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Pip Assessment finally

thedocthedoc Member Posts: 51 Connected
edited May 2019 in PIP, DLA and AA
Finally had my assessment date for pip claim of capita and it's a home visit rather apprehensive though because its my first claim. Any information on what it will be like would be greatfully received thanks 

Replies

  • Antonia_ScopeAntonia_Scope Member Posts: 1,783 Pioneering
    Welcome to the community @thedoc how are you doing today? Glad to hear you have a date now for your assessment. A lot of our members can relate to this feeling, so please do not feel alone in this. There's some information on PIP assessments from the Citizen Advice website. Please let us know if you have any questions :)
  • thedocthedoc Member Posts: 51 Connected
    Thanks for the welcome and the advice 
  • KEEKEE Member Posts: 84 Courageous
    Hello, I made my first claim for PIP in March 2019 and had my home assessment on the 9th May 2019. 
    The lady assessor was lovely and polite and seemed to truly be listening and understanding of my illnesses. She made notes constantly and asked me to copy some movements but I didn’t have too if too uncomfortable, which I couldn’t on the the two out of three that she asked me to do. 
    My assessment went on for 1hr 15mins but it did feel quicker.
    At the end the assessor made some light convo regarding my little dogs who were in another room (she could hear them yapping) she even mentioned the breed of her dogs. 
    I was frightened massively prior to the assessment and now my anxieties are about the decision. 
    But the assessor was very professional and came from Capita.
    Hope this helps a little.

  • thedocthedoc Member Posts: 51 Connected
    Thank you very much KEE for those kind words i also have 2 dogs so i hope he/she likes dogs as well they are a jack Russell and a jug 
  • KEEKEE Member Posts: 84 Courageous
    Your welcome.

    Dogs are so therapeutic and you have 2 lovely breeds there. My two are Jack Russel x Yorkshire terrier and Chihuahua x Pomeranian.

    Good luck with the assessment and update to let us know how it goes for you.


  • Chloe_ScopeChloe_Scope Scope Posts: 10,662 Disability Gamechanger
    Very best of luck with your claim!
    Community Partner
    Scope

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  • thedocthedoc Member Posts: 51 Connected
    Thank you chloe x
  • thedocthedoc Member Posts: 51 Connected
    Info required plz
    When i have my home assessment next week would i be allowed to read off my copy of the form i sent to DWP only my memory isn't the best 

  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0 Listener
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    HI,

    There's no reason why you can't but the whole purpose of the assessment is to get more information about how your conditions affect you because they don't have enough to do the paper based assessment.
    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • cristobalcristobal Member Posts: 965 Disability Gamechanger
    @thedoc - i had my assessment at home and as well as my application form I'd made some notes for each of the descriptors so that I would have something to refer to and to remind me of things that I wanted to raise.I included some extra examples to support what I was saying and I kept a diary for the previous week.

    I'd recommend using a diary as it will help you to answer questions such as "when did you last do 'x'", and "how often do you do 'y'" If I hadn't have kept one my answers wouldn't have been much more than a guess because my memory isn't good!

  • thedocthedoc Member Posts: 51 Connected
    Thank you cristobal I will do that much appreciated 
  • twonkertwonker Member - under moderation Posts: 617 Pioneering
    cristobal said:
    @thedoc - i had my assessment at home and as well as my application form I'd made some notes for each of the descriptors so that I would have something to refer to and to remind me of things that I wanted to raise.I included some extra examples to support what I was saying and I kept a diary for the previous week.

    I'd recommend using a diary as it will help you to answer questions such as "when did you last do 'x'", and "how often do you do 'y'" If I hadn't have kept one my answers wouldn't have been much more than a guess because my memory isn't good!

    Did the assessor agree with you using those documents? I have always understood the assessment to be one where the assessor wants to test the statements put on the claim form. That can only be done if what you say agrees with what you wrote months ago without referring to the answers.
    Maybe I am wrong and have approached my assessments in the wrong way. I too have memory issues evidenced by the various mental health professionals. Due to these issues most of my answers were either 'don't know or can't remember', or whatever came into my head when asked the questions. Whether anything agreed with the claim form I have no idea as the report made no sense of anything. So the claim went to appeal. 
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    There's no reason at all why you can't make notes to take into the assessment with you. Those that advise otherwise are just being ridiculous.
    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • thedocthedoc Member Posts: 51 Connected
    I'm rather confused now lol 
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    Not everyone is able to remember everything, so yes make notes to take with you. I'm not saying there will be time to look at them but there's certainly no harm in taking them. Some do, some don't. I have never taken any notes or the form with me, i always prefer to answer the questions as they come. This is because you really don't know what questions they will ask, how they will ask them so referring to notes for me would just confuse my brain even more.
    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • cristobalcristobal Member Posts: 965 Disability Gamechanger
    edited May 2019
    @twonker ..As you say you're probably are wrong I think. As far as I know the assessment isn't supposed to be a test to catch claimants out, nor a memory test. In my case such a strategy wouldn't work anyway because if I didn't refer to notes to help me most of my replies would be "I can't remember" and the interview would go nowhere.

