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Are there stereotypes about having a disability?

Chloe_ScopeChloe_Scope Scope Posts: 10,680 Disability Gamechanger
This week (10th- 16th June) is Diabetes Week 2019 and like most awareness days, a theme has been chosen. This year, #SeeDiabetesDifferently aims to tackle common stereotypes and challenge attitudes around the condition.



As part of this campaign, Diabetes UK release some facts as part of the campaign, with the first one being:
One in 15 of us live with diabetes. That’s 4.7 million people in the UK – more than cancer and dementia combined. That includes one million people who don’t even know they have diabetes.
Chances are, lots of people you know are living with diabetes.

Furthermore, there was an emphasis on this campaign around sharing people's stories and allowing these people to be seen more than the condition that they have. They can be found here if you'd like to give them a read. 

Do you think there are any stereotypes about your disability? What do you believe can be done to change these? Let us know in the comments below!

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Replies

  • AilsAils Community champion Posts: 2,268 Disability Gamechanger
    I have Spina Bifida, but I don't think my disability's stereotype is any greater than any other disability.  I think generally that all disabilities face some kind of stereotype in some shape or form.  For me I have faced people's perceptions that I would not walk, I wouldn't do anything with my life including go out to work, I was daft even applying for university and wouldn't get through it, I would never meet a future partner let alone get married and basically I wouldn't live an independent, fulfilling life.  I hasten to add that all of these thoughts/perceptions haven't just come from total strangers, but from some wider family members also!  :neutral:   Nevertheless, I have managed all of these, not without a struggle at times and with the help of my immediate family/friends, but have progressed along the way and have enjoyed life.  Even although my recent bad health has set me back a bit!

    I think it is up to us to try to push against any kind of stereotype of disabilities and educate people by showing them that we are not defined by our disability, but are valued members of the community who have a lot to contribute to society.  We will struggle a bit in life with various things, but will get there in the end and can live good lives.  I believe that educating others about disability and stereotypes could be done from a young age and it is a really good thing to show children that there are people with disabilities who can do a lot of fulfilling things in life such as play sport, work, drive, get married, have children of their own, etc.  Having worked in child-care and been a Brownie Guider in the past, I would often feel positive knowing that I had answered a child's question about my disability before they could form any kind of stereotype in their head.  

    However, battling against such stereotypes will not be easy, but we can only hope that in time people's views about disabilities will get better.  :smile:




    Winner of the Scope New Volunteer Award 2019.   :)
  • Chloe_ScopeChloe_Scope Scope Posts: 10,680 Disability Gamechanger
    Thank you for this @Ails! That's very true! Every disability will unfortunately have its own set of stereotypes - with no disability necessarily having any more or less. I too have found that kids can be great in this situation! :)
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  • zakbloodzakblood Member Posts: 419 Pioneering
    yes, if your not in a chair, you haven't got a disability, if you can read, write, talk and hold a chat, your fine to the DWP and who care less about anything hidden, no matter how much evidence you have, the more you have, the less they seem to care or even stand, but yes both for sure for anything that doesn't at first look and standout, sorry to be so negative, just the DWP doesn't seem to understand at all, no matter now days who tells them for some people
  • April2018momApril2018mom Member - under moderation Posts: 2,882 Member - under moderation
    My son has SB. Each disability carries a set of stereotypes and myths. As always kids are great examples. And role models. It’s up to us to advocate, to raise awareness and bust myths. As a homeschooling mom I’m used to busting myths. 
  • exdvrexdvr Member Posts: 312 Pioneering
    zakblood said:
    yes, if your not in a chair, you haven't got a disability, if you can read, write, talk and hold a chat, your fine to the DWP and who care less about anything hidden, no matter how much evidence you have, the more you have, the less they seem to care or even stand, but yes both for sure for anything that doesn't at first look and standout, sorry to be so negative, just the DWP doesn't seem to understand at all, no matter now days who tells them for some people

    Good point made about being in a wheelchair so then you're disabled   BUT if you use a mobility scooter you're just a fat lazy bar steward.  I manage to get around the house reasonably well but need the scooter to get around the shops.  It's so obvious that there is hostility almost to the point of aggression towards scooter users.

    Best wishes.

    DLTBGYD

  • Imogen_SteeleImogen_Steele Member Posts: 42 Courageous
    As a person with cerebral palsy, I find that often people assume that I have a low intellect or learning difficulties when actually I have just finished my history degree. I have recently undertaken some public speaking engagements in an attempt to dispel this stereotype, enabling people to become more informed about different types of disability.
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