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WHERE to find the most accurate help filling in PIPS form..not CAB Pls!

OpusOpus Posts: 47 Courageous
CAB is not an option regrettably.

Does anyone know a reliable source to understand and fill in the PIPS form?

Any ideas welcomed..minus the CAB 😂😂😂😂 I can only speak of my experiences with them...i was shocked!

Replies

  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    Hi,


    There's really no specific wording you should use, just be straight to the point and give as much information as possible and tell it how it is. Adding some real life examples of what happened the last time you attempted that activity for each descriptor that applies will also help.

    Be honest and don't base it on your worst day. PIP is about how you're affected at least 50% of the time over a 12 month period.

    Do a little at a time so you don't get even more stressed than you may already be. If you don't have enough time the you can ring to request an extra 14 days. Good luck.

    Proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice I have given to members here on the community.
  • worried33worried33 Member Posts: 399 Pioneering
    I found this website good.

    https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/benefits/sick-or-disabled-people-and-carers/pip/help-with-your-claim/fill-in-form/13-going-out/

    Ironically it is the CAB's website, but its the only website I found that actually gives advice on the descriptors instead of just copy and paste from gov.uk, there is also benefits and work but you have to donate to get access to their guides.

    When I went to CAB the experience was horrible for me, so I dont think you missing a lot by not going, although maybe different CAB offices are better.
  • Sam_AlumniSam_Alumni Scope alumni Posts: 7,731 Disability Gamechanger
    edited August 2019
    Hi @Opus
    Some info here.

    The following sources provide information about filling in the PIP claim form.
    Scope
    Senior online community officer
  • cristobalcristobal Member Posts: 966 Disability Gamechanger
    @opus - what help is it you need?

    Personally, and I'm fairly certain others will disagree, I think it's best to fill the form in yourself.

    There's no-one knows your condition better than you and if you have a face to face assessment you'll be completely familiar with your application - rather than answering questions on what someone else has written...

    There's no 'magic' way to do it, or standard phrases... just look at the descriptors (available on-line) and give examples of the difficulties you have with carrying out daily tasks...

    Good luck...
  • OpusOpus Posts: 47 Courageous
    @poppy123456
    I genuinely am at a 8.5 out of 10 constantly with regrettably..many diagnosed condtions...so even at what i'd call a base level..Im just about functional....If my home was on fire...i'd just about make it out..

    Now!....the major flare ups..(cfs,trigeminal & occipital neuralgia, spinal problems....at least 4-5 flare ups...sofa 4-7hrs can go into 24+hrs stints...
    So  many things overlap....the tmj triggers the trigeminal....eating is an issue..

    so im wondering how to break this all down..

    Just quickly...the constant base line of 8.5 allows me to walk 40yrds  but not without  repercussions on multiple levels....and really can only repeat it maximum 1 more time if that...ive genuinely tried!
    I then spend hours battling the onslaught of variable conditions being triggered....goes well into the night..

    Not trying to ask the impossible but not sure how to break and decompartmentalise all of this???
  • OpusOpus Posts: 47 Courageous
  • OpusOpus Posts: 47 Courageous
  • OpusOpus Posts: 47 Courageous
    Hi @Opus ;
    Some info here.

    The following sources provide information about filling in the PIP claim form.

    Just took a quick look at the Leicester info on PIPS....liking that already!
  • wilkowilko Member Posts: 2,297 Disability Gamechanger
    Everybody has offered or given good advice, and I would most definitely read the descriptors and write on the form using the extra information pages if needed to explain how your conditions effect you on a daily basis in relation to the pip descriptors keeping a dairy of events that which can and do relate to yourself in relation to the descriptors you are writing about on the application form.
  • LindaButler1970LindaButler1970 Member Posts: 40 Courageous
    I asked the DWP for some help filing in the form as hand writing is difficult, they sent a lady from the DWP within a week and its now with them to check. will update on progress. She did not seem to be against me and wrote down quite good answers to reflect my condition, time will tell.
  • OpusOpus Posts: 47 Courageous
    cristobal said:
    @opus - what help is it you need?

    Personally, and I'm fairly certain others will disagree, I think it's best to fill the form in yourself.

    There's no-one knows your condition better than you and if you have a face to face assessment you'll be completely familiar with your application - rather than answering questions on what someone else has written...

    There's no 'magic' way to do it, or standard phrases... just look at the descriptors (available on-line) and give examples of the difficulties you have with carrying out daily tasks...

