Housing and independent living
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Homeless

TeddyB22TeddyB22 Member Posts: 156 Courageous
I've been living with my brother for over 4 months now and looking for private accommodation. I'm also on a HE waiting list but they won't consider me for properties with more than one bedroom.
It's at the stage where I can't bare to be in the same room as him. He's unbelievably tight and mean . I give him half my esa money every week and he won't even put heat oil in the tank. There's been no heat or hot water for 4 month . Everything I own in is one room. 
He tells everyone he encounters my business, that I'm mental that I've tried suicide that I'm living rent free off him. I once put him up for 2 years in my house and never once took a single penny off him. 
I have to shower n wash in my mother's house. He's physically attacked me infront of his young son. 
I cannot get a break. Every house viewing I have goes like this : See it, apply, get turned down because they say I can't demonstrate where I can pay the rent. Despite a guarantor, Landlord references and a letter from the HE that I can claim HB they turn me down. I've even considered getting a loan and offering to pay up front 6 months rent but that's not good enough either.
Really can't take much more of it. 
Just needed to rent here. 
Teddy. 

Replies

  • buzzerbuzzer Member Posts: 107 Pioneering
    Hi Teddy,
    It sounds to me like you need more support from mental health services to achieve your objective of getting the HE to prioritise your housing needs.

    https://www.mindingyourhead.info/services 

    Sometimes we need additional support to move forwards,

    Try & be kind to one another even if we may have different views. 

  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    Hi,

    I'm sorry to hear this! I'm assuming it's the privately rented sector you're looking at? If so then yes, it's very difficult out there for those that are claiming benefits. Most landlords will refuse people claiming DSS. There are some areas that may accept, if you have a home owner guarantor but they are often few and far between. You can try shelter to see if they can help you.

    Sometime a local council will have a list of landlords that will accept DSS claimants but the lists are often out of date but you can certainly try.

    When you do eventually find somewhere then unless you're claiming severe disability premium in with your ESA then you won't be able to make a new claiming for housing benefit. It will have to be Universal credit, for help with the rent. Once you claim UC then your ESA will stop and transfer across to UC.

    How much you can claim for help with the rent will depend on your circumstances. If you're under 35 and not claiming daily living PIP then you'll receive the shared housing allowance rate. If you're over 35 then you'll receive the 1 bedroom rate. This link will tell you how much you could claim, depending on area and circumstances. https://lha-direct.voa.gov.uk/


    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • TeddyB22TeddyB22 Member Posts: 156 Courageous
    Thaks alot for the advice. I have claimed HB before. I never had a problem getting somewhere, I really don't know what has changed. 
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    A lot has changed when trying to rent if you're claiming benefits. Some mortgage companies also won't allow landlords to rent to those claiming benefits.

    I'm currently having the same problem and i'm fighting a losing battle right now, despite having a guarantor, 2 months rent in advance and a bond.
    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • TeddyB22TeddyB22 Member Posts: 156 Courageous
    Hi. Poppy. 
    I thought I would update people here of my situation as you were so kind with your advice.
    I have been offered a house near where a friend lives. It's not worth the £500 per month but it is in a good area and it's the only agency that has given me a chance. They want a £500 deposit & £500 up front for rent. It's over my budget and I'll have to be really careful if I do take it.
    I was thinking of some permitted work while I get esa but although they assure me that I can earn up to £125? per week and under 16 hrs and not be penalised I'm not sure if this will effect any housing benefit I receive. I will probably have to apply for Universal Credit but unlike HB it does not allow you to do permitted work which is a shame because it would help me pay my rent. I'm looking at the moment having to pay half my rent my self.
    The house also has solar panels but a friend told me it will not benefit me but only the landlord who stores the energy and then sells it (I really lost track of what he was saying). Either way it is a firm offer. I didn't tell them I was in receipt of ESA or that I would be claiming UC. They asked for a bank statement. I wasn't t lying when I said I'd been in hospital and living with my brother for 5 months while out sick. He asked for my employer and I gave him my old one from about 8 yrs ago. I'm hoping he doesn't ask for paysheets.
    Anyway any advice would be much appreciated and you have all helped me immensely esp Poppy.
    TeddyB. 
  • david235david235 Member Posts: 170 Pioneering
    A lot has changed when trying to rent if you're claiming benefits. Some mortgage companies also won't allow landlords to rent to those claiming benefits.

    I'm sorry to hear that you're in this position, @poppy123456 . As you say, much of the problem is that mortgage lenders often prohibit landlords from renting to those on benefits because they fear the risk of rent and therefore mortgage defaults.

