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Looking into applying to be a Deputy for my son under Court of Protection. Are there disadvantages?

SteveESteveE Member Posts: 54 Courageous
I'm looking into applying to be a Deputy for my son, under the Court of Protection process. My son is 50. And I'd be pleased to hear about the experience of other parents who have gone down this route. I can see the advantage of being legally seen as a  decision maker but (along with the rather hefty fees, upfront and ongoing) are there any disadvantages? Thanks in advance.
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  • Tori_ScopeTori_Scope Posts: 4,959

    Scope community team

    Hi @SteveE :) This isn't something I have experience of, so I'm not able to help in that sense. I made an edit to the title of your post to make it a little clearer what your exact question is.

    When having a look online, I mainly found information about what a deputy can and can't do, rather than disadvantages or drawbacks. Have you read into everything that would be required of you, and what your powers would be? 
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  • SteveESteveE Member Posts: 54 Courageous
    Hi @SteveE :) This isn't something I have experience of, so I'm not able to help in that sense. I made an edit to the title of your post to make it a little clearer what your exact question is.

    When having a look online, I mainly found information about what a deputy can and can't do, rather than disadvantages or drawbacks. Have you read into everything that would be required of you, and what your powers would be? 
    Thanks for the reply.

    Yes I have read the whole lot. If folks who are already a Deputy under a Court of Protection are able to say they've found no drawbacks, then that would be very very helpful. 

    It'd be good to know if Scope itself has any advice on this.

    My interest in applying has been prompted by two recent and separate instances with support organisations of being obstructed in sorting things for our son. Given we make every decision for our son (and have done so for the last 50 years) it is worrying when authorities start demanding proof of our right to speak for our son. He has never been able to give that permission - and that is also why Lasting Power of Attorney is not applicable here. The daft thing is that one of the two authorities suggested we write a letter "from our son" giving his permission for us to speak for him, and to have him sign with a thumbprint! Of course, all of that would have to be initialised by us, written by us, thumbprint somehow done with our help, and delivered by us. Nonsense. 

    Hoping we are not the only ones in this position.

    Steve

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