    Good luck...
    You make it seem all so simple!
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    It's far from easy, if it was then everyone would be filling out their forms their self. I do agree with @cristobal though because only you know how your conditions affect you, not anyone else. There's no specific wording to use or a specific way to fill out the forms. Just put as much information as possible. Before starting if you don't understand the descriptors then this link is a good place to start. https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/personal-independence-payment-assessment-guide-for-assessment-providers/pip-assessment-guide-part-2-the-assessment-criteria#daily-living-activities  Having some understanding really does help. Once you've read it, then start the form.

    I've had help myself many times with filling out forms because i was never confident enough to fill them out myself and didn't know where to start. The information that's been written in the forms has always been limited because they don't have time to sit down and listen to you tell them how your conditions affect you.

    My daughters PIP review forms in October last year was the first attempt for me. I just did one question at a time, used extra A4 paper and added a couple of real life examples, where she was, who was with her and what happened. Once that question was answered i'd leave it until the next day, then carry on where i left off.and did the same thing for each question. If you don't have enough time then ring DWP and they will give you an extra 14 days.

    Once the form was filled in i gathered all her evidence and a highlighter pen. Went through everything and highlighted all the areas that proved beyond doubt that the descriptors applied to her. I highlighted it because i didn't want to risk them not reading it, highlighted means it stood out more and it couldn't be missed. Remember though, less is more. Sending in 100's of pages of evidence won't help because they won't sit there reading through that mountain. Some evidence may even contradict another and this is something you need to be careful of. She was lucky this time because she had a paper based assessment.

    Also by filling out your forms, when you attend the face to face assessment you'll know exactly what you wrote because you did it yourself. During the assessment you'll need to confirm what you wrote in the form because you'll be asked questions related to that.

    Good luck.
    Proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice I have given to members here on the community.
  • OpusOpus Posts: 47 Courageous
    It's far from easy, if it was then everyone would be filling out their forms their self. I do agree with @cristobal though because only you know how your conditions affect you, not anyone else. There's no specific wording to use or a specific way to fill out the forms. Just put as much information as possible. Before starting if you don't understand the descriptors then this link is a good place to start. https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/personal-independence-payment-assessment-guide-for-assessment-providers/pip-assessment-guide-part-2-the-assessment-criteria#daily-living-activities  Having some understanding really does help. Once you've read it, then start the form.

    I've had help myself many times with filling out forms because i was never confident enough to fill them out myself and didn't know where to start. The information that's been written in the forms has always been limited because they don't have time to sit down and listen to you tell them how your conditions affect you.

    My daughters PIP review forms in October last year was the first attempt for me. I just did one question at a time, used extra A4 paper and added a couple of real life examples, where she was, who was with her and what happened. Once that question was answered i'd leave it until the next day, then carry on where i left off.and did the same thing for each question. If you don't have enough time then ring DWP and they will give you an extra 14 days.

    Once the form was filled in i gathered all her evidence and a highlighter pen. Went through everything and highlighted all the areas that proved beyond doubt that the descriptors applied to her. I highlighted it because i didn't want to risk them not reading it, highlighted means it stood out more and it couldn't be missed. Remember though, less is more. Sending in 100's of pages of evidence won't help because they won't sit there reading through that mountain. Some evidence may even contradict another and this is something you need to be careful of. She was lucky this time because she had a paper based assessment.

    Also by filling out your forms, when you attend the face to face assessment you'll know exactly what you wrote because you did it yourself. During the assessment you'll need to confirm what you wrote in the form because you'll be asked questions related to that.

    Good luck.
    Yes,totally it has to be MY words!..

    What i was getting at was ,,what exactly is IT...PIPS are asking?....i know now to a degree but it can be quite ambiguous

    They'll quibble over even real evidence...It does seem like a bit of a lottery...

    your last comment "good luck"   it really is if your numbers come up in many senses!
  • OpusOpus Posts: 47 Courageous
    It's far from easy, if it was then everyone would be filling out their forms their self. I do agree with @cristobal though because only you know how your conditions affect you, not anyone else. There's no specific wording to use or a specific way to fill out the forms. Just put as much information as possible. Before starting if you don't understand the descriptors then this link is a good place to start. https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/personal-independence-payment-assessment-guide-for-assessment-providers/pip-assessment-guide-part-2-the-assessment-criteria#daily-living-activities  Having some understanding really does help. Once you've read it, then start the form.