    Another problem is that tenancy dispute and rent guarantee insurers normally exclude lettings to people on benefits. With landlords often having legal costs of thousands of pounds plus perhaps six months of lost rent and reletting costs to find if a letting goes wrong, many are simply unwilling or unable to take that risk, especially as in many areas there are more tenants seeking property than properties available to rent. If landlords have no problem letting to tenants who are not on benefit, it is understandable they will not consider tenants on benefit.


    I have heard suggestions that a refusal to consider renting to tenants on benefit might amount to indirect discrimination on the grounds of disability, gender and/or age. On a first glance, it seems this could be right, as whilst the landlord's policy purports to be solely about financial status, some of the groups protected by the Equality Act 2010 are more likely than the general population to be on means-tested benefits. Certainly disabled people and older people are more likely than the general population to be on means-tested benefits; I cannot remember if women are also more likely to be on means-tested benefits. However, indirect discrimination is lawful if it can be objectively justified. The Local Housing Allowance rule capping Housing Benefit to a third of median rents in the area as well as the rules limiting many claimants under 35 to the shared room rate allow many landlords to claim that their property is unaffordable to most or all on on benefit, which arguably justifies any indirect discrimination. The unavailablility of rent insurance cover and mortgage restrictions on tenants provide further justification for many cases of purported indirect discrimination.


    I fear that the private housing market will become even more troublesome for benefit claimants if the Government abolishes 'no fault' evictions. This would have the effect of making assured shorthold tenancies pretty much open-ended, as a landlord would not be able to seek possession merely because the fixed period had expired and the appropriate notice had been given. Abolishing 'no fault' evictions will also make it substantially more difficult, time-consuming and therefore expensive for landlords to evict problem tenants, meaning landlords will perhaps be even more eager to avoid letting to the poorest in society.
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    Firstly, you can't claim housing benefit because it no longer exists, so you'll need to claim Universal credit to claim the housing element. Once you claim UC then your ESA will stop and transfer across to UC and your ESA award will be honoured in UC.

    The housing element of UC, if you're under 35 then you'll only be entitled to the shared room rate of local housing allowance for your area, unless you claim PIP daily living. If you're over 35 then you'll be entitled to the 1 bedroom rate of local housing allowance. Check here what you'll receive. https://lha-direct.voa.gov.uk/

    To claim the housing element of UC you'll need a tenancy agreement, otherwise you won't be able to claim this.

    Finally, i wouldn't advise you to be dishonest with the agency because it's very likely they will find out because they do their checks. As you gave them your old employers details then i'm assuming you told them that you're working so they will ask for at least 3 payslips. Please be honest because it's better this way. There are landlords out there that will accept DSS tenants but they aren't easy to find. Do some internet searches for your area. Ask your local council if they have a list of landlords that accept DSS.

    You also need to make sure that you have enough money to live off once you pay your rent, living alone isn't cheap because you'll have all the other bills to, such as gas,electric, council tax, TV license etc and water.

    Hope this helps.
    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • david235david235 Member Posts: 170 Pioneering
    TeddyB22 said:
    I didn't tell them I was in receipt of ESA or that I would be claiming UC. They asked for a bank statement. I wasn't t lying when I said I'd been in hospital and living with my brother for 5 months while out sick. He asked for my employer and I gave him my old one from about 8 yrs ago. I'm hoping he doesn't ask for paysheets.

    There is no requirement to tell a landlord or prospective landlord about benefits if they do not ask and there is nothing in the tenancy agreement about benefits.


    Whilst it is understandable that you lied about your employment status in light of your desperation to get housed, the landlord or their agent may well discover your deception by asking for recent payslips, by asking for a reference from the employer and/or by conducting their own checks.

    Perhaps more seriously, stating you are employed by a particular employer when you are not employed by them in an attempt to secure the tenancy seems to me to be a fairly clear cut case of fraud by false representation contrary to section 2 of the Fraud Act 2006. Your statement is dishonest according to the standards of ordinary, reasonable and honest individuals, so is dishonest in a criminal sense (test in Ivey v Genting Casinos [2017] UKSC 67 applied - this case removed the subjective element of the famous Ghosh test for dishonesty in criminal matters). Your statement is untrue and therefore is false. Your statement intends to expose your guarantor, the landlord and/or their insurers to a risk of loss, in that your claim to be employed overstates your financial position and therefore your ability to pay the rent. The offence therefore seems to be clearly made out.