    There is also a big advantage for the assessor because they will have more accurate information.

    For example, when I was asked how often I suffered fatigue and couldn't cook, wash etc I could count up and say "x times in the last week". When was the last time? "Friday last" I couldn't give these answers without relying on my notes. 

    @thedoc - You must decide but I stick by my original advice. I think it would be helpful even if just to prompt you of things you want to mention (I covered these at the end in my assessment)

    Good luck anyway, whatever you decide..

  • twonkertwonker Member - under moderation Posts: 617 Pioneering
    Thanks, all of that seems logical and probably I have been doing it all wrong - it was drilled into me through school then uni then through professional exams that crib sheets were a no no!
    One thing that comes to mind is if you made a claim that you could not walk more than 20 metres could the assessor not then ask how did you measure that distance. Could they not also ask how long it took you and how long do you think you could walk? 
    That was a situation I was in last time and I estimated it, no idea how long it took and just guessed at the time I could walk for.
  • cristobalcristobal Member Posts: 965 Disability Gamechanger
    edited May 2019
    @twonker - you're right they could ask that...if I remember (!) I was asked about how far I walked, rather than 'How far can you walk reliably'. 

    In my case, and I've only had one assessment so I don't know whether this is a standard thing, the assessor apparently measured the speed I was able to walk by timing me over a few metres when I had to leave the room. I'm fairly confident this never took place, unless it was just an estimate of the time and the distance i.e. roughly two metres in roughly three seconds....

    In any case the assessor got the 'working out' wrong so it was meaningless..

  • twonkertwonker Member - under moderation Posts: 617 Pioneering
    The reliably factor is not something that the assessor tends to offer. It seems that it is for the claimant to claim it through the answers to the questions asked. I too was never asked anything about reliability - just that you can either do it or not do it. I did try to put that point to the assessor in saying yes to cooking BUT.... and yes to bathing BUT..., but my 'buts' were disregarded as they had already registered my answer and had moved on to the next question.
  • cristobalcristobal Member Posts: 965 Disability Gamechanger
    @twonker - you may be right but I can't really judge as my experience is based on only one assessment.

    I could actually do a lot of the descriptors - what was a problem for most of them was the 'reliability' factor. e.g. I could prepare and cook a very nice meal, as long as I didn't leave the gas on and set the house on fire...

    Winding back to my own assessment, I tried to add 'reliably to each of the questions and then answer "I can't do 'x' reliably' (if this were the case) and then explain why. I found it difficult to do this throughout the assessment but I thought that it was a key part of the process.

    The problem is that I imagine I might have sounded like a barrack room lawyer, or a 'know it all' who had learnt the DWP guidelines!
  • CockneyRebelCockneyRebel Member Posts: 5,258 Disability Gamechanger
    twonker said:
    The reliably factor is not something that the assessor tends to offer. It seems that it is for the claimant to claim it through the answers to the questions asked. I too was never asked anything about reliability - just that you can either do it or not do it. I did try to put that point to the assessor in saying yes to cooking BUT.... and yes to bathing BUT..., but my 'buts' were disregarded as they had already registered my answer and had moved on to the next question.
    Here is the problem that most people have. We are preprogrammed to answer in the positive, When you visit  your GP for example they will often say " How are you today ?" and you reply " I am fine" or similar.
    You need to get used to answering " No, but on some occasions" etc. When you answer yes, the assessor will move on and not hear any explaination you may offer. When you answer No, the assessor then has to listen and  ask further questions to qualify an answer
    Be all you can be, make  every day count. Namaste
  • pcoventrypcoventry Member Posts: 149 Pioneering
    thedoc said:
    Finally had my assessment date for pip claim of capita and it's a home visit rather apprehensive though because its my first claim. Any information on what it will be like would be greatfully received thanks 
    I had one on Monday it's not as bad as you think - they will ask about your worst day - give as much info as possible 
  • Chloe_ScopeChloe_Scope Scope Posts: 10,662 Disability Gamechanger
    Thank you for sharing your experience @pcoventry! Hope it goes well @thedoc and that the advice has helped :) 
    Community Partner
    Scope

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  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    pcoventry said:

    I had one on Monday it's not as bad as you think - they will ask about your worst day - give as much info as possible 
     During an assessment they don't ask about your worst day and you really shouldn't base it on your worst day. PIP is about how you are at least 50% of the time over a 12 month period, it's not about your worst day.

