Just had a text message with my phone assessment date. — Scope | Disability forum
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Just had a text message with my phone assessment date.

BrettW
BrettW Member Posts: 607 Pioneering
edited January 2021 in PIP, DLA, and AA
Got up this morning to see a message on my phone from the Assessment Services. I have a phone interview on the 18th of January at 9am regarding my PIP application.

To be honest seeing this date has finally made the process a reality and has made me a bit stressed because I do find things like interviews a bit of a strain. The finally irony is that January 18th is also my birthday so not the best birthday present I could have wished for :) Just want to get it over and done with now as I know this is going to play on my mind for the next couple of weeks.

Anyway enough of my moaning hope everyone had a happy new year.

Comments

  • janer1967
    janer1967 Member Posts: 15,114 Disability Gamechanger
    Hi therehappt new year

    Take the time to prepare give over your form ready and think of examples of what happens when you try and do the tasks 

    Good luck 
  • Ross_Scope
    Ross_Scope Posts: 6,669

    Scope community team

    Ooooo nearly the same birthday @BrettW, mine is the following day :D 

    As mentioned above, try to take the time to prepare yourself for the situation, but try not to over prepare and work yourself up about it. I'm sure you'll do fine, but make sure you think of your examples and answers to any potential questions, giving focus to how your condition impacts you.
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  • Lulu_1949
    Lulu_1949 Member Posts: 226 Pioneering
    @BrettW hi, my birthday is 15th, so that makes you a Capricorn , shows strength ... you will be fine, good luck
  • BrettW
    BrettW Member Posts: 607 Pioneering
    Thank you for all your comments and advice everyone 
  • mikehughescq
    mikehughescq Posts: 8,845 Connected
    It’s not an interview. It’s a conversation. You have no control over what you’re asked but total control over what you answer. If you leave detail out you allow the HCP to infer things which may not be accurate. They often get called liars but in most cases it’s not true and it’s simply that they were allowed to draw wrong conclusions in the absence of full information. 

    It is helpful to remember that this is but one part of the evidence gathering. It only features prominently if the rest of your evidence is weak. As the date and time has now made it real for you this would the moment to think about and assess the other evidence you have put in. Have you got two real world examples of incidents per activity for example? Not assertions like “I can fall” but full anecdotes like “On the 1st of January I fell in my kitchen when x happened because of y and in front of z. Now is the moment to write all that down (putting aside that it ought to have all been in the claim pack). It’s the most solid prep you can do.
  • Cress
    Cress Member Posts: 1,012 Pioneering
    Can I ask @mikehughescq how would that work with anxiety and depression?
    I must have put something right as I was awarded standard daily living, but I kept thinking I could have a answered better.
    With physical disabilities, you can say what happened when you attempted xyz but with depression, there is no attempting, due to lack of any motivation...just the consequences of not doing it...ie you dont wash, eat or want to go out etc.
    Obviously with anxiety, you can explain any panic attacks etc, but not so with the depression.
  • Cress
    Cress Member Posts: 1,012 Pioneering
    Sorry for butting in on the thread....
  • mikehughescq
    mikehughescq Posts: 8,845 Connected
    Cress said:
    Can I ask @mikehughescq how would that work with anxiety and depression?
    I must have put something right as I was awarded standard daily living, but I kept thinking I could have a answered better.
    With physical disabilities, you can say what happened when you attempted xyz but with depression, there is no attempting, due to lack of any motivation...just the consequences of not doing it...ie you dont wash, eat or want to go out etc.
    Obviously with anxiety, you can explain any panic attacks etc, but not so with the depression.
    if the consequence of the condition is that you can’t do something then it’s no more complex than it is when a physical condition prevents you from doing same. You score points for needing prompting. 7 of the 10 daily living activities for example allow the scoring of points for needing prompting. It’s simply a case of describing those incidents where that need arose. You’d also score points for being unable to do things reliably i.e. within a reasonable time; repeatedly etc. Again, it’s just remembering and detailing the examples.
  • Cress
    Cress Member Posts: 1,012 Pioneering
    Thanks for taking the time to reply @mikehughescq .
    I managed to get 8 points but worried that all the prompting needed wouldnt count for anything as I look after a son with moderate to severe learning difficulties among other things and carry out most daily living tasks for him, I thought they would conclude that if I can do these things for him I should be able to do them for myself....I cant and dont but fortunately the powers that be thought fit to award me standard daily living.
    I remember thinking it would be unfair to be turned down because I couldn't just take to my bed and hide from everything...which is what I'd prefer to do...lol