    I know you are desperate to be housed, but a conviction for fraud carries a maximum penalty of an unlimited fine and/or 10 years imprisonment. It is perhaps unlikely that any complaint is made to the police in this scenario, somewhat questionable whether any prosecution is in the public interest and such a fraud is unlikely to result in anything like this maximum penalty upon conviction, but the risk of conviction nevertheless exists. Life could get a lot more complex with a conviction for an offence involving dishonesty, especially when that dishonesty involves housing.

    The ordinary position in contract law is that fraudulent misrepresentation gives the innocent party the right of rescission of contract - that is the right to undo the contract entirely and put the parties back in the positions they were before the contract was entered into. Tenancy agreements are a particular type of contract, with special rules applying to them. There is some authority from the Court of Appeal for the suggestion that fraudulent misrepresentation creates the right of rescission of a tenancy agreement (Killick v Roberts [1991] 4 All ER 289), though it is a risky choice for landlords to attempt to rescind a tenancy agreement when the landlord can evict the tenants on the ground that the tenant knowingly made a false statement to induce the landlord to grant the tenancy (ground 17 in schedule 2 of the Housing Act 1988, read on conjunction with sections 7 and 8 of that Act). This risk of eviction leaves open the possibility of homelessness, which would likely be ruled as intentional homelessness leaving your local authority with no duty to house you.


    I want to step back from what I've just said - I think the chances of lying about being employed going any further than the offer of the tenancy being withdrawn if your lie is discovered are low. However, you are playing with fire by lying and I urge you not to do it. If nothing else, you risk turning the sadly too rare potentially sympathetic landlords and letting agents against you: it is one thing to work with them to find a solution when you are on benefits, but quite another to hide the truth from them in an likely criminal manner.


    I do wish you well with your search for housing; it is clear that your situation is causing you considerable and understandable distress.
  • cristobalcristobal Member Posts: 966 Disability Gamechanger
    I know you are desperate to be housed, but a conviction for fraud carries a maximum penalty of an unlimited fine and/or 10 years imprisonment.

    @david235 - the OP @teddyB22 is seeking help about housing and I do find your post about criminal behaviour unhelpful.

    You may be correct in what you say but mentioning unlimited fines and 10 years imprisonment could cause unnecessary distress to someone seeking help and support.

    I am not at all condoning criminal behaviour but, if there is a criminal offence here, it will certainly not result in imprisonment.


  • Adrian_ScopeAdrian_Scope Testing team Posts: 7,924

    Scope community team

    Hi @TeddyB22, I'm really sorry to read about your predicament. In the past I've also been in the unenviable situation of trying to find privately rented accommodation while on benefits and it isn't easy. I noticed @poppy123456 shared a link for Shelter before, have you managed to get in touch with them?

    Do you know what your LHA rate is? It does sound like the place you've been offered might lead you into financial difficulty if there's a large shortfall for you to meet. Do you currently receive PIP?

    I also wanted to add that although Universal Credit doesn't have 'permitted work' in the same way ESA did, as your ESA award will move over with you, you'll be classed as having limited capacity for work so be entitled to a work allowance. As you'll have rent on your claim your work allowance will be £287, meaning you can earn this amount each month without it affecting your Universal Credit claim, you just need to ensure that any work you do doesn't contradict your reason for claiming ESA/LCW. 
    Senior Community Partner
    Scope

    Your feedback is really important to the development of the online community, so please remember to complete our online community annual survey
  • TeddyB22TeddyB22 Member Posts: 156 Courageous
    Hi. Thanks for all your comments. 
    I've been in touch with someone in the office and told them I am on ESA. They asked if I receive HB and I said no which is true as I'm just living with my brother and paying half his rent nearly. 
    She explained that as long as my bank statement illustrated I had enough money to pay the rent that was what was important. 
    I'm hoping the agent who showed me around won't bring up the inaccuracies in my application. 
    As for the Housing they've done nothing for me. I've had statements from psychologists, doctors, police and a letter from my brother (a lady in the office asked for this) and still they are quite happy for me to be off their hands.
    I'm out of options. Seems grossly unfair that bc Universal Credit has replaced HB that the permitted work amount you can earn is half. I mean what does it mean to the government? You are earning and paying tax.
    Seems this was something that I did not hear any welfare rights people mention. Also I'm hearing horror stories about how long it takes for people to get their UC. I get esa fortnightly and I cannot afford to wait for it. 
    I received some back dated money from the DWP but after I've paid off loans (taken out for deposits n month up front) then I will have to buy furniture as the house is unfurnished. I also have to buy heating oil as there no gas. £500 a month for this dirty house isn't reasonable but I think the landlord who has several houses wants someone in right away as the longer it's empty the more money he loses. It would have been nice had he cleaned the place or put a cooker in it not to mention he can well afford to install gas.
    TeddyB. 
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    Glad to hear you rang and told them.

