PIP, DLA and AA
If this is your first visit, check out the community guide. You will have to Join us or Sign in before you can post.

Mobility

Trengarnuq1Trengarnuq1 Member Posts: 18 Listener
edited October 2018 in PIP, DLA and AA
I got high care and no mobility as they said i walked from taxi to there door so i did not need the scooter went to c a b with mandatory and told me i need medical evedence before they could take to tribunal been unable to get it got the money for  personal care which i now use and will have pay to get new scooter to get around as had them for 20 years this was about two or three months ago

Replies

  • YadnadYadnad Posts: 2,856 Member
    edited October 2018
    I got high care and no mobility as they said i walked from taxi to there door so i did not need the scooter went to c a b with mandatory and told me i need medical evedence before they could take to tribunal been unable to get it 

    To be honest I am in the same boat. What does medical evidence supporting the inability to walk a certain number of metres look like?

    My evidence, now thrown out by the DWP as being 6 years old and no longer relevant or reliable came from the consultant at the spinal unit who tested me in hospital on one of their walking machines, 
    The result was that I fell off twice after 10/15 metres.

    Should I go back and ask to be tested again which I cannot see happen as my mobility has not improved as well as wasting valuable NHS time?

  • Sam_AlumniSam_Alumni Scope alumni Posts: 7,729 Disability Gamechanger
    Hi @Trengarnuq1

    The advice on the CAB website says:

    You need to give specific reasons why you disagree with the decision. Use your decision letter, statement of reasons and medical assessment report to make a note of each of the statements you disagree with and why. Give facts, examples and medical evidence (if available) to support what you’re saying.

    Example based on mobility problems
    I don’t think you have adequately assessed the extent of my mobility problems. You say I can walk 50 metres unaided. In reality, doing this causes me significant pain and would mean I can’t walk for the rest of the day. I have enclosed a letter from my physiotherapist which explains this in more detail.

    When the assessor decides which descriptor applies to you, they must consider whether you can carry out the activity reliably. This means:
    • safely in a way that is unlikely to cause harm either to you or anyone else, either during the activity or afterwards
    • to an acceptable standard
    • repeatedly as often as is reasonably required
    • in a reasonable time period - should take you no more than twice as long someone without your condition
    Scope
    Senior online community officer
Sign in or join us to comment.