    I've had help myself many times with filling out forms because i was never confident enough to fill them out myself and didn't know where to start. The information that's been written in the forms has always been limited because they don't have time to sit down and listen to you tell them how your conditions affect you.

    My daughters PIP review forms in October last year was the first attempt for me. I just did one question at a time, used extra A4 paper and added a couple of real life examples, where she was, who was with her and what happened. Once that question was answered i'd leave it until the next day, then carry on where i left off.and did the same thing for each question. If you don't have enough time then ring DWP and they will give you an extra 14 days.

    Once the form was filled in i gathered all her evidence and a highlighter pen. Went through everything and highlighted all the areas that proved beyond doubt that the descriptors applied to her. I highlighted it because i didn't want to risk them not reading it, highlighted means it stood out more and it couldn't be missed. Remember though, less is more. Sending in 100's of pages of evidence won't help because they won't sit there reading through that mountain. Some evidence may even contradict another and this is something you need to be careful of. She was lucky this time because she had a paper based assessment.

    Also by filling out your forms, when you attend the face to face assessment you'll know exactly what you wrote because you did it yourself. During the assessment you'll need to confirm what you wrote in the form because you'll be asked questions related to that.

    Good luck.
    ps...i didnt say it was easy!    hence why sites like these are needed,....I said ,she made it all seem so easy!
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Member Posts: 22,218 Disability Gamechanger
    I never said you did say it was easy. I said "it's far from easy"
    Proud winner of the 2019 empowering others award. This award was given for supporting disabled people and their families for the benefit advice I have given to members here on the community.
  • OpusOpus Posts: 47 Courageous
    edited August 2019
    ilovecats said:
    cristobal said:
    @opus - what help is it you need?

    Personally, and I'm fairly certain others will disagree, I think it's best to fill the form in yourself.

    There's no-one knows your condition better than you and if you have a face to face assessment you'll be completely familiar with your application - rather than answering questions on what someone else has written...

    There's no 'magic' way to do it, or standard phrases... just look at the descriptors (available on-line) and give examples of the difficulties you have with carrying out daily tasks...

    Good luck...
    This is very good advise. Just write it in your own way with your own explanation. Only you know how your restrictions affect you.
    I think the poster knows that...i think hes asking as many do...as to WHAT it is pips is actually enquiring and demanding from you..No one else can fill in your day to day activities without it coming from you....Its the nuance and the way pips words things....
    Can you walk...x and x....Ive never measured with a tape and obviously you have to take a guess...but it varies....so thats whats being asked with...."can anyone show me how to fill in ,,or rather guidance on the questions"..

  • cristobalcristobal Member Posts: 966 Disability Gamechanger
    Opus said:

    You make it seem all so simple!

    The only reason I post on here is that I believe that there are quite a few genuine claimants who should get PIP and fail because they aren't good at filling out forms. To me that's a disgrace, and even worse when you consider that some people suffer from mental health issues which makes motivating yourself, concentrating and accurately completing an application very difficult. It's the perfect 'Catch 22'...

    Sadly, one of the things I'm quite good at is form filling. I learnt a lot from my boss whose mantra was "Keep it to the point and always make it easy for the person reading it." So here's what he would advise!

    Read the descriptors so you know what is required (like in an exam - you don't score if you don't answer the question)

    Then go through them one by one on a separate sheet for each.

    'Preparing food' is good example - tell them how you can/can't chop vegetables, use the hob or microwave, whether you need aids - like a stool to sit on or special utensils, or whether, if you have a more hidden condition, you need someone to motivate you to do it when you're down, or not able to concentrate or fatigued.

    DO NOT tell them that you can't get food out of the oven, and you struggle to take the the food to the dining room, because these are NOT considered. (Neither are going upstairs to the loo, nor shaving nor drying yourself after a bath...)

    When you've done - and it might take you several days - read through what you've written. Ask yourself whether it's all relevant. If it's not then cut it out.

    My personal opinion - and is just that - is that you only need two, or maximum three, examples for each descriptor. If you have more make sure that they ADD something. For example, you might say that you cannot chop veg because an arthritic hand means that you can't grip and also you can't lift a saucepan but then use something different such as having to sit because of xx, or you can't cook because you don't get out of bed for days on end because you're depressed...

    I don't believe that there's a need to add masses of medical notes unless they specifically support what you can/can't do. I have a diagnosed neurological condition which was covered in one page,and is not disputable.