    If you tell them your worst day during an assessment and it's not your worst day, then it's very likely the HCP will see through this and think "if that's their worst day then they can't be as bad as they say they are"

    Always tell them about all of your days, whether they are good or bad.
    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • cristobalcristobal Member Posts: 965 Disability Gamechanger
    @poppy123456 @pcoventry...if I remember correctly other posters have mentioned being asked about their worst day.....

    ...which is strange, because I agree with you that it doesn't seem like a good idea...


  • pcoventrypcoventry Member Posts: 149 Pioneering
    @cristobal I am lucky in that 6 out of 7 days are my worst days - so I was having a bad day when I had my assessment 
  • twonkertwonker Member - under moderation Posts: 617 Pioneering
    twonker said:
    The reliably factor is not something that the assessor tends to offer. It seems that it is for the claimant to claim it through the answers to the questions asked. I too was never asked anything about reliability - just that you can either do it or not do it. I did try to put that point to the assessor in saying yes to cooking BUT.... and yes to bathing BUT..., but my 'buts' were disregarded as they had already registered my answer and had moved on to the next question.
    Here is the problem that most people have. We are preprogrammed to answer in the positive, When you visit  your GP for example they will often say " How are you today ?" and you reply " I am fine" or similar.
    You need to get used to answering " No, but on some occasions" etc. When you answer yes, the assessor will move on and not hear any explaination you may offer. When you answer No, the assessor then has to listen and  ask further questions to qualify an answer
    Not saying that you are right or wrong. Taking the question you have quoted and making it a negative. GP how are you feeling today? Not good at all, but some days are better than others when in fact you are actually having a good day but some days are not as good.

    Surely giving the first answer would be a lie?

     If you start believing in the negative so as to give the answer you suggest most people will end up thinking and believing that life in general is a negative experience. That could cause terrible consequences for those who suffer from various mental health issues.

    All it needs is for the assessor to listen to what is being said without the claimant having to turn everything around so that no is the first thing out of your mouth.
    Personally I don't want to lie or be a negative individual and it is not right that the PIP system tries to make people think negatively.

  • twonkertwonker Member - under moderation Posts: 617 Pioneering
    pcoventry said:

    I had one on Monday it's not as bad as you think - they will ask about your worst day - give as much info as possible 
     During an assessment they don't ask about your worst day and you really shouldn't base it on your worst day. PIP is about how you are at least 50% of the time over a 12 month period, it's not about your worst day.

    If you tell them your worst day during an assessment and it's not your worst day, then it's very likely the HCP will see through this and think "if that's their worst day then they can't be as bad as they say they are"

    Always tell them about all of your days, whether they are good or bad.
    Your post goes against what Cockneyrebel is saying. He says that you should not answer any question with a positive statement such as yes.

    This all sounds a bit confusing to me. Say it as it is is my motto and if appropriate qualify your answer as you are suggesting.
  • Megan27Megan27 Member Posts: 10 Listener
    Totally confusing I've got a home face to face on Wednesday my condition is about safety has I have a very unstable knee and was going to answer the questions around safety
  • CockneyRebelCockneyRebel Member Posts: 5,258 Disability Gamechanger
    Don't be rushed into answering. Listen to what is being asked. Don't say yes to something and then try to qualify having difficulty. Many closed questions lead you into giving yes or no answers, can you complete an activity Safely, Repeatedly, To an acceptable standard, In a reasonable time and for the majority of time
    Be all you can be, make  every day count. Namaste
  • Megan27Megan27 Member Posts: 10 Listener
    Thankyou so do you my say yes or no just give an answer why you can't it's so stressful it's made me more ill
  • CockneyRebelCockneyRebel Member Posts: 5,258 Disability Gamechanger
    You must always answer truthfully, if you have difficulty say so


    Be all you can be, make  every day count. Namaste
  • Megan27Megan27 Member Posts: 10 Listener
    I have a lot of difficulty and will answer truthfully I had lots of evidence as well but some answers are confusing  but I suppose it depends on the day what's asked
  • twonkertwonker Member - under moderation Posts: 617 Pioneering
    You must always answer truthfully, if you have difficulty say so


    There should be no difficulty in telling the truth
  • Megan27Megan27 Member Posts: 10 Listener
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