    Have you put the postcode of the house into the link i gave above to see how much housing element you're entitled to? As advised, if you're under 35 and don't claim PIP or DLA then you'll only receive the shared room rate. If you're over 35 then you'll receive the 1 bedroom rate. Both of these could be well under the £500 per month for the rent and this will leave you will a lot extra to pay each month. Sometimes, it's very easy to let your heart rule your head, so to speak and making decisions quickly like this isn't always the best thing to do. Here's that link again. https://lha-direct.voa.gov.uk/ please do check before deciding for sure whether or not to take the house.

    It takes 5 weeks to receive your first UC payment.

    If they do accept you for the house then when you claim UC you can ask for an advance payment when you attend your first job centre appointment. This advance will need to be repaid back from future UC payments so do take that into consideration as well.

    For furniture then have a look at the free sites on facebook in your area and gumtree. lots of people give furniture away for free.

    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • TeddyB22TeddyB22 Member Posts: 156 Courageous
    Thanks Poppy. 
    I called into the Housing Executive and it seems even with a Descretionary payment which for a single guy won't be any more than £5 a week, I'm looking at £40 per week shortfall. 
    They gave me the usual speil about waiting for an offer. I find out I've been on the waiting list for 2 yrs I'm not being considered for 2 or 3 bed, no ground floor apartments and one of my placement areas don't even have any 1 beds. The other area are hostile to Catholics and another area has had one allocation in 5 yrs. 
    I can't afford to wait for them. 
    TeddyB

  • TeddyB22TeddyB22 Member Posts: 156 Courageous
    Sorry I left my last post unposted. 
    I didn't get the house in the end. They wouldn't even answer the phone. 
    I'm going through the motions. Seen a better one. Got on well with the Agent who told me the house was being used as a a benefit drop. He even admitted the Landlord probably wasn't registered as a Landlord who doesn't pay tax. 
    Anyway I'm waiting on word back. The HE tell me I should have been claiming HB from 6 months ago. That I can get it now but my brother who owns the house isn't registered as a LL and says if I claim HB he will be hit with a massive tax bill. The younger brother who pays him rent would actually be better off renting off someone else who will repair stuff and whatever.
    Apart from this I've a PIP tribunal coming up. My last one was a disaster, I didn't have medical notes (the letter didn't state this was needed) so they sent me home . They also asked me to get in touch with CA who might represent me. I've never had any practical help from Cit Advice. 
    I don't know where to go from here, this is probably my last chance to get it. I need to get 4 yrs of medical notes, they even ask if I can bring evidence of government court cases where they have had decisions overturned. Is that really my job? I'm already overwhelmed? How do I illustrate that I'm crippled with anxiety, that I can't leave the house and I suffer from depression and fear? I'm going to choke in my sleep like what happened 6 months ago? 
    Do I bother going? 
    Once again thanks for listening and your advice is paramount to me. 
    TeddyB. 

  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    edited September 2019
    I'm sorry to hear you didn't get the house. £40 per week shortfall is a lot of money so probably for the best that you didn't get it really. That as well as other bills would have left you with very little money for food.

    The advice you were given that you could have claimed housing benefit 6 months ago is incorrect, i'm afraid. You can't claim for help with any rent when living with member of your close family and a brother is classed as close family.

    It's almost impossible to rent from social housing when you're a single person. There's just not enough of houses available, unfortunately.

    It's extremely difficult also to find a private landlord that will accept those claiming benefits. I've been looking for a privately rented landlord myself for the past several months and it's been the most difficult thing ever. Finally i have found one and now i'm just waiting for the final checks to be done before i know for sure if the house is mine or not. I'll know in the next couple of days. Thankfully i was able to get a guarantor which hugely went in my favour.

    As for your PIP Tribunal. I'm afraid it's your responsibility to send evidence to them to support your claim and not there responsibility to request it. You can request to see your medical records free of charge and you'll receive digital copies of those. Any printed copies they will charge you for. Maybe it's worth requesting those and see what you can use to support your claim.