    The advantage to being concise and accurate is that the assessor who picks up your file will smile, have a cup of coffee and read your well constructed application that isn't padded out with fifty pages of waffle. You've made it easy for them to give you what you want. The rest is up to them but if it doesn't work you haven't lost anything...

    It doesn't have to be complicated but it can take a bit of time and effort...
  • cristobalcristobal Member Posts: 966 Disability Gamechanger
    @opus - I posted at the same time as you did and i'm not sure that I really answered your question...

    When you take of ' the 'way PIP words things' you are right. I don't think it's necessarily complicated but it goes back to my exam scenario - read the question carefully and understand what it's about..

    The advantage of PIP over an exam is that you have as long as you like and you can change it as many times as you like...
  • HartleyHartley Posts: 114 Courageous
    cristobal said:
    Opus said:

    You make it seem all so simple!

    The only reason I post on here is that I believe that there are quite a few genuine claimants who should get PIP and fail because they aren't good at filling out forms. To me that's a disgrace, and even worse when you consider that some people suffer from mental health issues which makes motivating yourself, concentrating and accurately completing an application very difficult. It's the perfect 'Catch 22'...

    Sadly, one of the things I'm quite good at is form filling. I learnt a lot from my boss whose mantra was "Keep it to the point and always make it easy for the person reading it." So here's what he would advise!

    Read the descriptors so you know what is required (like in an exam - you don't score if you don't answer the question)

    Then go through them one by one on a separate sheet for each.

    'Preparing food' is good example - tell them how you can/can't chop vegetables, use the hob or microwave, whether you need aids - like a stool to sit on or special utensils, or whether, if you have a more hidden condition, you need someone to motivate you to do it when you're down, or not able to concentrate or fatigued.

    DO NOT tell them that you can't get food out of the oven, and you struggle to take the the food to the dining room, because these are NOT considered. (Neither are going upstairs to the loo, nor shaving nor drying yourself after a bath...)

    When you've done - and it might take you several days - read through what you've written. Ask yourself whether it's all relevant. If it's not then cut it out.

    My personal opinion - and is just that - is that you only need two, or maximum three, examples for each descriptor. If you have more make sure that they ADD something. For example, you might say that you cannot chop veg because an arthritic hand means that you can't grip and also you can't lift a saucepan but then use something different such as having to sit because of xx, or you can't cook because you don't get out of bed for days on end because you're depressed...

    I don't believe that there's a need to add masses of medical notes unless they specifically support what you can/can't do. I have a diagnosed neurological condition which was covered in one page,and is not disputable.

    The advantage to being concise and accurate is that the assessor who picks up your file will smile, have a cup of coffee and read your well constructed application that isn't padded out with fifty pages of waffle. You've made it easy for them to give you what you want. The rest is up to them but if it doesn't work you haven't lost anything...

    It doesn't have to be complicated but it can take a bit of time and effort...
    Excellent insight!
  • OpusOpus Posts: 47 Courageous
    cristobal said:
    @opus - I posted at the same time as you did and i'm not sure that I really answered your question...

    When you take of ' the 'way PIP words things' you are right. I don't think it's necessarily complicated but it goes back to my exam scenario - read the question carefully and understand what it's about..

    The advantage of PIP over an exam is that you have as long as you like and you can change it as many times as you like...
    Thank you very much!
  • OpusOpus Posts: 47 Courageous
    cristobal said:
    Opus said:

    You make it seem all so simple!

    The only reason I post on here is that I believe that there are quite a few genuine claimants who should get PIP and fail because they aren't good at filling out forms. To me that's a disgrace, and even worse when you consider that some people suffer from mental health issues which makes motivating yourself, concentrating and accurately completing an application very difficult. It's the perfect 'Catch 22'...

    Sadly, one of the things I'm quite good at is form filling. I learnt a lot from my boss whose mantra was "Keep it to the point and always make it easy for the person reading it." So here's what he would advise!

    Read the descriptors so you know what is required (like in an exam - you don't score if you don't answer the question)

    Then go through them one by one on a separate sheet for each.

    'Preparing food' is good example - tell them how you can/can't chop vegetables, use the hob or microwave, whether you need aids - like a stool to sit on or special utensils, or whether, if you have a more hidden condition, you need someone to motivate you to do it when you're down, or not able to concentrate or fatigued.

