your conditions affect you then they will already have the  information. The assessment will just be to go over a few things, which is what it's meant to be for. So, on this occasion we'll have to agree to disagree. If you're going through a MR/Tribunal good luck and i hope you get the decision that's right for your daughter.
    Thanks for the good luck wishes. My daughter is just waiting for a date for the Tribunal. She's very anxious about it, so I'm trying to prepare her.The awful thing is that it will concentrate on all the things she can't do, and that is very bad for her self esteem. She's a teenager and very young for her age too, and she wants to be like everyone else. This system is very tough for young people. That's another thing I wish I'd known at the Assessment...you have to be very frank about difficulties. And that may leave your child feeling dreadful, but there's no way round it.
  • AprilApril Member Posts: 102 Courageous
    Yadnad said:
    The decision maker mostly goes with the report, it's rare to go against it. This is why the report is written. The reason it's important to put as much information down on the form is because during the assessment there may not be enough of time to answer all the questions with as much detail as possible. If the forms are filled out correctly with all the details about how your conditions affect you then they will already have the  information. The assessment will just be to go over a few things, which is what it's meant to be for. So, on this occasion we'll have to agree to disagree. If you're going through a MR/Tribunal good luck and i hope you get the decision that's right for your daughter.
    It does seem in the case of many that have this assessment that no matter what you put on the form or what evidence you send in, if the assessor doesn't believe what you have written down and goes against it, the DWP will almost always go with the assessor and not the form or the evidence.

    If for example you claim to not be able to walk more than 20 metres - you give the reason backed up with medical evidence and you explain in detail what happens if you try to walk beyond this level - if the assessor thinks that you are exaggerating your difficulties then that is what the DWP will accept.

    I've been there myself with evidence of why I have that difficulty, the proof being an assessment in hospital on a walking machine undertaken by the spinal unit. Then explained what happens if I try to exceed my limit.
    The assessor disagreed and said that I can walk more than 200metres with no difficulties.
    I did tell the assessor at my third assessment at the start that she might as well not bother wasting my time and her's as what I have written and the evidence I have produced will be ignored and she will write something totally different in the report as per usual. So to cut the **** can we now conclude?
    I hope you're going to Tribunal with your case. It sounds like you have a very good case, and they are more likely to believe the medical evidence. Good luck!
  • YadnadYadnad Posts: 2,856 Member
    chrisvanf said:
    2 Tips for the PIP assessment.

    Read what the assessor has typed, it;s states in the book that you can read what the assessor is/has typed.
     
    Record the assessment, you must provide the equipment.

    I'm sorry but you will find it almost impossible to get the assessor to allow you to see what they have typed. I know what the guidance says but (the assessor or the DWP) very rarely if ever actually follows it.
    I presume the assessor would argue that for safety reasons they would refuse you access just in case you object strongly to what has been typed.
  • YadnadYadnad Posts: 2,856 Member
    April said:
    Yadnad said:
     
    It does seem in the case of many that have this assessment that no matter what you put on the form or what evidence you send in, if the assessor doesn't believe what you have written down and goes against it, the DWP will almost always go with the assessor and not the form or the evidence.

    If for example you claim to not be able to walk more than 20 metres - you give the reason backed up with medical evidence and you explain in detail what happens if you try to walk beyond this level - if the assessor thinks that you are exaggerating your difficulties then that is what the DWP will accept.

    I've been there myself with evidence of why I have that difficulty, the proof being an assessment in hospital on a walking machine undertaken by the spinal unit. Then explained what happens if I try to exceed my limit.
    The assessor disagreed and said that I can walk more than 200metres with no difficulties.
    I did tell the assessor at my third assessment at the start that she might as well not bother wasting my time and her's as what I have written and the evidence I have produced will be ignored and she will write something totally different in the report as per usual. So to cut the **** can we now conclude?
    I hope you're going to Tribunal with your case. It sounds like you have a very good case, and they are more likely to believe the medical evidence. Good luck!
    I would if I could just as long as I had a good representative to advise me. Getting such quality help is almost impossible in my area, hence why I only went as far as a MR and didn't progress it to appeal. On my own I don't have the capabilities of doing a proper job and as the stress of it would affect my health I just couldn't face the prospect. 
  • mikehughescqmikehughescq Member Posts: 6,569 Disability Gamechanger
    Sigh. 

    You can only ask to read what the assessor has written when you make your statement of a typical day etc. You’ve no right to see the rest of what they select on the day at all.

    Whilst HCPs are given a copy of the claim pack electronically they’re under no obligation to read or menorise every aspect. For them it’s basic background. They are there solely to draw their own conclusions based on the face to face. Only the subsequent decision maker has to read and weigh all the evidence. 

