PIP, DLA and AA
If this is your first visit, check out the community guide. You will have to Join us or Sign in before you can post.
Receiving too many notifications? Adjust your notification settings.

Help completing the PIP Review Form

sheZZasheZZa Member Posts: 232 Pioneering
At the beginning of January a lady came to my house to help me fill in my PIP review Form as I was finding it very difficult to complete by myself. I’d tried and made a right mess if it. My mood had dipped severely low, so much so that I am now under mental health services again, I suffer with depression and Bi Polar and a few other chronic medical ailments. The lady just copied from the form I’d already completed but thought was wrong, and before she  left I signed and dated the form without reading it. She never read it back to me either. I’ve been beating myself up ever since for being so stupid. It’s constantly on my mind and am very stressed and very worried. I phoned the DWP and asked for them to send me a copy of the form and at the same time I also informed them that I hadn’t read it and it hadn’t been read back to me. Today I received a copy of the review form that she had completed and am quite surprised. She has copied what I had written only worded it better. She has also omitted a few things I’d written but maybe I shouldn’t have included anyway. But I do feel a little more settled now. I saw my gp last week and we had discussed this situation. She said that I lacked mental capacity to sign anything. I saw her again today and she brought up the subject of the PIP Review again and she said I’m ‘not to worry as I’m not fit for work and she/they would fight for me if needed.’ By that I’m assuming she meant herself and my consultants and psychiatrist. She seemed quite cross about the situation with the DWP. I do feel reassured by her and am starting to relax a little. I am now, once again, attending a bi polar support group so hopefully onwards and upwards and I will soon be mentally stronger to fight the good fight if I have to. 

Replies

  • Pippa_ScopePippa_Scope Member Posts: 5,856 Disability Gamechanger
    Thank you for sharing this, @sheZZa!
  • YadnadYadnad Member - under moderation Posts: 2,862 Disability Gamechanger
    sheZZa said:
    But I do feel a little more settled now. I saw my gp last week and we had discussed this situation. She said that I lacked mental capacity to sign anything.
    Really?

    Could I ask what action has been taken to protect you given that the GP has confirmed that you do not have the capacity to sign anything?

    That situation appears quite serious and Power of Attorney should be in place. 
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    Agreed. An assessment is needed before confirmation can be given that a person lacks mental capacity, if this hasn't been done then the GP is wrong to tell their patient that they lack mental capacity. https://www.medicalprotection.org/uk/articles/assessing-capacity

    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • sheZZasheZZa Member Posts: 232 Pioneering
    I understand what you’re all saying and it’s got me thinking.  The only thing I can think she meant was at that time I lacked mental capacity which I did as I would never have put myself into that situation. I’m more than capable of filling out a form usually. My mental health was dangerously low and I would have agreed to anything. It is slightly improved at the moment and I am sure it will continue to do so. I am quite an intelligent person who had a good job and used to complete forms for others who needed support for whatever reason. I just couldn’t do it myself then due to my mental illness but I will ask her when I next see her xx
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    You can't say you lack mental capacity if you haven't been assessed as having this.

    Someone lacking capacity - because of an illness or disability such as a mental health problem, dementia or a learning disability - cannot do one or more of the following four things:

    • Understand information given to them about a particular decision
    • Retain that information long enough to be able to make the decision
    • Weigh up the information available to make the decision
    • Communicate their decision.

    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • sheZZasheZZa Member Posts: 232 Pioneering
  • April2018momApril2018mom Member - under moderation Posts: 2,882 Member - under moderation
    I disagree respectfully. The rules of the mental capacity act are really hard to understand but the important thing to understand is that capacity is never set in stone. I’ve been told that neither DS or DD lack capacity when I have asked about it. What makes her think that? 
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    ilovecats said:
    I disagree respectfully. The rules of the mental capacity act are really hard to understand but the important thing to understand is that capacity is never set in stone. I’ve been told that neither DS or DD lack capacity when I have asked about it. What makes her think that? 
    DS?DD?
    Otherwise known as dear daughter and dear son.
    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
Sign in or join us to comment.