    It's your decision whether you decide to go ahead but appearing in person will give you the best chance of a decision in your favour. Good luck with everything and i hope you find a suitable home soon.
    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • Adrian_ScopeAdrian_Scope Testing team Posts: 7,924

    Scope community team

    Good luck with all this @TeddyB22 and I'm really sorry you're in such a difficult situation. Did you ever speak to Shelter, did they have any suggestions?
    Senior Community Partner
    Scope

    Your feedback is really important to the development of the online community, so please remember to complete our online community annual survey
  • TeddyB22TeddyB22 Member Posts: 156 Courageous
    Thanks Poppy. I hope you get your new home and are very happy there.
    Adrian, I have a little dog so Shelters were out of the question. 
    I did have high hopes for this new place, got on well with the Agent and he asked me to scan documents to him. However I text him today to see if he received them and got no reply. I know a normal person would have called but I don't like speaking on the phone much to o the annoyance of people around me. Looks like this agency is the same as the rest. Does it take alot of effort to let an applicant know if they have been accepted or not?
    I tried to register with gov.uk to claim a tax rebate but they say they can't identify me. Same with Equifax. Could this be hampering me with my search if I don't exist online? How does that happen? I'm on a voters register, I have a history of previous tenancy and I have my ni number?
    Thanks for replies. 
  • TeddyB22TeddyB22 Member Posts: 156 Courageous
    I also received an offer of Temporary Accommodation from the HE. It's a ground floor flat, I think it's a house split between up n down. It's electric fire heating. (I'm surprised this passed inspection). There area is not great and I am reluctant to have upstairs or downstairs neighbours due to the last year or so and the harassment and bullying.
    I will view it and they say I'm not obliged to take it but it could be my best option so far. 
    Thanks, 
    TeddyB. 
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    Thanks! I'm still waiting to hear back from them but fingers crossed it will be tomorrow.

    Don't be put off by lack of contact from the agents because it can take time to do their checks. So far mine has taken 5 working days and up until yesterday they were still waiting for a reference from a previous landlord and this is the only thing they are waiting for. Checks often take a week, at least. I wouldn't worry about the agency not being able to verify you as a person because the electoral role will do that.

    Online identity is different and it's a complicated process. My identity couldn't be verified online either with equifax but i'm not really bothered.

    Temporary housing is an option but don't be fooled by the word temporary because you could be there a long time. Just some extra advice and i'm not trying to put you off BUT i currently lived in a ground floor flat, a converted house. It's been a flat for many many years and all the properties in my street are the same. I have to admit it's awful, the floors between myself and the person upstairs are very thin, just normal floor boards and no sound proofing or anything. I can hear the person above me blowing his nose, coughing, talking and even snoring. I've lived here for 2.5 years and hate it. It sounds like that temporary house is the same sort of thing. Please do thing carefully before accepting it.
    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • TeddyB22TeddyB22 Member Posts: 156 Courageous
    Thanks again for your reply Poppy. I was thinking the same thing. My last apartment had v thin floorboards and I could hear my neighbour downstairs coughing and snoring but it was nothing compared to what he had to put up with. The creaking, tv, dog jumping about etc. However instead of telling me he put up with it for 1 & 1/2 years and became resentful and violent towards the end. I dunt know what he wanted me to do, hover above the floorboards. I've been back since to get mail and he asked me how I was. I told him that his campaign of Harrassment worked and I was now homeless but I left him with the knowledge that karma will come knock g one day. 
  • david235david235 Member Posts: 170 Pioneering
    I wanted to amplify @poppy123456 's comments about internal noise by saying that even some purpose built flats have internal noise issues, especially older ones. After graduation, my brother bought what is called a Tyneside flat - a sort of terraced maisonette. His property was on the first floor. The downstairs flat was owned by an elderly couple who complained about the slightest noise - even walking across the bedroom floor to go to the bathroom at night. He put in a properly engineered soundproofed floor, but they still made wholly unreasonable complaints about him walking quietly around his flat at night (he couldn't help it - he was a doctor working shifts). Indeed, their broader attitude was that because they owned the downstairs flat that they had the right to impose conditions on the use of his flat and his garden - which, of course, they did not. They wanted him to get his part of the garden into a well kept state - he just wanted to cut the weeds down and leave it as he didn't have the time and energy for gardening after work and ongoing study. In the end, the attitude of this couple was a key part of why he and his wife sold his property when they got married and kept hers.

    My brother's situation was undoubtedly an extreme case. Most neighbours are happy to live and let live when others are reasonable - a few, sadly, are not (I note your previous sad experience of sectarian discrimination, @TeddyB22 ). In most cases, simply going round to the neighbours can give you a good idea whether people are going to be OK, but I note your issues with speaking to people on the telephone and suspect, perhaps wrongly, that these issues are at least as present speaking to people face to face. Is there perhaps anyone who could go to a viewing with you and ask around a little on your behalf?

