What do you get from the great outdoors? — Scope | Disability forum
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What do you get from the great outdoors?

Cher_Inactive
Cher_Inactive Posts: 4,414

Scope community team

edited May 23 in Coffee lounge

This month is officially National Walking Month; an annual celebration of getting outside, feeling the breeze and breathing in that glorious fresh air.  


Ramblers walking on a country path

It's fair to say that walking and wheeling has reached new heights of popularity following the last year being spent under lockdown.  And as restrictions ease, it's useful to reflect on the positives of getting outside.  

The benefits of walking for people with anxiety were recently discussed in this BBC article.  Whilst, research conducted by the organisation 'Living Street' found Brits especially loved walking for the following reasons:
  • physical health benefits
  • mental health benefits
  • meeting friends safely
  • discovering new places
  • saving money

Getting more active

If getting outside is something you want to do more of, then never fear.  There are walking groups for disabled people, such as Disabled Ramblers and Walking for health.  Plus, this NHS webpage 'Get active with a disability' has suggestions on how to gently introduce activity into your daily life.

What does walking/wheeling outside do for you?

Our community has discussed the accessibility of different walks before and I know that it brings many of our members peace of mind during difficult times.  So what I wanted to ask today was: how often do you get outside?  Do you have a favourite route?  Do you go far? What has walking/wheeling added to your life?

Let us know your thoughts in the comments below :)
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Comments

  • woodbine
    woodbine Community Co-Production Group Posts: 5,256 Disability Gamechanger
    We live next door to a farm, and 2 stables and woodland, but have to plead guilty to not making the most of this, if you can make a resolution half way through the year mine will be to get more out of our surroundings.
    Offering PIP advice to people with epilepsy.
  • janer1967
    janer1967 Member Posts: 12,213 Disability Gamechanger
    I go out to appt and to local shop when I have to 

    But hoping yi get out more in better weather and progress to going in my own to local places 
    Here to help with my experience in hunan resources and employment rights 
  • coylygirl
    coylygirl Member Posts: 281 Pioneering
    I only started walking regularly in March when I took on the Samaritan's 310,000 steps in March challenge.  I averaged 5miles a day and found places that I have never known existed in 20+ years of living in the same village.  I had just come out of a bipolar manic phase and getting out in the fresh air every day prevented me from slipping into a depressive phase.  Thankfully I am otherwise health and fairly fit and I managed to complete the steps in the allotted time.  In April I didn't have the motivation to go out and that dreaded depression hit me big time.  I found another challenge in May and have been walking nearly every day, weather permitting, and have nearly reached my 100 mile target.  My mood and mental health have improved exponentially and I have set myself a goal of 1 million steps in 3 months (about 5 1/2 miles per day) just to motivate myself to get out there.  Walking and enjoying nature really clear my mind and the sights and sounds I encounter appeal to my senses.  The birdsong, the flowers and trees, the breeze and even the rain all add to the experience.  I have maintained a stable mood for 4 weeks now and long may this last.  The benefits of walking and the great outdoors are multifold, I am getting fitter and losing inches (around my girth, fortunately not my height as I am only 5" tall) and the sense of achievement I feel when I complete a long walk is immense.  Walking on my own or with company is a joy and I am grateful that I am able to do this on a regular basis.  
  • leeCal
    leeCal Member Posts: 4,222 Disability Gamechanger
    edited May 23
    Dwelling in the natural world is definitely cathartic. I try to visit a local woodland which is beautiful really at any time of the year, all the seasons have their merits. 

    Touching base with nature is very good for menatal and physical health, no doubt about it. Even if I visit the beach I get some relief from my tinnitus just by hearing the sound of the ebb and flow of the waves on the pebbles. Lovely.
    ☺️
  • Sandy_123
    Sandy_123 Member Posts: 1,967 Pioneering
    To get to my local shop, drs etc I have to cross over a field, on way back I sit on the bench, I've had many people sit on the bench with me and lots of conversations with strangers. 
  • fluffycat
    fluffycat Member Posts: 215 Pioneering
    edited May 23
    Instead of sitting inside and playing music. one can do it on the hoof, potentially putting a spring in step and making less mundane.

    Am bored of most feasible park / waterway etc. walks which have been over-done by now. Trying to shake things-up but limitations with finding a WC on way round. (more people about so less chance to sneak behind a bush!!)

    Otherwise, incorporate in grocery or other shopping, beverage or meal / picnic, for an excuse to venture out. 


    Having a tracker or phone that counts steps does motivate one a bit. Love when the band vibrates at 10k which I aim to do most days. (often 10 to 20 or more)
  • OverlyAnxious
    OverlyAnxious Member Posts: 1,642 Disability Gamechanger
    Hayfever.  :#

    Walking is something I really took for granted until about 2 years ago.  Used to do about 2 or 3 miles regularly through various outdoor settings.  If I could find somewhere completely free of people, dogs, roads, etc that really helped me relax away from the real world.  Now I can barely manage half a mile due to a combination of issues.  I am still trying to get out once a week though, park as close as I can to a park or similar and see if I can manage a few steps. :)
  • Dragonslayer
    Dragonslayer Community Co-Production Group Posts: 1,523 Pioneering
    Walking is something I took for granted, like most others. Now I find it hard and painful and can only go short distances. But I loved to walk around the Yorkshire Dales, when able. I have a park opposite my house literally yards away from the front door, but don't even try to walk around that. Just the thought puts me off.
    I'm going down to Cornwall soon. I will try to do more there.
    My wheeled walker should help. But I feel a little embarrassed when using it.
  • Tori_Scope
    Tori_Scope Posts: 5,974

    Scope community team

    I find incorporating a bit of walking with an errand I need to do helps motivate me to get out when I'm slugging around in the house @fluffycat. Well done on the 10kms!
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  • Tori_Scope
    Tori_Scope Posts: 5,974

    Scope community team

    Enjoy your trip to Cornwall @Dragonslayer
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  • DaddyBear
    DaddyBear Member Posts: 35 Connected
    Exploring places I never heard of. Seen from bus, recommendations, being with nature that I 💘
  • newborn
    newborn Member Posts: 724 Pioneering
    This stuff is actually quite offensive and alienating.   Imagine a world where every single bright idea is 'this or that for WHITE's ONLY'.   If you are not white you might wonder why nobody believed someone like you could even exist.   Scope is a disability website, so it might have been one place free from the assumption that people who are not athletes, in fact cannot leave their homes, do actually exist.   Inconvenient truth.   
  • [Deleted User]
    [Deleted User] Posts: 0 Listener
    newborn said:
    This stuff is actually quite offensive and alienating.   Imagine a world where every single bright idea is 'this or that for WHITE's ONLY'.   If you are not white you might wonder why nobody believed someone like you could even exist.   Scope is a disability website, so it might have been one place free from the assumption that people who are not athletes, in fact cannot leave their homes, do actually exist.   Inconvenient truth.   
    Indeed, don't fall for the total bobbins spouted by racist Daily Fail readers who think all disabled adults should've been discombobulated at birth and are workshy slaves to the benefit system.

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