  • BrettW
    BrettW Member Posts: 607 Pioneering
    edited January 2021
    @mikehughescq I did put examples in my original form back in October but have recent examples of how my daily living is affected. My condition is actually worse than it was back when I filled in the forms so I will make sure they are aware of this with new examples to reinforce what was put on the form
  • mikehughescq
    mikehughescq Posts: 8,845 Connected
    @BrettW telling them you are worse is probably the worst thing you can do. They’re looking at what you were like on your date of claim and have no interest in events afterwards unless they suggest an improvement. The usual response to an assertion that you’re worse now is to refuse the current claim and invite you to make a new claim thus shooting yourself in the foot and losing months of arrears. 

    Claimants often think “I’m bound to get it if I tell them how bad I am now” but the opposite is usually the case. 

    I think we need to be clear. Putting “examples” isn’t necessarily the same as anecdotal evidence. People think that saying “I fall three times last month” is anecdote. It’s assertion. Details of each incident running to at least half a page per fall would be more like it.
  • BrettW
    BrettW Member Posts: 607 Pioneering
    Hi

    When I said I would make them aware I didn't mean I would just blurt out I was worse.

    I didn't put things in my form like I fell 3 times last month but instead told them how things affected me when doing that particular task

    I didn't exaggerate anything or put things in the form just because that's what I think they wanted to hear I just gave them honest simple explanations on how my health conditions affect my day to day life now

    If that means I don't get awarded Pip then I'll accept that but all I can do is be open and honest with them
  • poppy123456
    poppy123456 Member Posts: 28,435 Disability Gamechanger
    edited January 2021
    No one advised anyone to exaggerate and i'm not sure why you thought that. If a person did this then it could be classed as benefit fraud. You should always tell the truth.

    Recent real world examples really help with a PIP claim and giving these examples during an assessment will be very difficult. If i was having my assessment there's no way i would be able to sit there and answer questions with examples straight off the top of my head, even if it was all written down because you don't know exactly what questions they will ask.

    All you can do is be honest and answer those questions as best as you can. If the worst happens and you're not awarded,  (although most people are successful) then you'll have the MR and Tribunal routes.
  • BrettW
    BrettW Member Posts: 607 Pioneering
    No one advised anyone to exaggerate and i'm not sure why you thought that. If a person did this then it could be classed as benefit fraud. You should always tell the truth.

    Recent real world examples really help with a PIP claim and giving these examples during an assessment will be very difficult. If i was having my assessment there's no way i would be able to sit there and answer questions with examples straight off the top of my head, even if it was all written down because you don't know exactly what questions they will ask.

    All you can do is be honest and answer those questions as best as you can. If the worst happens and you're not awarded,  (although most people are successful) then you'll have the MR and Tribunal routes.
    I didn't say anyone had advised me to exaggerate or suggest that some had I just said I didn't exaggerate anything I put in the form.

    I suppose everyone is different Poppy if someone asks me for an example of something I've done or something I've experienced I can give them an answer. Thats why I said I only filled out my form simply and honestly. That way if they ask me about anything I put on the form I could answer them without really having to think about it because its something I've experienced.

    It will be the same if they ask me about something I hadn't put on the form. I can either give them a response clarifying the point asked or I can just say thats not something that applies to my situation. 
  • Tumilty
    Tumilty Member Posts: 49 Courageous
    hi, does everyone get notification as to when they will get the call as mine was out of the blue? 
  • poppy123456
    poppy123456 Member Posts: 28,435 Disability Gamechanger
    Tumilty said:
    hi, does everyone get notification as to when they will get the call as mine was out of the blue? 

    HI,

    A call for what? Sorry but it's not clear what you're asking. If you mean a call for the assessment then yes you should receive a letter with at least 7 days notice.
  • Tumilty
    Tumilty Member Posts: 49 Courageous
    Tumilty said:
    hi, does everyone get notification as to when they will get the call as mine was out of the blue? 

    HI,

    A call for what? Sorry but it's not clear what you're asking. If you mean a call for the assessment then yes you should receive a letter with at least 7 days notice.
    Hi,
    Yes sorry I meant that, I was called and assessed by a health professional out of the blue which set my panic off.
    I guess there is no way to prove it. 
    I did mandatory reconsideration over the phone and wished I'd mentioned it. 

    Thanks

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