    When you buy a property, it is normal for the buyer to put questions to the seller as part of the conveyancing process. Without getting too deep into the law, the seller only has a limited duty to disclose issues which really does not extend to neighbour behaviour. The seller's duty to disclose is more about issues with the seller's title of the property, perhaps an undisclosed right of a neighbour to cross the land (what is known as an easement). Even so, buyers have some chance to ask sellers about the neighbours. A prospective tenant does not get this opportunity - and someone in your position has no genuine choice when they are in situations where the housing market is buoyant and most landlords have considerable interest in any available properties to rent.


    As Poppy says, the best you can do is ask as many questions as you feel able to - and do not assume that temporary means you will only be there for a short period. It might be months or even years until you are offered more permanent housing. Before agreeing to move in, I would ask careful questions about whether you can stay there until permanent housing appears, also what happens if this property does not work out. You have more leverage when you are homeless than once you are housed - though you are far more aware than I am of how little is sometimes done for those who are homeless.

    I hope the viewing shows the flat to be more promising than you fear it might be.


    I wanted to return briefly to one point in my earlier post where subsequent comments show I might not have stepped as clearly away from a worst case scenario as I thought I had. I was trying to impress on you how seriously the law can takes something, whilst trying to be clear that I felt the chances of anything happening to you were very low and even if something did happen that the likely consequences would be minor (but nevertheless perhaps troublesome when seeking housing). It is no longer a live scenario - but if my comments did not come across as intended, and any distress was caused, I apologise. Sometimes words on a computer screen do not adequately convey the intended meaning.


    I truly do wish you well and hope that things start to improve soon.
  • TeddyB22TeddyB22 Member Posts: 156 Courageous
    Hi David. Thanks for taking the time to post. I really have learned a valuable lesson now. I'm weary of renting apartments now though living next to someone doesn't lessen the chance of conflict. Although my problem stemmed from my neighbours I also experienced intimidation from others from the area. You see here areas are how can I say this... segregated. The more expensive areas with little Housing Executive tenants tend to be safer and better patrolled by police and neighbourhood watch.
    I know as a Roman Catholic that they're are areas I cannot go. Brexit is around the corner which may mean a return to a hard border here. Apart from the economic and logistic problems it may cause (out may also be fine) any attacks on police or authority at that border could spiral into sectarian tit for tat murder. It is people like me, alone, vulnerable and isolated that were the easiest targets. That sounds a tad maybe dramatic but we became desensitised to the daily parade of coffins bc it was just a normal occurrence.
    I simply would feel safer in an area that didn't have alot of crime etc. 
  • TeddyB22TeddyB22 Member Posts: 156 Courageous
    I've been offered a private house for rent in a fairly decent area. I've paid the deposit and had to pay 2 months upfront bc the landlord has experience of people on universal credit. 
    I have no option but to take it. I've lived in the area before without any problems. It's on a busy road but has double glazing. The house was occupied when I viewed it so I expected there won't be anything there when I move in. I'm going to have to furnish the place. There's no washing machine, fridge, cooker or bed. I'll just have to gather things up.
    Is oil central heating so I need to fill the tank up for winter. 
    I have a PIP Tribunal on Thursday. Nearly one and a half years after my initial interview. However my Doctors receptionist hasn't printed my medical notes yet and I won't have time to send them. They should have been ready weeks ago. When I complained the receptionist said 'they don't read them anyway'. I think the decision is made before you even enter the room. I have no representation and I'm just anxious to get it done with. It would be a massive help especially now but I'm told the panel of experts are given bonuses for turning people down. The whole experience has been humiliation. Hopefully Labour will win the next election and put an end to this Tory sponsored farce.
    Not sure how to prepare except answer their questions truthfully.
    TeddyB
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    The Tribunal do not receive any bonus's for refusing a benefit. They are totally independent to DWP and the health assessment providers.

    Did you send any evidence to support your claim? If you didn't and they don't have enough information or evidence to support your claim then they could adjourn the hearing for you to send in the evidence they ask you to. This has been known to happy many times.

    Hopefully it doesn't happen to you but good luck and do let us know the outcome.

    The house, i'm glad you've found somewhere that's suitable. For furniture try looking on the free sites on your local face book group and gumtree, they often have things on there. There's also FB sites that sell household items for your area. Well worth having a look. Good luck with the move.
    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 31 Connected
    edited September 2019
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  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    @Apolloesque had you read all the other comments then you would have seen that Teddy has successfully found their self a house from a private landlord.