    The PIP 1 and 2 are critical for all conditions but again we’re hearing on this thread about peoope writing about symptoms and putting in medical evidence. Neither are especially useful in most cases. What DWP need on the claim pack are 2 or 3 real world detailed practical examples per activity. If you do that then the face to face is far easier to overcome and often irrelevant.
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 90 Listener
    i had the idea the way to gain pip was to use evidence but failed now i sat watching this site and mike hughes comments time after time and thought nope  then failed again  but turns out he was spot on all the proof in the world be it docs or tapeing or writeing everything down in face to face means nothing unless you exsplainn not about the illness but how you are affected  strange i know but true
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 90 Listener
    edited October 2018
    when i had last one i was asked to stand up i did he noticed i swayed i did not i am used to it?
     he noted my breathing i did not he noted my legs swollen and i had thought loss i did not he noted i could clean myself cos i said yes i could ???lieing cos embarressed he noted nope needed acestance because of instability standing sittin

  • WaylayWaylay Member Posts: 949 Pioneering
    @mikehughescq DWP guidance states that the assessor and the DM(s) will look at all the evidence.
  • WaylayWaylay Member Posts: 949 Pioneering
    I think that we should be seen by assessors who have some experience with our disabilities. I say this because I've had the experience that many of them know nothing about chronic pain, and therefore assume that it's just pain that lasts a long time. They seem to have no idea that it's a syndrome involving malfunction of the central nervous system, which causes neurological, endocrine, immune and cognitive problems. Because of this, they don't even ask questions about these things, and when I've tried to bring them up, only 1 of my 6 assessors actually believed me (a physiotherapist). In one assessment I had the assessor actually roll his eyes when I stated that I have bad short-term memory and "brain fog" due to my chronic pain. Those are bpth very common symptoms! He didn't even write it down. If they don't know anything about your condition, they often ignore things or disbelieve things that are important.

    Another example: Many assessors appear to believe that OCD involves obsessive hand-washing. It does, for some people, but many others have completely different issues/rituals. A friend didn't receive PIP because she said that she needed prompting to bathe (she also has severe depression). The report says something like, "States has problems with bathing, but has OCD!!!" Sigh.
  • mikehughescqmikehughescq Member Posts: 6,569 Disability Gamechanger
    The argument has been made before but it doesn’t really stand too much analysis. DLA used medical assessors and the outcome wasn’t really any better than PIP. The only medical person with a wide knowledge is a GP and their knowledge is too general. What then? Employ specialists? That doesn’t work for multiple reasons.

    Firstly, the cost would go through the roof.

    Secondly, many specialists actively disagree with the diagnosis of the thing in which they major. That won’t go well for CFS, IBS etc.

    Thirdly, most people have multiple conditions. So, which specialist then? Better still what if your specialist is indeed that but believes your other conditions are over-stated etc? 
  • YadnadYadnad Posts: 2,856 Member
    edited October 2018
    Must agree with you Mike over that.
    But even with the system as it is where the impact is measured and not the condition, assessors are about as useful as a chocolate teapot when trying to assess that impact.
    It seems to me that they just take what they see in front of them as representing the full picture and don't appear to consider the wider scenario of variability.
    Then you have a claimant that is so consumed with adapting his/her life to the impact that they come over to the assessor as applicants who are overstating their difficulties.

    Put it simply, even accepting the assessors role in PIP, they woefully fall short in getting to the bottom line of why the claimant is in front of them.

    Either they should be given more training in investigatory analysis and/or more time in carrying out such roles - 2 hours would be a minimum.

    I say that because I had a full assessment carried out by an appointed person at my local university to establish if and how my health issues were impinging on my ability to continue to carry out my duties within the Civil Service. That investigation took well over 2 hours to complete which resulted in a well written and totally correct report. I would add that that same report some months later was dismissed by ATOS when conducting an assessment as to my entitlement to ESA. 
  • mikehughescqmikehughescq Member Posts: 6,569 Disability Gamechanger
    I have to say that the problem starts with the questions on the claim pack and the poor quality of explanatory information which goes with it. There is, in my view, active discouragement to explain your issues properly.

    Equally though there is an understandable culture of mistrust of DWP so people hold back exactly at the point they have the opportunity to explain.
  • YadnadYadnad Posts: 2,856 Member
    edited October 2018
    I have to say that the problem starts with the questions on the claim pack and the poor quality of explanatory information which goes with it. There is, in my view, active discouragement to explain your issues properly.

    Equally though there is an understandable culture of mistrust of DWP so people hold back exactly at the point they have the opportunity to explain.
    As for your first paragraph, I do agree entirely. When a claimant, like myself, is faced with the PIP2 and the attached notes it still leaves them thinking - 'I don't understand that lot'. And not being able to access independent help they are left struggling to write on the form what they think they should write and not what they must write.
    Even now the PIP2 is still a bewildering document.

    Your second paragraph makes me smile. The DWP is the only government department that I mistrust to the nth degree. Past experiences of their inability to give accurate advice, failure to write letters in a sensible and coherent manner, failure to understand that people in general can't understand the complexities of the Welfare system and the inability to communicate with claimants in a pleasant and helpful way. Whether this has anything to do with the general quality of their staff I don't know. I would assume that the civil servants that want to forge a career still avoid working for that department. Even as far back as the mid 60's any civil servant with half a brain would turn down a promotion if it meant having to go to the DWP.(NAB/MPNI/DHSS).