    DO NOT tell them that you can't get food out of the oven, and you struggle to take the the food to the dining room, because these are NOT considered. (Neither are going upstairs to the loo, nor shaving nor drying yourself after a bath...)

    When you've done - and it might take you several days - read through what you've written. Ask yourself whether it's all relevant. If it's not then cut it out.

    My personal opinion - and is just that - is that you only need two, or maximum three, examples for each descriptor. If you have more make sure that they ADD something. For example, you might say that you cannot chop veg because an arthritic hand means that you can't grip and also you can't lift a saucepan but then use something different such as having to sit because of xx, or you can't cook because you don't get out of bed for days on end because you're depressed...

    I don't believe that there's a need to add masses of medical notes unless they specifically support what you can/can't do. I have a diagnosed neurological condition which was covered in one page,and is not disputable.

    The advantage to being concise and accurate is that the assessor who picks up your file will smile, have a cup of coffee and read your well constructed application that isn't padded out with fifty pages of waffle. You've made it easy for them to give you what you want. The rest is up to them but if it doesn't work you haven't lost anything...

    It doesn't have to be complicated but it can take a bit of time and effort...
    Regrettably for me...ive waffled!...

    I'll have to see if ive placed them into a coma or they just barely read any!

    Its certainly a bonus is i was to get help...especially the mobility aspect..but even people that win tribunals...ive heard ,have had it taken away some months later....its like a wobbly jelly....it can go at any time!....dont rock the boat...dont assume its forever....and not even for a year....think ourselves fortunate i guess..however long it lasts...

    ps....would they accommodate the "waffle" considering i have cognitive and neurological issues? 
  • cristobalcristobal Member Posts: 966 Disability Gamechanger
    @opus - you're welcome!

    I forgot my boss's most important piece of advice ;- NEVER assume anything!

    Example - 'bathing' you might 'assume' is having a wash, shave, washing your hair, getting dried ...

    But the gospel according to PIP doesn't agree - it isn't - so you'll have to look at the descriptors on the link that Poppy gave to find out what it is!
  • OpusOpus Posts: 47 Courageous
    cristobal said:
    @opus - you're welcome!

    I forgot my boss's most important piece of advice ;- NEVER assume anything!

    Example - 'bathing' you might 'assume' is having a wash, shave, washing your hair, getting dried ...

    But the gospel according to PIP doesn't agree - it isn't - so you'll have to look at the descriptors on the link that Poppy gave to find out what it is!
    Ive winged it !  ready to send the form already...,theyll have to take me as i am..

    ....I genuinely couldnt keep thinking else i'd have a 3 day migraine aura..Actually hurts to think at times!...

  • OpusOpus Posts: 47 Courageous
    cristobal said:
    @opus - you're welcome!

    I forgot my boss's most important piece of advice ;- NEVER assume anything!

    Example - 'bathing' you might 'assume' is having a wash, shave, washing your hair, getting dried ...

    But the gospel according to PIP doesn't agree - it isn't - so you'll have to look at the descriptors on the link that Poppy gave to find out what it is!
    ps....if you dont mind me asking!...are you a successful recipient of a Benefit?  hence the knowledge/
  • cristobalcristobal Member Posts: 966 Disability Gamechanger
    @Opus

    I initially got 10 points for DL and some points - can't remember - for Mobility...

    I wasn't happy - not with the actual award but with the assessment report. I wanted it to be accurate and it wasn't

    After a bit of faffing about DWP doubled everything (which wasn't what I wanted) and the report was corrected (which is what I did want)

    A long winded way of saying Yes, I do get PIP...
  • cristobalcristobal Member Posts: 966 Disability Gamechanger
    @opusRegrettably for me...ive waffled!...

    You wouldn't waffle if you worked with my boss - he had a zero tolerance approach!

    But was a cracking bloke to work for all the same...
  • OpusOpus Posts: 47 Courageous
    cristobal said:
    @opusRegrettably for me...ive waffled!...

    You wouldn't waffle if you worked with my boss - he had a zero tolerance approach!

    But was a cracking bloke to work for all the same...
    You worked within the system? benefits?
  • cristobalcristobal Member Posts: 966 Disability Gamechanger
    @opus - there's no need to be rude!

    Seriously - no I didn't...Prefer not to say..but it wasn't MI5.


  • OpusOpus Posts: 47 Courageous
    cristobal said:
    @opus - there's no need to be rude!

    Seriously - no I didn't...Prefer not to say..but it wasn't MI5.


    Your boss left an impact!
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