    Local council housing aren't always helpful and even less so for those that are single. It's extremely difficult out there for those claiming benefits when trying to find somewhere to live.
    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • Adrian_ScopeAdrian_Scope Testing team Posts: 7,924

    Scope community team

    @Apolloesque, we've moderated your comment as it broke several of our community guidelines.

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  • Sam_AlumniSam_Alumni Scope alumni Posts: 7,731 Disability Gamechanger
    Hi @Apolloesque
    @Adrian_Scope has shared our full guidelines for the community, this doesn't mean that you have broken all of these guidelines but that we felt some of your posts weren't in line with some of our guidelines. Please be assured that you are not in any way being accused of encouraging someone to take their own life.

    We have received your email and responded, could you check you email and let us know how to proceed. 
    Best wishes to you.
    Scope
    Senior online community officer
  • TeddyB22TeddyB22 Member Posts: 156 Courageous
    Thank you Polly for your good wishes. I didn't bring my medical notes last time which is why they sent me home and now I'm turning up without them again. If the Dr can somehow push her clerks I might bring them with me. The receptionist did tell me that it is better to bring them personally as they are confidential but I'll just explain about the delay and hopefully they might wait. 
    TeddyB. 
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    It's Poppy not Polly ;) lol

    As they specifically adjourned previously and asked you to send in your medical records, which you haven't done then it could be adjourned again for the same reason.

    I recently requested my medical records from my GP practice and they were ready to view online within 36 hours. They are free to receive digital copies but any paper copies will need to be paid for.

    Taking evidence with you on the day is risky too because they may not have time to read through them, which can cause another delay.
    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • TeddyB22TeddyB22 Member Posts: 156 Courageous
    Sry Poppy, how embarrassing. 
    I wasn't aware that you could give them digital copies and I know from my Dr that fit along time people weren't even aware they only had to bring the last 4 yrs worth. My Dr is going to do mine tomorrow and it should be available for me then. I received a call from (caller no was unknown) I think the Law Society who were contacted by my Psychologist. They said they would represent me. They have advised me to go but ask for another adjournment. This will be the second. I'm really not sure what to do now. Should I bring the medical notes and forgoe representation? I could just not bring them and tell them I need more time to organise representation and medical notes.
    If only they had phoned me a week ago. 
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    No worries. lol  Paper copies of evidence need to be sent to HMCTS, i think you misunderstood what i said. I said that it's free to receive digital copies of your medical records for yourself but any paper copies need to be paid for.

    If you have chance to be represented then i would take that opportunity but asking for an adjournment on the day of the hearing maybe too late but i'm no expert. You should take the evidence with you just incase they refuse to adjourn it again.

    Even with representation you will still need to speak for yourself.

    If it was me then i would have been constantly on the phone to the GP practice asking where that medical evidence is and sent it.

    When is the hearing date? sorry if you already mentioned that but i've got a little lost in this thread because it's gone from talking about permitted work for ESA to UC to renting privately and now onto a PIP Tribunal :o
    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • TeddyB22TeddyB22 Member Posts: 156 Courageous
    My tribunal is tomorrow. I'm receiving printed copies which are free but you have to pay for any subsequent ones. 
    I was on the phone to the receptionist at the doctors. They had told me not to ring and they they would ring me when it was done.
    I was told by PIP helpline that it could be done in 3 days. My Dr said that other patients have been told the same. The tribunal will take 3 days approximately to read through the notes.
    I'm aware ok have to dial for myself but the Doctor on the panel did tell me to bring someone. If feel alot better going through it with someone of expertise. They can't guarantee you'll win but say they have a high success rate. 
    I'm waiting on them calling. I'm nearing the end of this process so can't wait for it to be over. 
  • TeddyB22TeddyB22 Member Posts: 156 Courageous
    Please excuse the terrible grammar. My phone changes words as it sees fit. 
  • Adrian_ScopeAdrian_Scope Testing team Posts: 7,924

    Scope community team

    Good luck with your tribunal @TeddyB22. I hope it goes well. :smile:
    Senior Community Partner
    Scope