    I would go as far as to say that good evidence is kept back from the DWP as it is commonly believed that there is no point in sending it in as it will simply be ignored - much better to hang on to it for the Tribunal.

  • mikehughescqmikehughescq Member Posts: 6,569 Disability Gamechanger
    I sort of disagree although we clearly have common ground. There are some top staff at DWP but their management has been wholly politicised and a lot of full-time, permanent staff have been stripped out. It’s a heady mix.

    I think the danger is that people, understandably but wrongly, leap from getting a decision they disagree with to an assumption that the only way the decision could come out that way is if specific documents have been ignored. I’ve yet to come across an occasion where I’ve seen evidence of that. The actual issue is that almost nothing will move DMs from the notion that they must prefer the evidence of the HCP because they’re trained to do exactly that. 

    Allied to that is the still remaining stigma of means-testing which has travellled down the decades breeding distrust amongst entire generations via word of mouth. That can’t be under-estimated.
  • YadnadYadnad Posts: 2,856 Member
    edited October 2018
    Allied to that is the still remaining stigma of means-testing which has travellled down the decades breeding distrust amongst entire generations via word of mouth. That can’t be under-estimated.
    I remember the old National Assistance Board and what claimants were expected to do to claim it.
    The Officer had to visit the home, more often than not just a room or two in a house with 2/3 families also living in the same property, to assess the value of their prized possessions that had to be sold before being given a handout. Some had their furniture removed if it was felt to be excessive. The basics you were left with was a bed, personal clothing (restricted in quantity and quality) tools of your trade if you had one, a small table and a couple of chairs. Radios, record players and TV's were classified as luxury goods that had to go.

    I wonder how people today would cope if that same system was employed for all means tested benefit claims - JSA, ESA, GPC & UC?

    It's no wonder people hated having to claim. and the indignity of it all. 
    The best, and this is probably were the mistrust emanated from, was the thought of neighbours watching it all happen.
  • chrisvanfchrisvanf Member Posts: 64 Courageous
    @mikehughescq

    When the Tribunal look at the evidence of your case, do they look at the evidence you sent in when you first applied and then any info for MR, or do they also look at any further info you have sent them in between the MR decision and the Tribunal hearing.
    If they look at all the evidence given at initial application as well as after MR would that not look as though the DWP could not come to a correct decision in the first place as the DWP did not have all the information available. Or is there something I'm missing..Thanks   
    Edited, re-edited, bits added, bits taken out spellchecked then edited again, 
  • mikehughescqmikehughescq Member Posts: 6,569 Disability Gamechanger
    A tribunal looks at all the evidence held by DWP at whatever stage and whatever else you wish to submit. A tribunal are not generally interested in attributing blame for a decision. They only seek to weigh the evidence; ,and findings of fact and then apply the law to those facts.
  • chrisvanfchrisvanf Member Posts: 64 Courageous
    @mikehughescq.
    Thanks for that.
    I have just started down the road of appealing my ESA/UC assessment decision and have just received some new information from counsellors about my conditions.
    I have sent it into the Courts and they have sent it to DWP.

    I was awarded my Blue Badge.just after I sent the appeal docs off to the Courts, I know it has different criteria than (C)ESA/UC but would it help or would it nor be considered by the courts due to having different reasons for acceptance.
    Thanks  
    Edited, re-edited, bits added, bits taken out spellchecked then edited again, 
  • mikehughescqmikehughescq Member Posts: 6,569 Disability Gamechanger
    It adds to the picture and would not be detrimental. However, it’s only truly useful if it refers specifically to the period around the date of claim.
  • chrisvanfchrisvanf Member Posts: 64 Courageous
    @mikehughescq.
    Thanks for that.
    I will send it in as there was only 9 weeks between assessments.
    Thanks for the info.   
    Edited, re-edited, bits added, bits taken out spellchecked then edited again, 
  • mikehughescqmikehughescq Member Posts: 6,569 Disability Gamechanger
    My pleasure and thank you for being so polite.
  • fluffy84fluffy84 Member Posts: 18 Connected
    I would love to hear how you got on at tribunal and I would urge you and anyone else to attend a tribunal. 

    I recently represented my sister-in-law at a PIP tribunal after a 10month wait. We won and she is waiting for her 10 month back payment. 

    The whole process was long and stressful and I am devastated that this is happening to many other disabled people. The DWP are not only letting disabled people down, but they are actively making them worse in my experience. 

    I would advise you to send the courts as much evidence as possible prior to your tribunal. We included medical evidence (Physio reports, GP reports etc) as well as personal statements from people close to the claimant. Details about other benefits, blue badge etc is also helpful. 

    Don't get me started on the terrible assessment process and the behaviour of many of the assessors. It is an outright disgrace. 

    I am reporting the assessor involved in our case to the Nursing Midwifery Council. 
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