Undiagnosed and rare conditions
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Can you drive safely with Fluctuating Conditions?

JenCoJenCo Member Posts: 122 Pioneering
Hi all, I'm wondering when it comes to fluctuating conditions what the laws are on driving?
They all seem pretty black and white. If you have exactly X all the time then yes/no. What if you have a fluctuating condition?

Is it all down to common sense?
Thanks in advance,
Jenny

Replies

  • anistyanisty Member Posts: 171 Pioneering
    I think you would need to check with dvla and especially with your insurance.
  • JenCoJenCo Member Posts: 122 Pioneering
    True. Some of it is so vague it worries me. 
    I'm happy I have my conditions in order, if I don't feel well I have a couple of hours before I really need intervention/help. That's always enough time for me to say "NOPE" and contact alternate transport as needed. 
    Luckily a very rare occurrence for me. 
    I know things like Vestibular Disorder are way harder for some though and vertigo can come on suddenly. That sort of thing terrifies me. Especially as our local bus route has been cancelled. There aren't lots of us who were dependant on that route (hence it getting cancelled) but there are definitely a few who must feel very isolated right now. 
  • laura222laura222 Member Posts: 84 Pioneering
    I'm trying to get this sorted at the moment. The DVLA have written to my consultant to ask them questions. I think this then goes back to a DVLA medical officer (I think) who then decides whether to conduct an observation.

    Best thing to do is to declare it and then let the DVLA decide what they need to do. As ever when you don't fit into one of the usual boxes it gets a bit complex and takes a lot of time!
  • janer1967janer1967 Member Posts: 9,068 Disability Gamechanger
    Hi and welcome it is important that you report medical conditions to the DVLA so they can review you and your safety to drive much like those with epilepsy have to report it and if they are seizure free for a specified length of time they are able to drive. 
  • pollyanna1052pollyanna1052 Member Posts: 1,998 Disability Gamechanger
    I would hope people can be sensible about their abilities to drive. But having said that, some conditions fluctuate so much, that if they do come on suddenly after a break, then an accident might occur. Tricky one.
    Keep safe everyone x
  • pollyanna1052pollyanna1052 Member Posts: 1,998 Disability Gamechanger
    Further to my above post...I don't drive anymore. My MS took my legs and feet a long time ago.
    I have drivers who drive my car and I sit in my wheelchair in the back.

    It is possible to have a drive from your wheelchair car. I would love one in theory, but it might not be such a good idea in practice!
  • JenCoJenCo Member Posts: 122 Pioneering
    @pollyanna1052
    I learned to drive in an adapted automatic. The only driving instructor I could find who would use hand signals when speaking was a disability specialist. He was great. I never got to use the hand controls to drive the car but I sat in the passenger seat and he showed me how once. It was amazing! I love what assistive tech can do for everyone these days. What freedom!

    Obviously it's not for everyone but it's lovely to see what options are out there. Great to hear you have drivers though, are they friends and family, personally found and funded or is it a local scheme? Sorry if that's a daft/insensitive question. I'm intrigued :)
  • pollyanna1052pollyanna1052 Member Posts: 1,998 Disability Gamechanger
    JenCo said:
    @pollyanna1052
    I learned to drive in an adapted automatic. The only driving instructor I could find who would use hand signals when speaking was a disability specialist. He was great. I never got to use the hand controls to drive the car but I sat in the passenger seat and he showed me how once. It was amazing! I love what assistive tech can do for everyone these days. What freedom!

    Obviously it's not for everyone but it's lovely to see what options are out there. Great to hear you have drivers though, are they friends and family, personally found and funded or is it a local scheme? Sorry if that's a daft/insensitive question. I'm intrigued :)

    Hi again, my drivers are my carers...paid by Direct Payments...then family who do it for love!
  • thespicemanthespiceman Member Posts: 6,408 Disability Gamechanger
    edited March 2020
    Hello @JenCo   Please look at this link.

    In response to your question.

    Must report any medical conditions and any medications ask your GP fitness to drive.

    https://www.gov.uk/health-conditions-and-driving

    @thespiceman
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  • JenCoJenCo Member Posts: 122 Pioneering
    Thanks all,

    To clarify, this is a general query and I'm not (nor do I know of anyone who is) in immediate danger. My GP gave me the all-clear before I even started lessons, as mentioned, my disorder is quite orderly in the grand scheme of things :)

    It's more about the folks I used to share my bus route with. What are they going to do now? There's no alternate public transport out our way. That bus route ran between two big towns and had a stop right by our local hospital's main entrance. The paths around us are none too accessible either so going to the nest nearest stop (a good 10 walk) to get a different route.... to get to a different town... to change to another bus or train.... to get ANOTHER bus... to get to the same hospital... is pretty horrific and scarily isolating. 

    I feel awful for the neighbours I know were reliant on it. I can't even offer lifts as schedule doesn't match up with their needs :( 
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