    Your feedback is really important to the development of the online community, so please remember to complete our online community annual survey
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    Good luck, do let us know the outcome.
    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    @TeddyB22 how did it go, any news?
    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • Chloe_ScopeChloe_Scope Scope Posts: 10,652 Disability Gamechanger
    Hi @TeddyB22, I hope your tribunal went well yesterday. :)
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  • TeddyB22TeddyB22 Member Posts: 156 Courageous
    Hi. Thank you Chloe. I got an adjournment. They were fine with it. Feel a little deflated as it could have been over had I been a little more responsible and assertive. They asked me for 2 yrs medical advice and only relevant information like Doctor's/Pyshc reports.
    I'm hopeful as my friend got his PIP first go. I guess it all depends on the day.
    Have a great day. 
    TeddyB. 
  • TeddyB22TeddyB22 Member Posts: 156 Courageous
    Thanks everyone for your good wishes. Its not over till its over. 
    TeddyB. 
  • Chloe_ScopeChloe_Scope Scope Posts: 10,652 Disability Gamechanger
    Thank you for your update @TeddyB22! I hope you have a lovely weekend. :)
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  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    I had a feeling it would be adjourned because you didn't send what they asked for. You can't really compare yourself to anyone else because we're all affected differently by these conditions and a diagnosis, doesn't mean you're entitled to PIP.

    If you have the medical records from those years requested then i'd advise you to go through them as soon as possible and send them to HMCTS. This way you're prepared in case you have another date soon.

    Good luck and keep up updated.
    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • TeddyB22TeddyB22 Member Posts: 156 Courageous
    Hi Poppy. 
    I was told at the tribunal not to send them in but to bring them on the day. Seems I'm getting conflicting advice again. I'll have a chat with my representative on Monday. I'm hoping they can see me before the new date is decided. 
  • TeddyB22TeddyB22 Member Posts: 156 Courageous
    I finally moved and the stress is high. Having to deep clean the house as it was filthy. I couldn't believe the housing agent let it out in this state. I'm picking up bits of furniture but missing out bc I don't have transport. Haggling is not my strong point. 
    Got a decent deal with Talk Talk so Internet is on its way. 
    Have to get a sick line and attend a work assessment for Universal Credit. That's causing me some anxiety. I feel sorry for anyone who can't use a computer. It's a convuluted and confusing process. 
    Is sunny on and off today. 
    Hope everyone is doing well. 
    Take care, 
    TeddyB

  • saz11saz11 Member Posts: 121 Pioneering
    @TeddyB22

    Hi Teddy good to hear you have finally moved.
    I am sure in time you will have it looking and feeling like home.

    As to the furniture and things have you tried gumtree around your area you can pick up lots of great freebies and some times they will even deliver for a small fee....defo worth a look.

    Wishing you endless happiness in your new home.
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    TeddyB22 said:
    I finally moved and the stress is high. Having to deep clean the house as it was filthy. I couldn't believe the housing agent let it out in this state. I'm picking up bits of furniture but missing out bc I don't have transport. Haggling is not my strong point. 
    Got a decent deal with Talk Talk so Internet is on its way. 
    Have to get a sick line and attend a work assessment for Universal Credit. That's causing me some anxiety. I feel sorry for anyone who can't use a computer. It's a convuluted and confusing process. 
    Is sunny on and off today. 
    Hope everyone is doing well. 
    Take care, 
    TeddyB

    I'm glad you finally moved. I have moved into some extremely dirty houses in the past so i know exactly what you feel like here. See it as a positive thing to put your stamp on your home, this is what i've always done in the past. Doesn't matter how long it takes. Same with furniture, it will take time to get the things you need/want but you will eventually get those things.

    I picked up my keys for my new house yesterday and i must admit it wasn't the cleanest either. I don't remember it looking that bad when i viewed it. However, i have had permission from my landlord to replace all the carpets, so they have been lifted and removed ready for fitting on Thursday, i'm assuming this caused a huge amount of dust and is most likely the explanation why it's not the cleanest. I don't move in until Saturday, thankfully so i can make sure it's clean before i move in. I have several people helping prepare everything because i'm limited to what i can do.

    There's also a list of things the maintenance team from the agency need to come back and do before i move in. I was expecting them yesterday but no one came. I will be chasing them up if no one comes this morning.

    I have moved several times in the past 15 years and i've yet to find a home where i can simply "move straight into" without any issues. The joys of renting when you claim benefits :|:/
    Community champion and proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice i have given to members here on the community.
  • Adrian_ScopeAdrian_Scope Testing team Posts: 7,924

    Scope community team

    Glad to hear you're in your new place @TeddyB22, but I can completely empathise about moving into dirty rental properties.

    As Poppy said, it'll take some time to make it feel like home, but you might have some luck finding some bits and bobs to furnish it on Freecycle too.
    Senior Community Partner
    Scope

    Your feedback is really important to the development of the online community, so please remember to complete our online community annual survey
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